Regreening the Bare Hills: Tropical Forest Restoration in the Asia-Pacific Region / Edition 1 by David Lamb | 9789048198696 | Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Regreening the Bare Hills: Tropical Forest Restoration in the Asia-Pacific Region / Edition 1

Regreening the Bare Hills: Tropical Forest Restoration in the Asia-Pacific Region / Edition 1

by David Lamb
     
 

ISBN-10: 9048198690

ISBN-13: 9789048198696

Pub. Date: 10/28/2010

Publisher: Springer Netherlands

In Regreening the Bare Hills: Tropical Forest Restoration in the Asia-Pacific Region, David Lamb explores how reforestation might be carried out both to conserve biological diversity and to improve the livelihoods of the rural poor. While both issues have attracted considerable attention in recent years, this book takes a significant step, by integrating

Overview

In Regreening the Bare Hills: Tropical Forest Restoration in the Asia-Pacific Region, David Lamb explores how reforestation might be carried out both to conserve biological diversity and to improve the livelihoods of the rural poor. While both issues have attracted considerable attention in recent years, this book takes a significant step, by integrating ecological and silvicultural knowledge within the context of the social and economic issues that can determine the success or failure of tropical forest landscape restoration.

Describing new approaches to the reforestation of degraded lands in the Asia-Pacific tropics, the book reviews current approaches to reforestation throughout the region, paying particular attention to those which incorporate native species – including in multi-species plantations. It presents case studies from across the Asia-Pacific region and discusses how the silvicultural methods needed to manage these ‘new’ plantations will differ from conventional methods. It also explores how reforestation might be made more attractive to smallholders and how trade-offs between production and conservation are most easily made at a landscape scale. The book concludes with a discussion of how future forest restoration may be affected by some current ecological and socio-economic trends now underway.

The book represents a valuable resource for reforestation managers and policy makers wishing to promote these new silvicultural approaches, as well as for conservationists, development experts and researchers with an interest in forest restoration. Combining a theoretical-research perspective with practical aspects of restoration, the book will be equally valuable to practitioners and academics, while the lessons drawn from these discussions will have relevance elsewhere throughout the tropics.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9789048198696
Publisher:
Springer Netherlands
Publication date:
10/28/2010
Series:
World Forests Series, #8
Edition description:
2011
Pages:
550
Product dimensions:
1.25(w) x 9.21(h) x 6.14(d)

Table of Contents

Preface

Abbreviations

Chapter 1: Deforestation and its Consequences in the Asia-Pacific region Introduction Deforestation rates The new landscapes Estimates of the area of ‘degraded’ land potentially available for reforestation Assessing the extent of biodiversity losses Consequences of deforestation and biodiversity loss Is the Protected Area network able to protect regional biodiversity?
Conclusions References

Chapter 2: Forest and Land Degradation in the Asia-Pacific Region Introduction Natural disturbances Human uses of forest Environmental determinants of deforestation The socio-economic context – a short history of deforestation in China and Japan Deforestation and degradation in the Asia-Pacific region Seven forest and land degradation Case Studies Lessons emerging from these Case Studies about the causes of forest and land degradation Thresholds and forest transitions Conclusions References

Chapter 3: Reforestation, Conservation and Livelihoods Introduction Defining and assessing rural poverty Natural forests and livelihoods Biodiversity Conservation or Livelihood Improvements?
Reforestation to enhance livelihoods and foster biodiversity conservation The role of land tenure Land tenure and reforestation Community forestry Community or private reforestation?
Conclusions References

Chapter 4: Different Types of Reforestation Introduction A conceptual model of degradation and forest restoration Choosing between Ecological Restoration, Plantation Monocultures and Rehabilitation Degradation and resilience Building resilience during reforestation Conclusions References

Chapter 5: Natural Regeneration and Secondary Forests Introduction Defining secondary forests Natural regeneration at disturbed sites Environmental services provided by secondary forests Using natural succession to overcome degradation Accelerating successional development Managing established secondary forests Using secondary forests to create agroforests Conclusion References

Chapter 6: Monocultural Plantations Introduction Reasons for establishing plantations Implementing reforestation on degraded lands The particular case of mine site rehabilitation The standard plantation model Limitations of this standard model The hazards of monocultures Species choices Sources of information on species choices Problems needed resolution before using a wider range of species in reforestation programs Monoculture plantations, biodiversity and environmental services Conclusions References

Chapter 7: Mixed-species Plantings Introduction Some potential advantages of mixed-species plantations Species functional types Designs for mixed-species plantations Identifying ecologically complementary species Some management issues Mixtures at a landscape scale – a mosaic of monocultures Providing environmental services Conclusions References

Chapter 8: Ecological Restoration Introduction Re-assembling forest ecosystems Examples of Ecological Restoration of tropical forests Some tentative principles governing the ways in which forest ecosystems might be restored In practice Direct seeding The social context Monitoring and adaptive management Conclusions References

Chapter 9: Income for Farmers from Tree-planting Introduction Markets for forest products – examples from Vietnam Forest product markets elsewhere in the Asia-Pacific region Market chains Financial models of different plantation designs The financial profitability of tree-growing elsewhere in the Asia-Pacific region Reforestation businesses Payments for environmental services The carbon market Increasing the income received by tree-growers Conclusions References

Chapter 10: Assisting Farmers to Undertake Reforestation Introduction Farmers and the farming environment Making reforestation attractive to farmers The transition away from traditional forms of silviculture Reforestation following government assistance Reforestation with assistance from private timber companies Reforestation with assistance from Non Government Organisations Are partnerships enough? The role of incentives Building socially resilient forms of reforestation Judging success from a farmer’s perspective Conclusion References

Chapter 11: Reforestation at a Landscape Scale Introduction The nature of landscape mosaics Ecological processes in evolving landscape Building resilience at the landscape scale How much reforestation?
Where to undertake reforestation?
What types of reforestation at particular locations?
Planning Forest Landscape Restoration Approaches and decision-support tools for Forest Landscape Restoration Conclusions References

Chapter 12: Developing Institutions to Support Reforestation Introduction The future context?
Undertaking reforestation in future New institutional changes to encourage reforestation Revisiting resilience Conclusions References

Chapter 13: Conclusions Introduction Alternative visions of the future Some things we still need to know Finally

Glossary of terms

Index

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