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Regulating A New Society / Edition 1

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Overview

Morton Keller, a leading scholar of twentieth-century American history, describes the complex interplay between rapid economic change and regulatory policy. In its portrait of the response of American politics and law to a changing economy, this book provides a fresh understanding of emerging public policy for a modern nation.
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Editorial Reviews

Reviews in American History
Keller is brilliantly informed about important aspects of the regulatory phenomena that swept across American public life in the first part of the twentieth century.
— K. Austin Kerr
New Republic

Keller treats the reader to detailed accounts of how pre-New Deal bureaucrats and judges reinterpreted antitrust laws, developed entire systems of railroad and utility regulation, designed rules governing automobiles and their carriers, created an entire branch of law devoted to corporations...and established rules for banks and insurance companies. America's regulators and judges were far busier before the New Deal than is commonly supposed.
— Robert B. Reich

Journal of American History

Beginning in 1977 with Affairs of State: Public Life in Nineteenth-Century America, Morton Keller embarked on a major examination of the American polity from the Civil War to the New Deal. He piloted the project into the twentieth century with Regulating a New Economy, and now has added a companion volume, Regulating a New Society...Together [these books] constitute nothing less than the most exhaustive investigation of the American polity in this period ever undertaken.
— Alan Dawley

Virginia Quarterly Review
In this richly textured work, Mr. Keller investigates the public policy response to the emerging problems of early 20th-century America.
The Review of Politics

This book is a pleasure to read and should be in the personal library of every scholar interested in twentieth-century social and political history...This extraordinarily well documented work covers the changes and struggles surrounding a diverse range of social policies.
— Alan Stone

Journal of Interdisciplinary History

Keller observes that there were some striking similarities between the central concerns of American politics during the early decades of the twentieth century and the issues of today—for example, the status of women, the breakdown of families, racial and ethnic diversity, and abuses of power. Keller provides an extraordinary account of the public policies pursued in light of these concerns...[A] magisterial book.
— Martin Shefter

Journal of Social History

This is an impressive synthesis of progressive era (and beyond) scholarship that, like its predecessors, will enjoy a long shelf-life and continue to give political history a good name.
— Edward D. Berkowitz

Choice
A work of exceptional breadth, scholarly elegance, and comparative richness...[It] ranges lucidly and deftly across the landscape of early 20th-century European and American society...Combining the virtuosity of a political, social, and legal historian, Keller breaks new ground in examining the impact of late 19th-century industrialization, urbanization, and immigration on such institutes as marriage and the family, church and state, and the criminal justice system...The book's remarkably fresh insights reflect Keller's view that contemporary public policy debates remain grounded in their Progressive Era origins.
New Republic - Robert B. Reich
Keller treats the reader to detailed accounts of how pre-New Deal bureaucrats and judges reinterpreted antitrust laws, developed entire systems of railroad and utility regulation, designed rules governing automobiles and their carriers, created an entire branch of law devoted to corporations...and established rules for banks and insurance companies. America's regulators and judges were far busier before the New Deal than is commonly supposed.
Journal of American History - Alan Dawley
Beginning in 1977 with Affairs of State: Public Life in Nineteenth-Century America, Morton Keller embarked on a major examination of the American polity from the Civil War to the New Deal. He piloted the project into the twentieth century with Regulating a New Economy, and now has added a companion volume, Regulating a New Society...Together [these books] constitute nothing less than the most exhaustive investigation of the American polity in this period ever undertaken.
The Review of Politics - Alan Stone
This book is a pleasure to read and should be in the personal library of every scholar interested in twentieth-century social and political history...This extraordinarily well documented work covers the changes and struggles surrounding a diverse range of social policies.
Journal of Interdisciplinary History - Martin Shefter
Keller observes that there were some striking similarities between the central concerns of American politics during the early decades of the twentieth century and the issues of today--for example, the status of women, the breakdown of families, racial and ethnic diversity, and abuses of power. Keller provides an extraordinary account of the public policies pursued in light of these concerns...[A] magisterial book.
Journal of Social History - Edward D. Berkowitz
This is an impressive synthesis of progressive era (and beyond) scholarship that, like its predecessors, will enjoy a long shelf-life and continue to give political history a good name.
Booknews
As in Regulating a New Economy, his earlier book on the changing American economy, Keller (history, Brandeis U.) integrates political, legal, and governmental history, now providing a comprehensive study of the ideas and interests that shaped early 20th-century American social policy. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674753631
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 2/1/1996
  • Edition description: REPRINT
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 314
  • Product dimensions: 0.66 (w) x 6.14 (h) x 9.21 (d)

Meet the Author

Morton Keller received his M.A. and Ph.D. in History from Harvard University, and is author of numerous books and articles, including In Defense of Yesterday: James M. Beck and the Politics of Conservatism and The Art and Politics of Thomas Nast. He has also edited books on the New Deal and the age of Theodore Roosevelt. Mr. Keller is currently Samuel J. and Augusta Spector Professor of History at Brandeis University.
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Table of Contents

Preface
Introduction 1
1 The Family and the State 13
The Matrix of Marriage
The Dilemmas of Divorce
Parent and Child
2 Church and State, School and Society 38
Church and State
School and Society
3 Private Rights and Civil Liberties 69
The Interests of Personality
Civil Liberties and Social Change
The Passions of Politics and War
4 Private Vices, Public Mores 109
Frailties of the Flesh
The Crusade against Drink
Jerusalem Lost
5 Crime and Punishment 149
The Face of Crime
Criminal Justice
6 Social Welfare 178
Comparative Perspectives
Poverty and Pensions
The Public's Health
The Condition of Labor
7 Immigrants and Aliens 219
Restriction
Aliens, Citizenship and Race
8 Blacks and Whites 251
Progressivism and Race
Racism and Normalcy
9 Indians and Women 282
Assimilation
Suffrage
Abbreviations 311
Notes 315
Index 389
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