Relational Concepts in Psychoanalysis: An Integration / Edition 1

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $38.34
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 52%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (14) from $38.34   
  • New (4) from $76.69   
  • Used (10) from $38.34   

Editorial Reviews

British Journal of Psychiatry

This is a marvelous book. Mitchell argues that over the past few decades psychoanalysis has undergone a paradigm shift. The change is nothing short of a revolution in thought which radically alters our understanding of the mind and human relationships...Mitchell is a persuasive writer who skilfully draws together the central ideas from object relations theory, interpersonal psychoanalysis and the self-psychologies. He argues that despite their many differences these 'newer' traditions have one central theme in common—they all stress the central importance of personal relationships and human interaction. In this new paradigm the focus of psychoanalytic study shifts away from the vicissitudes of the instincts to persons in their interactions with others...The book is scholarly and informative, but yet it is readable, and enjoyably so. Mitchell does a wonderful job in bringing together the relational concepts embedded in the work of Bowlby, Klein, Winnicott, Fairbairn, Kohut, and others...This is an excellent book which brings together the relational concepts that now characterise psychotherapy. This is the leading edge of psychoanalysis, and Mitchell's work certainly helps it to advance.
— C. R. Whyte

Psychoanalytic Books

Brilliant...The gradual unfolding of Mitchell's new theory is accomplished through a dazzling series of thoughtful and penetrating critiques and integrations of psychoanalytic theorizing past and present. Mitchell is extraordinarily well read in psychoanalytic theory, and he has a wide grasp of philosophy, political theory, and literature as well. He writes with clarity and wit, making a long, largely theoretical book as easy to read as any. His text will be an important source of useful ideas and criticism for the continuing development of psychoanalytic theory. The opportunity to share in his wide and searching understanding should not be missed by anyone interested in the field.
— Robert L. Hatcher, Ph.D.

Choice
A well-written, incisive, and very intelligent effort at integrating compatible aspects of the many neo-Freudian psychoanalytic theorists e.g., Sullivan, Klein, Winnicott, Loewald, Schafer, Kohut, Kernberg, Gedo, and Pine...Importantly, [Mitchell] shows how far modern analytic theory has departed from Freud's original instinctual drive theory...His work is a contemporary beacon in the tumultuous seas of psychological thought since Freud. Essential reading.
American Journal of Psychiatry

Readers will find Mitchell to be a persuasive advocate for the centrality of relational thinking in psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice...Thought-provoking...As an added bonus, Mitchell writes very well, and his use of metaphor and wit make this book a pleasure to read.
— Saul E. Rosenberg, Ph.D.

British Journal of Psychiatry - C. R. Whyte
This is a marvelous book. Mitchell argues that over the past few decades psychoanalysis has undergone a paradigm shift. The change is nothing short of a revolution in thought which radically alters our understanding of the mind and human relationships...Mitchell is a persuasive writer who skilfully draws together the central ideas from object relations theory, interpersonal psychoanalysis and the self-psychologies. He argues that despite their many differences these 'newer' traditions have one central theme in common--they all stress the central importance of personal relationships and human interaction. In this new paradigm the focus of psychoanalytic study shifts away from the vicissitudes of the instincts to persons in their interactions with others...The book is scholarly and informative, but yet it is readable, and enjoyably so. Mitchell does a wonderful job in bringing together the relational concepts embedded in the work of Bowlby, Klein, Winnicott, Fairbairn, Kohut, and others...This is an excellent book which brings together the relational concepts that now characterise psychotherapy. This is the leading edge of psychoanalysis, and Mitchell's work certainly helps it to advance.
Psychoanalytic Books - Robert L. Hatcher
Brilliant...The gradual unfolding of Mitchell's new theory is accomplished through a dazzling series of thoughtful and penetrating critiques and integrations of psychoanalytic theorizing past and present. Mitchell is extraordinarily well read in psychoanalytic theory, and he has a wide grasp of philosophy, political theory, and literature as well. He writes with clarity and wit, making a long, largely theoretical book as easy to read as any. His text will be an important source of useful ideas and criticism for the continuing development of psychoanalytic theory. The opportunity to share in his wide and searching understanding should not be missed by anyone interested in the field.
American Journal of Psychiatry - Saul E. Rosenberg
Readers will find Mitchell to be a persuasive advocate for the centrality of relational thinking in psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice...Thought-provoking...As an added bonus, Mitchell writes very well, and his use of metaphor and wit make this book a pleasure to read.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674754119
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 11/28/1988
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 340
  • Product dimensions: 6.46 (w) x 9.59 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Stephen Mitchell
Stephen Mitchell

Stephen Mitchell's many books include The Selected Poetry of Rainer Maria Rilke, The Book of Job, Tao Te Ching, Parables and Portraits, The Gospel According to Jesus, Meetings with the Archangel, and The Frog Prince.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction

Part One Boundaries

1. The Relational Matrix

2. "Drive" and the Relational Matrix

Part Two Sexuality

3. Drive Theory and the Metaphor of the Beast

4. Sex without Drive (Theory)

Part Three Infantilism

5. The Metaphor of the Baby

6. Clinical Implications of the Developmental Tilt

Part Four Narcissism

7. The Wings of Icarus

8. A Delicate Balance: The Clinical Play of Illusion

Part Five Continuity and Change

9. The Problem of the Will

10. Penelope's Loom: Psychopathology and the Analytic Process

References

Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)