Relayer [Bonus Tracks]

( 5 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Dave Thompson
First things first. It's unlikely that this remaster will convert anyone who rejected Relayer in the past. Even more than its predecessor, the sprawling Tales from Topographic Oceans, Relayer was the sound of a band that built its reputation on vast, ambitious ideas, facing up to the fact that it had completely run out of them -- and the so-ponderous intro to "The Gates of Delirium" remains the most disappointing opening that any Yes album has ever endured. How sad that they didn't forget the final mix and go with the studio runthrough instead. Closing the three bonus tracks that pack out the 2003 remaster of Relayer, a full-length blast through that side-long ...
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CD (Remastered / Bonus Tracks)
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Dave Thompson
First things first. It's unlikely that this remaster will convert anyone who rejected Relayer in the past. Even more than its predecessor, the sprawling Tales from Topographic Oceans, Relayer was the sound of a band that built its reputation on vast, ambitious ideas, facing up to the fact that it had completely run out of them -- and the so-ponderous intro to "The Gates of Delirium" remains the most disappointing opening that any Yes album has ever endured. How sad that they didn't forget the final mix and go with the studio runthrough instead. Closing the three bonus tracks that pack out the 2003 remaster of Relayer, a full-length blast through that side-long disappointment packs a sparkle and energy that the released version absolutely lacks. The guitars and keyboards shimmer, Anderson's vocal is alive with enthusiasm, and there's a dynamism to the rhythms that simply echoes through your head. Elsewhere among these remasters, the alternate versions of familiar songs have offered little more than a rough blueprint of subsequent majesties. This time, the outtake is the best thing in sight, with the closing "Soon" section standing among the finest Yes recordings of all. "Soon" reappears again among the bonus tracks, in the form of a tight little single edit; "Sound Chaser," too, made it onto 45, and it's intriguing to hear its original nine minutes cut down to just over three, dominated by guitar lines and a loping rhythm that wouldn't have been out of place on a Led Zeppelin album. The "cha-cha-cha" chorus is still annoying, though, and the bulk of the remastered Relayer will doubtless languish unplayed in your CD collection. For that astonishing reappraisal of "Gates of Delirium," however, it's worth the cost of admission.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 8/26/2003
  • Label: Elektra / Wea
  • UPC: 081227379223
  • Catalog Number: 73792
  • Sales rank: 10,225

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 The Gates of Delirium (21:56)
  2. 2 Sound Chaser (9:27)
  3. 3 To Be Over (9:19)
  4. 4 Soon (4:17)
  5. 5 Sound Chaser (3:13)
  6. 6 The Gates of Delirium (21:16)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Yes Primary Artist
Steve Howe Group Member
Chris Squire Group Member
Patrick Moraz Group Member
Genaro Rippo Tape
Technical Credits
Jon Anderson Composer
Steve Howe Composer
Chris Squire Composer
Yes Arranger, Composer, Producer
Patrick Moraz Composer
Roger Dean Cover Art
Alan White Composer
Greg Allen Art Direction
Mike Allison Contributor
Dan Hersch Remastering
Bill Inglot Producer, Remastering
Eddy Offord Producer, Engineer
Bryan Lasley Reissue Layout
Doug Gottlieb Liner Notes
Don Lehmkul Author
Mansell Litho Contributor
Glen Gottlieb Liner Notes
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 30, 2010

    Best Yes album ever

    Everything written here about the bonus tracks being the best thing on this reissue and the opening of Gates of Delerium being disappointing is total BS. This album is Yes at the pinnacle of their creativity, and I personally wouldn't omit a single minute from any of the three tracks on this album. Gates of Delerium sounds like the soundtrack to some fantastic medieval battle, from the two sides discussing war to an epic battle to the aftermath. It's a musical journey that you don't often here. And listening to Chris Squire's bass playing is groovy hypnotic. Don't listen to the website review.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A great album!

    This album is great from start to finish. After Yes' 1973 Tales from Topographic Oceans album and tour was finished, Rick Wakeman left Yes to focus on his album Journey To The Center of the Earth, so there was auditions of keyboardists, and no one would believe that Vangelis known for his oscar winning score for the movie "Chariots of Fire" almost joined Yes as Rick Wakeman's replacement, but Patrick Moraz auditioned and soon enough, he indeed was the keyboardists that replaced Rick Wakeman, but this was the only album and tour that Patrick Moraz would perform with Yes, and after the album and tour had ended, he left Yes to focus on solo stuff, but on some albums he collaborated with founding and former Yes drummer Bill Bruford on some albums, but he collaborated with Chris Squire on his debut solo album Fish Out of the Water, but in 1981 he joined The Moody Blues and the rest is history, but soon Rick Wakeman would return to Yes for their "Going For The One" album in 1977.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Outstanding!

    Yes' 1974 classic Relayer is the most intense of their albums. It's also one of their very best. Opening monster epic 'The Gates of Delirium' could very well be the most powerful of all of Yes' side-long songs. It's also completely out of its mind! Relayer was the album where Patrick Moraz took over on keyboard duties from Rick Wakeman, and his presence is striking in this song's more thrilling moments. The first seven or so minutes are brilliantly melodic and really catchy, and then it goes completely insane. The next five minutes are probably the most freeform and wild in all of Yes' music. After this, around the 13 minute mark, the chaos clears, the dust settles and from the ashes, Moraz delivers a huge, monumental synth refrain that's eventually, impossibly overshadowed by an amazing guitar solo by Steve Howe that echoes its melody, and by this stage the song has become something absolutely enormous and totally thrilling... and then it all stops...echoing, ebbing, floating away and into the beautiful oasis of the song's 'Soon' segment, which is the most heartbreaking moment Yes have ever created. Bursting with melancholy, it goes for broke in the last 90 or so seconds and it's this sequence that just reduces me to jelly everytime in the way it gently escalates until it reaches an unbelievably gorgeous note, before finally drifting away into one seriously chilling, eerily beautiful coda that flutters and glitters away into the darkness. A total masterpiece. After this, it's amazing Yes have got anything left in them, but with the deranged and riotous 'Sound Chaser' they equal 'Delirium's more far out moments. And with 'To Be Over' they create a gorgeous country-tinged thing of sweetness that provides much needed relief after the full-on intensity of the first two tracks. Relayer is not the best introduction to Yes: start with The Yes Album, Fragile or Close to the Edge, then prepare yourself for this peerless example of prog rock at its best.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Last of the 'side-length epic' Yes albums from their classic era

    'Relayer' is sort of 'Close to the Edge' held up to the fun-house mirror. I find it to be their most experimental and challenging listen of the 'classic Yes' period albums. It's the last time they did a side-long piece ("The Gates of Delirium"), if not the last time they did an epic of the 20-minute range (they returned to that on 'Keys to Ascencion I' with "That, That Is") - that's considering the LP format. If you like your prog-rock with more than a dash of jazz-fusion and darkness, 'Relayer' is your album! (The album has, I believe, among their most beautiful tracks, "To Be Over")

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews