Relic (The Books of Eva I)

( 7 )

Overview

The truth will test you...

For fans of Game of Thrones and The Hunger Games: high fantasy and dystopia meet in this high-stakes tale of a civilization built on lies and the girl who single-handedly brings it down.

When Eva’s twin brother, Eamon, falls to his death just a few months before he is due to participate in The Testing, no one expects Eva to take his place. She’s a Maiden, slated for embroidery classes, curtseys, and soon a ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$13.96
BN.com price
(Save 22%)$17.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (41) from $1.99   
  • New (12) from $10.46   
  • Used (29) from $1.99   
Relic (The Books of Eva I)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 41%)$17.99 List Price
Note: Visit our Teens Store.

Overview

The truth will test you...

For fans of Game of Thrones and The Hunger Games: high fantasy and dystopia meet in this high-stakes tale of a civilization built on lies and the girl who single-handedly brings it down.

When Eva’s twin brother, Eamon, falls to his death just a few months before he is due to participate in The Testing, no one expects Eva to take his place. She’s a Maiden, slated for embroidery classes, curtseys, and soon a prestigious marriage befitting the daughter of an Aerie ruler. But Eva insists on honoring her brother by becoming a Testor. After all, she wouldn’t be the first Maiden to Test, just the first in 150 years.
 
Eva knows the Testing is no dance class. Gallant Testors train for their entire lives to search icy wastelands for Relics: artifacts of the corrupt civilization that existed before The Healing drowned the world. Out in the Boundary Lands, Eva must rely on every moment of the lightning-quick training she received from Lukas—her servant, a Boundary native, and her closest friend now that Eamon is gone.
 
But there are threats in The Testing beyond what Lukas could have prepared her for. And no one could have imagined the danger Eva unleashes when she discovers a Relic that shakes the Aerie to its core.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for Heather Terrell

"Heather Terrell excavates a richly realized and adventurous world from the iced-over wreck of our own."
—William Alexander, New York Times bestseller and 2012 National Book Award winner

"Fans with an insatiable appetite will eat this up."
Booklist

"Adult author Terrell, in her books for teens, weaves fresh complexity... with smart, thoughtful, and resourceful heroines."
Publishers Weekly

"A suspenseful novel that’s as smart and well written as it is inventive, original, and surprising."
—M. J. Rose, author of The Reincarnationist series

“A dystopia set in a post–global-warming future: plucky heroine, lying leaders, ridiculous endurance tests and, yes, two hot guys.”
—Kirkus Reviews

"A remarkable story.... highly recommended."
—Mysterious Reviews

VOYA - Jessica Miller
After Eva's twin brother, Eamon, dies in a horrific fall, Eva takes his place in The Testing. She will be the first "Maiden" in more than 150 years to attempt to become one of their society's leaders. The grueling test takes place in the icy, dangerous wilderness surrounding their fortified city, and each year there are Testers who do not survive to return with the required Relics of the world's past. Eva longs to find a truly amazing specimen, one that depicts the false god, Apple, to bring back to her people to help illuminate the wicked ways that brought the Healing's mighty waters to wash away the immorality of the world before theirs. What Eva finds, though, is not just nature's dangers but also deliberate secrets being kept from her people. Terrell's post-apocalyptic dystopia opens a new series that is both an exciting tale of self-discovery and one of great societal commentary. In Eva's world, the polar ice caps melted and modern civilization was destroyed. Survivors turned to a simpler lifestyle, one more easily controlled by those in power. Readers slowly piece New North's history together as Eva uncovers startling revelations about her own background. Deft world-building creates a believable society in an icy clime with a strong and well-rounded main character. Eva's choices for the future will leave readers anxious to see her tale continue in the next installment. Libraries looking to offer a fresh new perspective in the dystopian field should consider this title. Reviewer: Jessica Miller
Kirkus Reviews
2013-08-15
Standard-issue dystopia set in a post–global-warming future: plucky heroine, lying leaders, ridiculous endurance tests and, yes, two hot guys. Eva is a Maiden of New North, the last remaining civilization after oceans rose and the world flooded. The Lex, or law, of her world is filled with references to the evil of the "false god Apple" and strict hierarchical and gendered rules for living. After her twin brother's death, Eva takes his place as a Testor seeking Relics from the pre-Healing time. If she can find a worthy Relic and craft a suitably moral cautionary tale (but not a Lex-prohibited "fiction"), she can succeed her father as Chief Archon. The plethora of details include Inuit and Latin terms and slightly entertaining but preachy uses of real-world items (Prozac, MasterCards) listed as evils of the past, all of which set this slightly apart from similar books but might overwhelm readers. Moreover, the plot lacks plausibility, some of which is revealed to be intentional but much of which seems designed to propel action. Flat first-person narration and weak characterization detract from the good bits, and in the end, it's really all setup for the next volume anyway. While not egregiously terrible, this is yet another also-ran in the hordes of books vying to be the next Hunger Games or Divergent. (map, illustrations) (Science fiction. 12 & up)
From the Publisher
Praise for Relic

"Heather Terrell excavates a richly realized and adventurous world from the iced-over wreck of our own."
—William Alexander, New York Times bestseller and 2012 National Book Award winner

“Fans of The Hunger Games will devour this book.”
School Library Journal

“With threads taken from The Hunger Games, The Giver, and other dystopian novels, Terrell spins her own story, which has plenty of adventure, some unanswered questions, and a dash of romance... The way relics—iPhones, guns, even makeup—affect the story adds an ironic touch.”
Booklist

"Adult author Terrell, in her books for teens, weaves fresh complexity... with smart, thoughtful, and resourceful heroines."
Publishers Weekly

"Part post-apocalyptic fiction and part high fantasy, Relic is the beginning of a trilogy that is written artfully and with a voice you will not soon forget.  Delicately weaving in elements of Inuit culture as well as elements you might find in Game of Thrones, Heather Terrell creates a world that is as intricate as it is icy.  The intrigue and mystery make it a page-turner, and the rich and complex characters make it hard to forget.  I cannot wait for the sequel!"
—E. Kristen Anderson, Editor of Dear Teen Me

"Technology is a fragile thing and another Dark Age could be closer than you think.... the world built in Relic is unique and has a rich allegorical quality."
—Pittsburgh Post Gazette

"A suspenseful novel that’s as smart and well written as it is inventive, original, and surprising."
—M. J. Rose, author of The Reincarnationist series

“A dystopia set in a post–global-warming future: plucky heroine, lying leaders, ridiculous endurance tests and, yes, two hot guys.”
—Kirkus Reviews

“Even when Eva knows that what she’s doing might come with unforeseen, negative consequences, she cannot ignore her need to know the truth. I love her for that.”
Kirkus Book Report by Mandy Curtis of Forever Young Adult

“I already can’t wait for the second book of the RELIC series to come out. Eva is a strong female character and a great role model for teen girls. This is also a great book for both teens and parents to read.”
—Jennifer Wagner, Connect with your Teens through Pop Culture and Technology

“An exciting tale of self-discovery and one of great societal commentary.... Deft world-building creates a believable society in an icy clime with a strong and well-rounded main character. Eva’s choices for the future will leave readers anxious to see her tale continue in the next installment... a fresh new perspective in the dystopian field.”
—VOYA

"A remarkable story.... highly recommended."
—Mysterious Reviews

From the Hardcover edition.

School Library Journal
10/01/2013
Gr 7 Up—Fans of The Hunger Games will devour this book. The world suffered a cataclysmic flood a century earlier that the survivors believe occurred as punishment by their gods for the evils of that civilization. Now living in the Arctic North, bound by ice and water on all sides, the rulers of the Aerie are rigid and demanding to ensure that they not repeat the evil of their ancestors and bring about another flood. After the death of her twin brother, Eamon, 18-year-old Eva, the daughter of an Aerie ruler, decides to take his place in The Testing, which involves traveling by dogsled over snow and ice to an area where artifacts from the past corrupt civilization must be excavated from a crevasse in the ice. Proper and popular Jasper of the ruling class and outsider Lukas of the Boundary People, servants to the ruling class, are both vying for Eva's attention. Until her twin's death, Eva was a dutiful daughter to her status-conscious parents and not averse to their plans of marrying her to Jasper. Lukas, who had been training Eamon, now works with Eva to prepare her for The Testing. On the eve of the event, he gives her Eamon's journal, which makes her realize that her brother was about to embark on a mission that would change her world forever, but the journal isn't clear about how. The relic that Eva finds during The Testing, and her interpretation of its meaning, alters her worldview and will ultimately lead her to challenge all she believes and holds dear. Although Relic's story line is familiar, Terrell has created an interesting setting and memorable characters. Teens will be looking forward to the next installment in the series.—Kathy Kirchoefer, Henderson County Public Library, NC
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781616951962
  • Publisher: Soho Press, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 10/29/2013
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 540,502
  • Age range: 14 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.88 (w) x 8.48 (h) x 1.03 (d)

Meet the Author

Heather Terrell worked as a commercial litigator in New York City for over ten years before trying her hand at writing. After publishing three historical novels—The Chrysalis, The Map Thief, and Brigid of Kildare—she turned her attention to the realm of young adults. She is the author of the acclaimed Fallen Angel series, published by HarperTeen. She lives in Pittsburgh with her family.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Prologue
 
          Eamon throws his axe into the ice above his head.  He hits a perfect depression in the wall, and the ice grips his axe.  Pulling up hard, he kicks the bear-claw toes of his climbing boots into the ice a few feet higher up.  Like some kind of arctic cat, he scales the frozen Ring.
          He repeats the practiced motion, over and over.  Each time, Eamon makes sure to insert an ice screw level with his waist and secure his rope to it.  Just a precaution should he fall.  Not that he ever has.
          Bit by painstaking bit, the top of the Ring nears.  Although he knows he shouldn’t, that it goes against the primary rule of ice climbing, Eamon can’t resist: He looks down at the hundreds of feet of sheer ice below him.
          Even in the dim moonlight, the site amazes him.  The Ring is a near-perfect, mountainous circle of ice at the center of this last remaining land above the seas, New North.  The view makes the risk of climbing — punishable by exile into the Boundary-lands — worthwhile, he thinks.  That, and the edge it will provide him in the Tests.
          Eamon looks back up.  Despite the cramps in his hands and calves, he smiles a little.  Only a few feet left to the summit.  Just one more swing of his axe, and he’ll be standing on the peak, staring down at New North.  
          He drives his axe hard into a concavity in the ice.   But Eamon is too hasty.  For the first time in his life, he misreads the ice.  The axe doesn’t hold.  It slips out of the giant wall of ice. 
          Sliding backwards, he plummets twelve feet.  He bounces off sharp outcroppings that lacerate his skin.  His descent is stopped only by an ice screw, his rope, and his harness.  Dangling upside down in the frigid midnight air, hundreds of feet from the ground, he starts to pull himself upright on his rope.  Just as he manages to right himself, he sees that his rope is frayed.
          How, Eamon can’t imagine.  He had made the rope himself with sealskin, and was certain of its strength.  But really, the reason doesn’t matter.  All that matters is how he’ll climb the remaining twenty feet with an injured body and a worthless rope.
          He begins to unhook himself from his harness, and the slight pressure makes the rope unravel further.  Just before it snaps and yanks him down with it, he swings his axe into the ice.  Shaking and bleeding, he clings to the face of the ice wall with only his axes and his bear-claw boots.  He has no choice but to climb back up, this time creeping inch by inch. 
          Stupid.  He should never have risked the Ring, no matter the advantage gained for the Tests.  He needs to win the Archon spot, to make sure he can act on what he’s learned, but he didn’t need to try the Ring.  Because of his cockiness and thirst for glory, he now stands to lose everything, whether by death or exile.  The Tests are not worth his life.  And this is not worth what it will do to Eva.
          He sees the summit.  As he plans out how he’ll hoist his damaged body over the lip, a silhouette of a figure appears against the backdrop of the moon.  Instinct tells him to scale back down; he doesn’t want to face the Ring-guards and certain exile.  But he knows his only chance of survival is surrender.
          “Over here,” he calls out.
          The figure moves toward him, leans toward the edge, and stretches out a hand.
          Eamon leaves one of his axes in the ice so he can reach out his hand.  “Thank the Gods, you’re here.”
          As the figure clasps Eamon’s hand, his face becomes clear. 
          “What are you doing out here?”  Eamon asks, too confused to be scared.       
          “I’m so sorry, Eamon.  You were never meant to make it this far.”
          The figure lets go.  And Eamon falls from the Ring into the darkness.

I.
 
Martius 31
Year 242, A.H.
 
          I watch the night fall.  The polar darkness descends more quickly than usual for early spring, and I am suddenly freezing.  I try to relax, but shiver uncontrollably instead and not just from the cold.  Fear of getting caught out here has literally got me shaking.
          My breath forms an icy cloud.  I should be sitting around the hearth with my family and friends, not risking the frigid winds and ice encrusting the turret or the punishment for disobeying the Lex by coming out here after the None bell.  Especially tonight, the Feast of the Tests.  But here I stand, hundreds of feet above the ground.
          I have good reason.  I need to get a final glimpse of New North before morning comes — alone — and no one will look for me here.  The steep, ice-laden staircase to the turret is too dangerous a climb at night for nearly anyone.  Anyone other than me and Eamon, that is, who grew up scaling its heights and knew its stony crevices and dizzying turns intimately.  The turret was our special place.
          Eamon, my twin.  I can barely even think his name.  I’m not ready yet. 
          The glistening Aerie spreads out before me, the fortress of ice and stone at the center of New North.  It is the place where all the Founding families live and work and learn and worship.  It is home.        
          I stare out at the frozen land.  Just over the turret’s edge, I see the ice-walls of the School with its fancifully carved ice-windows gleaming in the low moonlight.  I spot the imposing ice-spires of the Basilick, the place for worship and instruction on the Lex.  Only a glimpse of the Ark in the far distance makes me smile.  The only metal and glass structure on New North, the Ark is our most precious site, where most of the island’s food is grown.  Within its warm, humid walls, I had hoped to find my calling.
          No more.  The innocent Maiden who longed for a peaceful life in the Ark is gone.  She died on the Ring with Eamon, and I became someone else.  But sometimes I don’t recognize the determined girl that replaced her, the one who insists on pursuing her dead brother’s dreams of Testing.  And neither do my poor parents. 
          I take a deep breath and another glimpse.  Encircled by the mountainous icy Ring and set off by the dark Boundary-lands beyond, the Aerie resembles a diamond.  Well, it should look precious since it’s the last true civilization left on earth after the Healing.  The rest of the world lies beneath the seas, a casualty of mankind’s corruption.
          The Ring.  I can’t avoid looking at it any longer.  Not if I want to say a proper goodbye to Eamon before I set off for the Tests.  I gaze at its steep, jagged ice-cliffs — created only two hundred years ago, when the earth flooded in the Healing and the few, remaining arctic islands collided into a single land — but it’s not enough.  I need to get a closer look — as eye-level as possible — and stare straight at the place that killed my brother.
          Lifting up my heavy fur cloak and my long Feast-day skirts, I step up onto the ledge of the turret.  I’ve been up here hundreds of times before, but it takes me a tick to get my footing.  My delicate, ceremonial shoes don’t have the same grip as my kamiks.   
          The moon is generous with her light, and I can see clear across the Aerie to the Ring.  I can even make out the place from which Eamon fell.  Bracing myself, I face the spot head-on.  It looks oddly beautiful in the pale blue moonlight, not murderous like I thought it would. 
          I stretch out my hands toward the place.  Then I close my eyes for a brief tick, hoping to imprint the image on my mind forever.  As if I could take Eamon with me on the Tests tomorrow.
          “Eva!  Get down from there!”
          I don’t need to turn around to recognize Lukas.  I’ve spent the past few months training with Eamon’s former Companion — an expert in survival beyond the Ring — and I’d know his voice anywhere. 
          “I’m fine, Lukas.  Leave me be.  You know better than anyone I can handle this ledge,”  I say, irritated at the interruption.  Even though I’m a Maiden of the Aerie and Lukas is just a Boundary Companion — making it within my rights to speak to him in whatever manner I see fit — I don’t ever talk to him so harshly.  I have too much respect for him.  And too many memories of the friendship that he and Eamon and I shared.  But I need to do this right now.  Alone.
          “You’re not fine, Eva.  That snow is igluksaq.  One more step and you’ll fall.”  It isn’t Lukas’ words that scare me; it’s his tone.  I have never heard him anything but completely calm.  That, and the fact that he knows snow better than anyone, suddenly terrifies me.    
          I cannot move.  If the snow is truly igluksaq, then even one minuscule, incorrect movement will send me sliding off the ledge and flying hundreds of feet down.  Just like Eamon.
          “Stay still,” he orders. 
          I can hear Lukas running across the turret.  His hand clamps down on my arm and pulls me down toward him.  We fall backwards onto the turret on top of each other, both of us breathing heavily.  I struggle out of his bear-like grip and turn around.
          I look into his dark eyes.  “I just wanted —”
          Lukas interjects.  “I know what you wanted, Eva.  To be close to Eamon.”
          He alone understands what Eamon’s death has done to me.  And I think I know what Eamon’s death has done to Lukas.   
          “Yes,” I answer.
          “You know, Eva, you don’t have to scale turret walls or Test to be close to him.  Eamon will always be with you.  His spirit is anirniq.  Or animus, as you Aerie say.”
          His words cut right through me, and I have to stop myself from sobbing.  I’ve spent the past few months trying so hard to be strong, trying to push down the desperate sadness I feel at Eamon’s death and trying to prove I can fulfill his Testing dream for him, that Lukas’ words nearly bring me to the brink.  I can’t have that.  So I stand up, brush the snow off my gown, and grasp onto the least sad thing I can think of.
          “Let me guess, my mother sent you up here to fetch me for the Feast.  I can almost hear her.” I raise my voice up several octaves to my mother’s ridiculously high pitch, an affectation she thinks makes her sound like the ideal Lady as described by the Lex.   “‘How dare Eva break the Lex tonight?  After all she’s done to embarrass this family.’”       
          Lukas chuckles a little, indulging me.  He understands what I’m doing.  “No, she didn’t order me up here.  I volunteered for the job.” 
          “No one else was up for the task of the turret at night?”
          “Fair enough.”  His smile fades.  “We should go down.  They’re all waiting for you to begin the Feast of Tests.  Maiden of the bell.” 
          Lukas offers me his arm.  I gather the long folds of my cloak and gown and take a firm hold of his elbow.  He places his other hand over mine.  Together, down the precipitous, winding stairs, we descend.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(5)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 7, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Dystopian fiction meets high fantasy in Heather Terrell's first

    Dystopian fiction meets high fantasy in Heather Terrell's first book in The Books of Eva series, Relic. Fans of The Hunger Games, Game of Thrones and The Inconvenient Truth will all find something to entertain and to make them think in this novel. In a post-apocalyptic  icy world a young girl must test her survival skills and her beliefs about her society. This is a coming of age story that begs the question, is the history we have been taught real or is it colored by time and what the government wants us to believe? This is a powerful young adult novel that will have readers thinking beyond the box and outside the boundaries of what they already know. A great read!

    When most readers look at a book from the dystopian genre there are several things usually present. Most dystopian literature is post-apocalyptic, as is this one. But most dystopian works feature a lot of violence and killing. Relic is different in the fact that there is basically no violence at all. The competitors in the testing are not competing to survive at the cost of the other Gallants. They are competing to see who can bring back the most influential relic, a piece of history frozen in time. I liked the fact that Terrell didn't need all the violence to make this story interesting. She kept the readers focus by attention to detail and great storytelling.

    This is basically a quest novel. Eva's brother Eamon has met an early death as he trained for the testing. A maiden has not tested in over 150 years but Eva wants to honor the memory of her brother. She is underestimated by her family and her community but she has more heart than they believe she ever could. She faces the Arctic tundra and braves more than just the elements to bring back a Relic that may change the course of history for her people. Eva is a wonderful character. Resourceful and full of surprises. She challenges what she knows to be true at every turn and defies the odds against her. Terrell does a masterful job of giving readers a protagonist that is worthy of the title.

    I liked the fact that Relic differs from other books in the genre in the fact that instead of being a highly evolved society, Aerie has basically went back in time instead of forward. When the Healing (flood brought on by the misuse of the Earth) cleansed the world, everything changed. But what Eva and the rest of her community have come to believe, may not be what really happened. I loved that digging up the artifacts allowed everyone to learn more about the Earth's culture before the Healing and what caused the destruction. I liked the idea behind the Lex and how those rules were set down. I also enjoyed the fact that Eva's discovery challenges the status quo and what everyone believes to be true.

    Beyond being a great heroine based adventure story, Relic has a message. Perhaps sometimes we need people who think a little differently in our world. Being unique and different gives you a different perspective on the world at large. Don't always take what someone tells you as gospel. Search, investigate, think! I think this is a great start to a great series for teens and adults. I think Terrell does a great job of drawing the reader in and making them think.

    In short, I want my kids to read this book. I want them to explore their own ideas and broaden their horizons. This is the kind of novel that does that. Well done!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 5, 2013

    RELIC is compared to Game of Thrones and The Hunger Games. While

    RELIC is compared to Game of Thrones and The Hunger Games. While I have read Game of Thrones, I could definitely see how it is compared to The Hunger Games. The days of technology, also known as the PreHealing times, as long gone and the reader is transported to a world where the chief Archon rules for 10 years and then a Testing is held to select the next. While reading, you will come across a different vocabulary, but not one that is difficult to follow. It is during a time where women are Maidens and not expected to compete, but after Eva’s twin brother dies before the next Testing, Eva has a reason to enter and compete in his place.
    She prepares just like the others, granted not with the same amount of time, but being the only female to compete in the Testing for the first time in years, she proves herself to be strong and just as capable of overcoming the grueling Testing.
    RELIC combines elements of survival with that of a dystopian. It’s an interesting read that keeps you engrossed in the story every step of the way. As the story goes on, Eva begins to realize that the world in which she lives may not be all she thought it to be. Eve is a heroine to admire. She demonstrates strength, courage, and determination throughout the book. And of course, there is a love triangle between Eva, Jasper, and Lukas, but it doesn’t take over the story and could almost be described as a side story. I like that it doesn’t take away from the action and adventure that the Testing contains.
    As the first book in The Books of Eva series, RELIC sets up an interesting story and one that I am curious to read more about. It takes place in the frozen and dangerous Arctic, which is an entirely new setting for me as a reader. I am looking forward to continuing this series and finding out answers to some very important questions. You’ll have to read to find out what I mean… ;)  




    4.5 out of 5 stars! 

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 31, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Relic is a dysptopian story based on a post polar ice cap melt d

    Relic is a dysptopian story based on a post polar ice cap melt down turning the world into a second ice age. The story is about the people that survived this disaster and the society that they built. There is the people of the Aerie called the founders, these are people that escaped to this colony created for just such a disaster and there is the Inuit people, who serve as servants to the Founders but live outside their carefully planned city. Over time the religious beliefs have been warped by power and corruption and this story is about a young girl Eva's slow discovery into truth.




    The Testing is a ritual where the Founders send their children out into the arctic conditions, dog sleds and all, to uncover proof (relics) to show the evil lives of the pre-healed world. (Founders consider the flooding was the way the “gods” healed the world). Top prize is something apple.




    Eva seemed somewhat naïve in some respects but then progressive in others. I did have a little trouble validating her ability to survive with only a few months of training when her brother and the other contestants spent their entire lives preparing for the Testing.




    The premise is strong and the concept of apple being a “god” was completely original. Heather Terrell descriptive writing creates a clear image of a mid-evil yet futuristic world. Definitely written with more books in mind, Relic provides indepth insight into a new world and an interesting new series to follow.




    I received this ARC of Relic in exchange for a honest review. This book is set for publication October 29, 2013.








    Written by: Heather Terrell
    Series: Books of Eva
    Sequence in Series: 1
    Hardcover: 288 pages
    Publisher: Soho Teen 
    Publication Date: October 29, 2013
    ISBN-10: 1616951966
    ISBN-13: 978-1616951962
    Rating: 3.5 Stars
    Genre: Dystopia
    Age Recommendation: Teen +

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2014

    Fantastic! This is a great story.

    I just read Relic (finished it a few minutes ago, actually) and was stunned, yet amazed at the end. Eva goes through so much in such a short time. It's hard to understand Relic at first, as it's written to fit that time, but you begin to understand it after a few chapters. I thought the symbolism of Apple was kind of funny. The fact that they thought people worshipped Apple was just hysterical. <br>
    Overall, this was just an awesome story. I seriously hope there's going to be a sequel. Three cheers for Heather Terrell!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 30, 2013

    Excellent new fiction for young teens (or precocious tweens).  V

    Excellent new fiction for young teens (or precocious tweens).  Very compelling, adventurous fantasy. Great girl-lead!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 30, 2013

    Great dystopia for tweens! If your child read The Giver, or the

    Great dystopia for tweens!

    If your child read The Giver, or the Divergent series, this could be a great follow-up. It's a haunting tale of a girl in a bleak world, trying to unravel the history of her people, and trying to figure out who killer her brother. Good romance, but mostly adventure.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    Great book! Can't wait for the sequel, Boundary.

    Great book! Can't wait for the sequel, Boundary.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)