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Religion and the Self in Antiquity

Overview

Many recent studies have argued that the self is a modern invention, a concept developed in the last three centuries. Religion and the Self in Antiquity challenges that idea by presenting a series of studies that explore the origins, formation, and limits of the self within the religions of the ancient Mediterranean world. Drawing on recent work on the body, gender, sexuality, the anthropology of the senses, and power, contributors make a strong case that the history of the self does indeed begin in antiquity, ...

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Religion and the Self in Antiquity

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Overview

Many recent studies have argued that the self is a modern invention, a concept developed in the last three centuries. Religion and the Self in Antiquity challenges that idea by presenting a series of studies that explore the origins, formation, and limits of the self within the religions of the ancient Mediterranean world. Drawing on recent work on the body, gender, sexuality, the anthropology of the senses, and power, contributors make a strong case that the history of the self does indeed begin in antiquity, developing as Western religion itself developed.

Indiana University Press

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780253217967
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press
  • Publication date: 11/28/2005
  • Pages: 280
  • Product dimensions: 6.12 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 0.83 (d)

Meet the Author

David Brakke is Professor of Religious Studies and Adjunct Professor of History at Indiana University.

Michael L. Satlow is Associate Professor in the Program in Judaic Studies and the Department of Religious Studies at Brown University.

Steven Weitzman, the Abraham M. Ellis Professor of Hebrew and Semitic Languages and Literature at the University of Pennsylvania and director of the Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies, is a scholar of the Hebrew Bible and early Judaism whose most recent publications include Solomon: The Lure of Wisdom and a revised edition of The Jews: A History.

Indiana University Press

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Table of Contents

Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Part I. Seeking Religious Selves
1. Shifting Selves in Late Antiquity Patricia Cox Miller
2. The Search for the Elusive Self in Texts of the Hebrew Bible Saul M. Olyan
3. The Slave Self J. Albert Harrill
4. Prayer of the Queen: Esther's Religious Self in the Septuagint Esther Menn
5. Giving for a Return: Jewish Votive Offerings in Late Antiquity Michael L. Satlow
6. The Self in Artemidorus' Interpretation of Dreams Peter T. Struck
Part II. Sensing Religious Selves
7. Sensory Reform in Deuteronomy Steven Weitzman
8. Locating the Sensing Body: Perception and Religious Identity in Late Antiquity Susan Ashbrook Harvey
9. Dialogue and Deliberation: The Sensory Self in the Hymns of Romanos the Melodist Georgia Frank
Part III. Teaching Religious Selves
10. From Master of Wisdom to Spiritual Master in Late Antiquity Guy G. Stroumsa
11. The Beastly Body in Rabbinic Self-Formation Jonathan Schofer
12. Making Public the Monastic Life: Reading the Self in Evagrius Ponticus' Talking Back David Brakke
13. The Student Self in Late Antiquity Edward Watts
Contributors
Index

Indiana University Press

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