Religion in Schools

Overview

Over thirty-five years ago, Greenhaven Press began publishing the Opposing Viewpoints series to help students gain an awareness of current issues and develop critical thinking skills. The Introducing Issues with Opposing Viewpoints series continues that tradition, presenting a wealth of information on contemporary issues in a colorful, easy-to-read format. In addition to pro/con articles, each Introducing Issues with Opposing Viewpoints volume includes appealing features designed to help students understand die ...

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Overview

Over thirty-five years ago, Greenhaven Press began publishing the Opposing Viewpoints series to help students gain an awareness of current issues and develop critical thinking skills. The Introducing Issues with Opposing Viewpoints series continues that tradition, presenting a wealth of information on contemporary issues in a colorful, easy-to-read format. In addition to pro/con articles, each Introducing Issues with Opposing Viewpoints volume includes appealing features designed to help students understand die complexities of current issues:

Full-color photographs, charts, graphs, and cartoons supplement the text

Sidebars present easy-to-understand statistics

Engaging fact boxes provide at-a-glance information

Questions that focus on vocabulary aid reading comprehension

Glossary, annotated bibliography, websites, and organizations to contact supplement student research

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal

Gr 8 Up- Similar to books in the "Opposing Viewpoints" series, this work presents 16 articles for and against a controversial topic, but it also boasts numerous informative (and colorful) photos, graphs, and charts. It also includes fact boxes, comprehension questions at the beginning and end of each article, and annotated lists of books, Web sites, and pertinent organizations. The articles, which date from 2001 to 2007 and vary considerably in appeal and difficulty, address the topic generally and then tackle the issues of intelligent design and prayer. All can be found online (though Merino lists a Web site for only one of them); the book's main advantage is its preselection and additional resources. The book assumes a basic knowledge of Christianity. It uses terms such as nonsectarian, nondenominational, evangelism, secularism, Babel, animus, exegetes, and so on, and refers to the Lord's Prayer, King James Version, Good Friday, etc., with no explanation. Only a few key terms are defined in a concluding facts section. Alan Marzilli's Religion in Public Schools (Chelsea House, 2004) covers prayer, religious clubs, and evolution; rather than presenting articles, it summarizes each topic, with an emphasis on legal cases and decisions. Tom Head's bare-bones Religion and Education (Gale, 2005) collects 13 articles on vouchers, prayer, teaching about religion, creationism, the Pledge of Allegiance, and headscarf bans; it lacks study questions and illustrations.-Ann W. Moore, Schenectady County Public Library, NY

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Table of Contents

Foreword 5

Introduction 7

Chapter 1 Should Religion Be Allowed in Public Schools?

1 Public Schools Must Not Promote nor Inhibit Religion Charles C. Haynes Oliver Thomas 11

2 Public Schools Have Been Overly Sanitized of Religion John W. Whitehead 18

3 Public Schools Should Teach About Different Religions Michael Tracey 26

4 Public Schools Are Not Equipped to Teach About Different Religions Susan Jacoby 31

Chapter 2 Should Public Schools Teach Alternatives to Evolution?

1 Evolution Should Be Taught in Public Schools Without Alternatives Steven Newton 38

2 Criticism of Evolution Should Be Taught in Public Schools David Fowler 44

3 Scientific Creationism Should Be Taught in Public Schools Henry Morris III 49

4 Creationism Should Not Be Taught in Public Schools 55

National Academy of Sciences and Institute of Medicine of the National Academies

5 Intelligent Design Should Be Allowed to Be Taught in Public Schools Michael Reiss 62

6 Intelligent Design Does Not Belong in Science Classrooms Todd Huffman 69

Chapter 3 Should Public Schools Allow Religious Activities at School?

1 Voluntary Student Prayer Should Be Protected in Public Schools Robert C. Byrd 78

2 Prayer Should Not Be Allowed in Public Schools American Atheists 85

3 Religious Holiday Activities in Schools Must Be Educational and Inclusive Janet Pearson 91

4 Christian Religious Holidays Should Not Be Excluded from Public Life, Including Schools John Eidsmoe 96

Facts About Religion in Schools 102

Organizations to Contact 105

For Further Reading 111

Index 117

Picture Credits 122

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