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Religion In The Public Square / Edition 1

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Overview

This vigorous debate between two distinguished philosophers presents two views on a topic of worldwide importance: the role of religion in politics. Audi argues that citizens in a free democracy should distinguish religious and secular considerations and give them separate though related roles. Wolterstorff argues that religious elements are both appropriate in politics and indispensable to the vitality of a pluralistic democracy. Each philosopher first states his position in detail, then responds to and criticizes the opposing viewpoint. Written with engaging clarity, Religion in the Public Square will spur discussion among scholars, students, and citizens.

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Editorial Reviews

The Philosophical Review
An extremely valuable contribution on the place of religious ideas in our country's political life. . . . Clearly written and accessible . . . this book will greatly enrich both those seeking an introduction to the place of religious conviction in political life and those who have already engaged that troubling subject.
— Kent Greenwalt, Columbia University Law School
The Journal Of Religion
Audi and Wolterstorff have provided us with a robust exchange, one that is accessible to a wide audience yet sophisticated enough to appeal to specialists in the field. As political theorists and philosophers continue to take up these issues, they would be wise to turn to this text for guidance on how to understand these questions from the perspective of contemporary philosophers of religion.
— Brett T. Wilmot, Chicago, Illinois
Ethics and Medicine
Anyone wanting a deeper understanding of the philosophical issues at stake in the debate between liberal neutrality and faith-based morality needs to study this book carefully.
Religious Studies Review
The book is of a model clarity , careful thinking, and reasoned dialogue. It makes a valuable contribution to the religion and liberalism debate.
Andrews University Seminary Studies
Audi and Wolterstoff demonstrate the complex realities surrounding religious and political arguments concerning the need for a consistent ethical rationale for determining the proper presence of religious principles in political debate. Their arguments highlight the contemporary dialogue between political liberalism and theologically based responses.
Terrorism and Political Violence
This book is a carefully reasoned and temperate discussion on both sides. It deserves to be read by all concerned about issues of church and state.
The Journal of Religion
Audi and Wolterstorff have provided us with a robust exchange, one that is accessible to a wide audience yet sophisticated enough to appeal to specialists in the field. As political theorists and philosophers continue to take up these issues, they would be wise to turn to this text for guidance on how to understand these questions from the perspective of contemporary philosophers of religion.
— Brett T. Wilmot, Chicago, Illinois
The Philosophical Review - Kent Greenwalt
An extremely valuable contribution on the place of religious ideas in our country's political life. . . . Clearly written and accessible . . . this book will greatly enrich both those seeking an introduction to the place of religious conviction in political life and those who have already engaged that troubling subject.
Michael J. Perry
Robert Audi and Nicholas Wolterstorff are two of the most thoughtful voices in the contemporary debate about the proper role of religion in politics. Their book, Religion In The Public Square, makes an important contribution. I recommend it highly.
Teaching Philosophy, September 1998 - Jacqueline Marina
The book presents two sides to the question of the role of religion in the public square. Both positions are well argued, informed and clearly presented. While the book's clarity makes it an excellent source for an undergraduate course, it does such a good job of bringing out key issues that it stands as a contribution to an understanding of the foundations of liberal democracy valuable in its own right.
The Journal Of Religion - Brett T. Wilmot
Audi and Wolterstorff have provided us with a robust exchange, one that is accessible to a wide audience yet sophisticated enough to appeal to specialists in the field. As political theorists and philosophers continue to take up these issues, they would be wise to turn to this text for guidance on how to understand these questions from the perspective of contemporary philosophers of religion.
Charles Larmore
Singly and by their disagreements, Audi and Wolterstorff show how complex is the issue of what role religious convictions may play in the public life of liberal democracies. Their debate is itself a model of the richer political discussion our society needs.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Robert Audi is Charles J. Mach Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the University of Nebraska, the author of numerous books and articles, and the editor of The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy. Nicholas Wolterstorff is Noah Porter Professor of Philosophical Theology at Yale University and the author of, among other books, Divine Discourse and John Locke and the Ethics of Belief.

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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Liberal Democracy and the Place of Religion in Politics Chapter 2 Separation of Church and State as Addressed to the State Chapter 3 The Libertarian Principle Chapter 4 The Equalitarian Principle Chapter 5 The Neutrality Principle Chapter 6 Religious Obligation and Political Conduct Chapter 7 Grounds and Dimensions of Religious Obligation Chapter 8 The Mutual Independence of Religious Sources of Obligation Chapter 9 Connections among Religious and Secular Source Chapter 10 Civic Virtue and Religious Conviction Chapter 11 Civic Virtue Chapter 12 Religious Commitment and Moral Obligation Chapter 13 Theo-ethical Equilibrium Chapter 14 Some Principles and Practices of Civic Virtue Chapter 15 Secular Rationale Chapter 16 Secular Motivation Chapter 17 Civic Voice Chapter 18 The Mutual Integration of Civic and Religious Virtues Chapter 19 The Principle of Theo-ethical Equilibrium Chapter 20 Separation of Church and State as Addressed to the Church Chapter 21 Ecclesiastical Neutrality Chapter 22 Clerical Neutrality Chapter 23 Some Problems of Application Chapter 24 The Role of Religion in Decision and Discussion of Political Issues Chapter 25 The Role of Citizen and Its Ethics Chapter 26 What Is a Liberal Democracy? The Liberal Position Chapter 27 The Ethic of the Citizen and Restraints on Reason Chapter 28 Are Religious Reasons too Dangerous to Permit? Locke's Version of the Liberal Position Chapter 29 Rawl's Attempt to Identify the independent Source Chapter 30 Does the Source Yield the Principles needed? Is It Fair to Ask Everyone to Use the Source? Rawl's Rationale Chapter 31 What Does Respect Require? No Restraint on Religious Reasons Chapter 32 Do We Need Consensus? The Consocial Position Chapter 33 Application to Public Officials Chapter 34 Wolterstorff on Religion Chapter 35 Liberalism and Religion Chapter 36 Wolterstorff's Critique of the Liberalism of Locke and Rawls Chapter 37 Wolterstorff's Positive View of Religion and Politics Chapter 38 Audi on Religion, Politics, and Liberal Democracy Chapter 39 Audi's Version of the Liberal Position Chapter 40 Audi's Rationale Chapter 41 Evaluation of the Rationale Chapter 42 Audi's Independent Source Chapter 43 In Summary Chapter 44 Religion, Politics, and Democracy: Closing Comments and Remaining Issues Chapter 45 The Scope of Impartiality Chapter 46 Consensus versus Majority Preference as Democratic Standards Chapter 47 The Justification of Coercion Chapter 48 Liberal Democracy and Mutual Respect Chapter 49 Secular Reasons and Secular Motivation Chapter 50 Index

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