Religious Expression and the American Constitution (Rhetoric and Public Affairs Series)

Religious Expression and the American Constitution (Rhetoric and Public Affairs Series)

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by Franklyn S. Haiman
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0870136917

ISBN-13: 9780870136917

Pub. Date: 10/28/2003

Publisher: Michigan State University Press

First Amendment rights have been among the most fiercely debated topics in the aftermath of 9/11. In the current environment and fervor for “homeland security,” personal freedoms in exchange for security are coming under more scrutiny. Among these guaranteed freedoms are the protection of religious expression given by the U.S. Constitution and the

Overview

First Amendment rights have been among the most fiercely debated topics in the aftermath of 9/11. In the current environment and fervor for “homeland security,” personal freedoms in exchange for security are coming under more scrutiny. Among these guaranteed freedoms are the protection of religious expression given by the U.S. Constitution and the constitutional prohibitions against behaviors that violate the separation of church and state. The mandate that the government “shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof” is a general principle that has guided American courts in interpreting the original intent of the First Amendment. In Religious Expression and the American Constitution, Haiman focuses on the current state of American law with respect to a broad range of controversial issues affecting religious expression, both verbal and nonverbal, along with a review of the recent history of each issue to provide a full understanding.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780870136917
Publisher:
Michigan State University Press
Publication date:
10/28/2003
Series:
Rhetoric and Public Affairs Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
254
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.60(d)

Table of Contents

Prefaceix
Chapter 1Historical Background1
Chapter 2Understanding the First Amendment11
Chapter 3Religious Expression in Public Places25
Chapter 4Religious Expression in Public Schools43
Chapter 5Public Funding of Religious Schools69
Chapter 6Historical Issues of Religious Expression versus Competing Social Interests89
Chapter 7Current Issues of Religious Expression versus Competing Social Interests109
Chapter 8Religious Expression and Political Life127
Appendix 1Roger Williams's Bloudy Tenent of Persecution141
Appendix 2The General Laws and Liberties of the Massachusetts Colony143
Appendix 3Maryland Act Concerning Religion145
Appendix 4John Locke's Letter Concerning Toleration149
Appendix 5Jefferson's Notes on Virginia159
Appendix 6James Madison's Memorial and Remonstrance against Religious Assessments161
Appendix 7Virginia Act for Establishing Religious Freedom167
Appendix 8Thomas Jefferson's Reply to the Danbury Baptist Association169
Appendix 9Engel v Vitale171

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Religious Expression and the American Constitution (Rhetoric and Public Affairs Series) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book Religious Expression and the American Constitution by Franklyn S. Haiman discusses many points of current debate dealing with religious expression and interpretation of the laws concerning that expression. The book is written for any reader interested in American legal matters, and is intended to persuade the reader to support pluralism in the United States. This book cites relevant court cases in summarized form, and the cases are cited as appendices after the initial eight chapters which discuss them. The author uses citations from Amendments as well. Perhaps the most notable aspect of Haiman¿s writing throughout this entire book is his intent to present as many opposing sides as possible to these issues. I consider the book a legal study that includes much of the necessary history to become familiar with the topic. I recommend the text to any higher education student as a reference material, or to any reader interested in political issues as an armchair read.