Remake

( 8 )

Overview

Winner of more Hugo and Nebula Awards than any other science fiction author, Connie Willis is one of the most powerfully imaginative writers of our time. In Remake, she explores the timeless themes of emotion and technology, reality and illusion, and the bittersweet place where they intersect to make art.

Remake

It's the Hollywood of the future, where moviemaking's been computerized and live-action films are a thing of the past. It's a ...

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Remake

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Overview

Winner of more Hugo and Nebula Awards than any other science fiction author, Connie Willis is one of the most powerfully imaginative writers of our time. In Remake, she explores the timeless themes of emotion and technology, reality and illusion, and the bittersweet place where they intersect to make art.

Remake

It's the Hollywood of the future, where moviemaking's been computerized and live-action films are a thing of the past. It's a Hollywood where Humphrey Bogart and Marilyn Monroe are starring together in A Star Is Born, and if you don't like the ending, you can change it with the stroke of a key.

A Hollywood of warmbodies and sim-sex, of drugs and special effects, where anything is possible. Except for what one starry-eyed young woman wants to do: dance in the movies. It's an impossible dream, but Alis is not willing to give up. With a little magic and a lot of luck, she just might get her happy ending after all.

From the Paperback edition.

Remake depicts a film industry that no longer creates original movies, but uses computer technology to remake old stories from existing footage. It's a Hollywood of simulated sex, drugs, and special effects, where anything is possible--except for Alis's dream of dancing in the movies.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Another brilliant work by an author deserving of the praise and awards heaped upon her."

-- Des Moines Sunday Register

From the Paperback edition.

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Willis (Doomsday Book), a fan of old movies, uses them cleverly and thoughtfully in Remake, her fourth solo novel. Roughly 20 years into the future, computer graphics have ended live production in Hollywood. Tom, the narrator, reluctantly pillages old films for remakes starring dead actors or alters them to suit the politico-social correctness of the moment. When he meets Alis, who has come to Hollywood burning to dance in movies no longer being made, he falls hard. As in Willis's Lincoln's Dreams, while boy is obsessed with girl, she is obsessed with her purpose. Boy loses girl, then sees her, impossibly, dancing in old musicals which couldn't have been altered. After several red herrings he finds both her and an explanation, but, given her higher passion, finders aren't necessarily keepers. Willis's writing, as usual, is transparently clean and deft. She has fun playing with old film references and with the levels of illusion in a Hollywood more irreal than ever, and is discerning both about the way movies inform our imaginations, giving us roles to play, and about desire, purpose and possibility. One flaw is a scene of requited love that neither the form nor tone of this bittersweet romance can support. But if the characters are mostly stock and the sentimentality easy, this is still popular fiction at a high level, entertaining, thoughtful and often touching. (Feb.)
Library Journal
The 21st century's film industry is as big as ever, but there are no live actors to speak of and no new movies, only remakes controlled by F/X wizards who rely on technological sleight-of-hand to simulate creativity. Against this backdrop of soulless glitz and surface glamour, Willis (The Doomsday Book, LJ 5/15/92) tells the story of Alis, a dancer who wants to be in the movies (as herself, not a "remake"), and Tom, an F/X technician who tries to make her dream come true although doing so will make his dream impossible. Willis has established a reputation as one of sf's most lucid writers, and her latest effort demonstrates a rare capacity for evoking both humor and regret. Most libraries should acquire this title.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780553374377
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 5/28/2000
  • Pages: 172
  • Sales rank: 693,781
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.35 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 8 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 24, 2011

    I wanted to edit the ending.

    I wanted the protagonist to end up with the other woman. Sorry Connie!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 6, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Good, but not her best...

    There is a lot to recommend in this book. It's fun, it presents a lot of ideas and (Especially towards the end) puts some really well realized characters in front of the reader. But, unfortunately, that may not be enough. The plot simply does not have the forward momentum of Willis's other books and it sometimes feels like she is running in place.

    All that said, I enjoyed it and didn't regret buying the book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2001

    Don't Judge Willis by this

    The problem is there's a lot of good and funny ideas in this book but there's really no payoff. I really felt a bit cheated by the ending. She's a good writer, that's what made me buy this, but this one just didn't seem to work for me. 'Lincoln's Dreams' works better, read it instead.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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    Posted March 2, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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