Remake

Remake

3.7 8
by Connie Willis
     
 

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Winner of more Hugo and Nebula Awards than any other science fiction author, Connie Willis is one of the most powerfully imaginative writers of our time. In Remake, she explores the timeless themes of emotion and technology, reality and illusion, and the bittersweet place where they intersect to make art.

Remake

It's the Hollywood of the future, where moviemaking

Overview

Winner of more Hugo and Nebula Awards than any other science fiction author, Connie Willis is one of the most powerfully imaginative writers of our time. In Remake, she explores the timeless themes of emotion and technology, reality and illusion, and the bittersweet place where they intersect to make art.

Remake

It's the Hollywood of the future, where moviemaking's been computerized and live-action films are a thing of the past. It's a Hollywood where Humphrey Bogart and Marilyn Monroe are starring together in A Star Is Born, and if you don't like the ending, you can change it with the stroke of a key.

A Hollywood of warmbodies and sim-sex, of drugs and special effects, where anything is possible. Except for what one starry-eyed young woman wants to do: dance in the movies. It's an impossible dream, but Alis is not willing to give up. With a little magic and a lot of luck, she just might get her happy ending after all.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Willis (Doomsday Book), a fan of old movies, uses them cleverly and thoughtfully in Remake, her fourth solo novel. Roughly 20 years into the future, computer graphics have ended live production in Hollywood. Tom, the narrator, reluctantly pillages old films for remakes starring dead actors or alters them to suit the politico-social correctness of the moment. When he meets Alis, who has come to Hollywood burning to dance in movies no longer being made, he falls hard. As in Willis's Lincoln's Dreams, while boy is obsessed with girl, she is obsessed with her purpose. Boy loses girl, then sees her, impossibly, dancing in old musicals which couldn't have been altered. After several red herrings he finds both her and an explanation, but, given her higher passion, finders aren't necessarily keepers. Willis's writing, as usual, is transparently clean and deft. She has fun playing with old film references and with the levels of illusion in a Hollywood more irreal than ever, and is discerning both about the way movies inform our imaginations, giving us roles to play, and about desire, purpose and possibility. One flaw is a scene of requited love that neither the form nor tone of this bittersweet romance can support. But if the characters are mostly stock and the sentimentality easy, this is still popular fiction at a high level, entertaining, thoughtful and often touching. (Feb.)
Library Journal
The 21st century's film industry is as big as ever, but there are no live actors to speak of and no new movies, only remakes controlled by F/X wizards who rely on technological sleight-of-hand to simulate creativity. Against this backdrop of soulless glitz and surface glamour, Willis (The Doomsday Book, LJ 5/15/92) tells the story of Alis, a dancer who wants to be in the movies (as herself, not a "remake"), and Tom, an F/X technician who tries to make her dream come true although doing so will make his dream impossible. Willis has established a reputation as one of sf's most lucid writers, and her latest effort demonstrates a rare capacity for evoking both humor and regret. Most libraries should acquire this title.
Carl Hays
On her way to winning several Hugo and Nebula awards, Willis has exercised her uniquely witty imagination on subjects as diverse as time travel and Abraham Lincoln. Now Hollywood becomes fair game for her in a whimsical preview of a twenty-first-century Tinseltown obsessed with remakes. Exploiting his complete access to state-of-the-art video technology, Tom is a jaded film student moonlighting as a touch-up artist for a brownnosing junior studio exec. Between digitally deleting liquor bottles from "Casablanca" and then "Notorious" in order to appease a teetotaling producer, Tom meets Alis, a naive movie star wanna-be whose only dream is to dance in silver screen musicals. Alas for Alis, as Tom repeatedly emphasizes, musicals have been dead for decades and live performers displaced by digital ones. Yet, incredibly enough, and to Tom's inebriated befuddlement, Alis' face and physique begin materializing onscreen with Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly in licensed musical classics. Willis drolly combines current Hollywood stereotypes of couch-hopping, pill-popping studio patrons with a wry prediction of film technology's future. Ingenious fun from one of sf's preeminent wags.
From the Publisher
"Another brilliant work by an author deserving of the praise and awards heaped upon her."

-- Des Moines Sunday Register

From the Paperback edition.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780929480480
Publisher:
Ziesing, Mark V.
Publication date:
12/28/1994
Edition description:
1st ed.]
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
6.09(w) x 9.32(h) x 1.26(d)

Meet the Author

Connie Willis is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. She has won eleven Hugo Awards and seven Nebula Awards, including Hugo Best Novel for Blackout/All Clear in 2010. Willis' novels showcase the comedy of manner style of writing and often feature time travel, which are informally referred to as the Time Travel series. In addition to numerous novels and novellas, Willis has written short story and essay collections. Her notable books include Doomsday Book, To Say Nothing of the Dog, the aforementioned Blackout/All Clear, and the short story "The Last of the Winnebagos".

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Remake 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
AegonNJ More than 1 year ago
I wanted the protagonist to end up with the other woman. Sorry Connie!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
wookietim More than 1 year ago
There is a lot to recommend in this book. It's fun, it presents a lot of ideas and (Especially towards the end) puts some really well realized characters in front of the reader. But, unfortunately, that may not be enough. The plot simply does not have the forward momentum of Willis's other books and it sometimes feels like she is running in place. All that said, I enjoyed it and didn't regret buying the book.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
The problem is there's a lot of good and funny ideas in this book but there's really no payoff. I really felt a bit cheated by the ending. She's a good writer, that's what made me buy this, but this one just didn't seem to work for me. 'Lincoln's Dreams' works better, read it instead.