Remember Pearl Harbor: Japanese and American Survivors Tell Their Stories

Remember Pearl Harbor: Japanese and American Survivors Tell Their Stories

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by Thomas B. Allen
     
 

This landmark volume will provide young readers with valuable insights into both the Japanese and American points of view and demonstrate why people on both sides feel the need to remember Pearl Harbor. 

Many people today still remember the infamous morning of December 7, 1941. Compelling narrative laced with first-person accounts from both American and

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Overview

This landmark volume will provide young readers with valuable insights into both the Japanese and American points of view and demonstrate why people on both sides feel the need to remember Pearl Harbor. 

Many people today still remember the infamous morning of December 7, 1941. Compelling narrative laced with first-person accounts from both American and Japanese survivors combines with dramatic archival images and a brief overview to paint a vivid portrait of what it was like to have witnessed, participated in, and lived through the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor.

Editorial Reviews

VOYA
We lived "The Star Spangled Banner" that night—"the rockets' red glare and the bombs bursting in air," recalls one sailor remembering the American flag still flying on the sunken USS California amid the fiery chaos that fateful day in 1941, when Japan attacked the United States Pacific fleet in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and plunged the country into World War II. In words still awe-stricken from painful, deeply imbedded memories, survivors tell their vivid recollections of the unprecedented events that turned lives upside down and changed the course of America's history. Among the survivors mentioned are several American sailors, an army nurse, and the wife of a U.S. Marine lieutenant. Japanese sailors and pilots, whose accounts give special insight into how the surprise attacks were carried out, are also included. The gripping tales and sharp, dramatic photographs create a strong sense of place with a powerful visual immediacy that transports the reader back to a day that began in clear sunshine and ended in carnage and heartache. Of particular interest are the detailed World War II time line and the postscripts that give updates on the various survivors. This well-documented, absorbing book will give teens not only a brief but important review of the sequence of events that led to America's entry into the second World War, but also a close look at the widespread human suffering, the awful devastation, and the ultimate senselessness of war. Index. Illus. Photos. Maps. Charts. Biblio. VOYA CODES: 4Q 3P M J S (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Will appeal with pushing; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High,defined as grades 10 to 12). 2001, National Geographic Society, 57p, $17.95. Ages 11 to 18. Reviewer: Delia A. Culberson
School Library Journal
Gr 4 Up-In this effective narrative built from first-person oral histories, striking photographs are combined with excellent maps, resulting in a sophisticated design. The arresting visuals are the foil for powerful tales of warfare, destruction, and patriotism. A noteworthy foreword is followed by accounts of American sailors such as Clark Simmons, who was awakened on December 7, 1941, by explosions outside his battleship, and others, including that of Haruo Yoshino, who was among the Japanese pilots dropping the torpedoes. Both sides of this dramatic story are humanized and fairly presented in a sound, historical context. Interesting postscripts follow up on several of the individuals highlighted, and a unique time line integrates a minute-by-minute account of the attack with a more general one of the Pacific and European conflicts. This compelling title will be of interest to general readers and is an ideal resource for units on World War II.-Andrew Medlar, Chicago Public Library, IL Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Allen skillfully blends background information and eyewitness accounts from Japanese pilots, American servicemen, and nurses in this copiously illustrated addition to the canon of books commemorating December 7, 1941. Japanese pilots and submarine crew recall their intensive training in the months prior to December. Americans on board destroyers and battleships remember where they were when the first explosions ripped apart their ships. An army nurse talks about the smell of burning oil on a base previously scented with gardenias and hibiscus. Allen also writes briefly about the memorials on Hawaii, the American internment of Japanese, and the Americans of Japanese ancestry who fought so gallantly in Europe. Detailed physical and political maps and a timeline help readers follow the events of the day and of WWII. While Allen refers to issues relating to codes, code-breaking, and delays in delivery of messages, his focus is primarily on providing a "you-are-there" feeling for readers and a connection to the pervading sense of bewilderment, fear, and courage exhibited by those whose lives were threatened. A handsome title that will appeal to WWII buffs. Includes Web sites, bibliography, index, and a foreword by the diver Robert D. Ballard. (Nonfiction. 8-12)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780792266907
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Publication date:
05/28/2001
Series:
Remember Series
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
9.50(w) x 10.62(h) x 0.47(d)
Lexile:
820L (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 - 13 Years

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