Remember the Distance That Divides Us: The Family Letters of Philadelphia Quaker Abolitionist and Michigan Pioneer Elizabeth Margaret Chandler, 1830-1842

Overview

Born in Delaware’s Brandywine Valley in 1807, Elizabeth Margaret Chandler was a young woman who was fully engaged in her time. Leaving comfort and middle-class Philadelphia wealth behind, she headed west in 1830 with brother, Thomas, and an aunt to begin a new life in the wilderness of the Michigan Territory. During the next four years, until her untimely death in November 1834, Chandler became a tireless local activist; at the same time, she participated aggressively in national political discussions about ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$35.32
BN.com price
(Save 17%)$42.95 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (9) from $16.42   
  • New (2) from $26.62   
  • Used (7) from $16.42   
Sending request ...

Overview

Born in Delaware’s Brandywine Valley in 1807, Elizabeth Margaret Chandler was a young woman who was fully engaged in her time. Leaving comfort and middle-class Philadelphia wealth behind, she headed west in 1830 with brother, Thomas, and an aunt to begin a new life in the wilderness of the Michigan Territory. During the next four years, until her untimely death in November 1834, Chandler became a tireless local activist; at the same time, she participated aggressively in national political discussions about pressing social issues, in particular in the dialogue about the nascent women’s movement and in the debates about Abolitionism as they began to develop in the 1820s and early 1830s. She was ladies’ editor of Benjamin Lundy’s Abolitionist Journal and a contemporary of William Lloyd Garrison. She wrote letters, articles, and poetry that appeared in the Abolitionist press, but at the same time she was a champion for public education at the local level. Within two years of her arrival in Michigan, she had established the territory’s first anti-slave organization, the Logan Female Antislavery Society. 
      This rich collection of personal letters, most written to family members during Chandler’s brief life in Michigan, provides a remarkable view of the Northwest frontier in the 1830s, as well as profound insights into the ideology and origins of Abolitionism. Her letters also reveal much about the beliefs, attitudes, and actions of a remarkable young woman who some have seen as a precursor to the Grimké sisters.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780870137136
  • Publisher: Michigan State University Press
  • Publication date: 8/28/2004
  • Pages: 458
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 1.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Marcia Heringa Mason is a museum administrator with an interest in the lives of nineteenth-century women. She has held positions at the Edsel and Eleanor Ford House, the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village, and the Desert Caballeros Western Museum.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix
Editor's Notes xiii
Introduction xv
Chapter 1 Preparing to Remove, 1830 1
Chapter 2 Arrival and Adjustment, 1830 9
Chapter 3 Settling In, 1831 43
Chapter 4 A Year of Growth, 1832 89
Chapter 5 A Year of Waiting, 1833 157
Chapter 6 Major Changes, 1834 219
Chapter 7 Matters of Life and Death, 1835-1837 261
Chapter 8 Life Goes On, 1838-1842 317
Epilogue 345
Appendix 1 Directory of Names 347
Appendix 2 Poems by Elizabeth Chandler 365
Appendix 3 Poems to Elizabeth Chandler 383
Appendix 4 Elizabeth Margaret Chandler's Recipe for Honey Tea Cake 387
Appendix 5 Inventory of Minnie C. M. Fay's Household Effects, October 29, 1935 389
Notes 391
Bibliography 429
Index 435
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 22, 2009

    Collected letters by and to early woman abolitionist

    Numerous letters to and from Elizabeth Margaret Chandler not only provide incomparable knowledge about the early days of the abolitionist movement, but also American Midwestern society of the time. One of the appendices is a list of the household effects relating to Chandler. But the book is of interest mostly for the sympathies and activities of the young Elizabeth Chandler regarding the issue of abolition. She died in 1834 before she was 30. The letters are written in the now-archaic language used by the Quakers of the time--e. g., 'I thank thee my dear Elizabeth for thy large sheet or sheets so well filled for I believe there are several of thy letters yet unanswered by me...,' from a lengthy letter by Chandler's aunt to her. The length of many of the letters, which go on for three or more pages, imparts to an exceptional degree the thoughts and activities of the individuals as well as their relationships with others. In her short life spent mostly in Michigan, Chandler contributed much to raising the consciousness of the region about the issue of abolition. The founder of the Logan Female Antislavery Society, she is also seen as an early activist in the fledgling women's movement. When she died, some individuals were moved to write poems about her. These are included in another appendix. The voluminous and varied materials brought together with editor Mason's deft sense of organization and worthiness is not only an invaluable source book on the little-known but influential Chadler; but it is a rich picture of individuals and their involvement in a major social issue of the time as well as their ordinary, daily activities and concerns. From the length and depth of the letters of Chandler and others she communicated with, the reader becomes involved with them as if they were subjects of a biography or characters in a historical novel.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)