Reminiscences of a Stock Operator, Illustrated Edition

( 1 )

Overview

"After 20 years and many re-reads, Reminiscences is still one of my all-time favorites."
–Kenneth L. Fisher, Forbes

The most important investment book for today's investors isn't on the hottest new trend--it's a book written over 70 years ago. Originally published in 1923, Reminiscences of a Stock Operator continues to inspire each new generation of investors. Written by the author of The Making of a Stockbroker.

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Overview

"After 20 years and many re-reads, Reminiscences is still one of my all-time favorites."
–Kenneth L. Fisher, Forbes

The most important investment book for today's investors isn't on the hottest new trend--it's a book written over 70 years ago. Originally published in 1923, Reminiscences of a Stock Operator continues to inspire each new generation of investors. Written by the author of The Making of a Stockbroker.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780471678762
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 10/28/2004
  • Series: A Marketplace Book Series , #175
  • Edition description: Illustrated Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 196,925
  • Product dimensions: 8.60 (w) x 11.26 (h) x 0.74 (d)

Meet the Author

Edwin Lefèvre was trained as a mining engineer, but became a journalist at age nineteen. He produced eight books, including The Making of a Stockbroker, during his 53-year writing career. He is a celebrated finance author made famous by his publication of the fictionalized story of Jesse Livermore, which first appeared in The Saturday Evening Post in 1922.

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Table of Contents

Foreword.

Introduction.

I. The Biggest Plunger Wall Street Ever Saw: June 10, 1922.

II. The Boy Trader Beats the Bucket Shops: June 17, 1922.

III. I Was Dead Right-I Lost Ever Cent I Had: July 1, 1922.

IV. The Quarter Million Dollar Hunch: July 15, 1922.

V. My Day of Days: August 12, 1922.

VI. No Man Living  Can Beat the Stock Market: Sept. 2, 1922.

VII. Playing Another Man's Game: Sept 16, 1922.

VIII. $1 Million in Debt; $1 Million Repaid: Oct. 7, 1922.

IX. Black Cats and Irresistible Impulses: Oct. 21, 1922.

X. The Coffee Corner and the Price Fixing Committee: Dec. 16, 1922.

XI. Why the Public Always Loses: May 19, 1923.

XII. Kings, Paupers, and the Hazards of the Game: May 26, 1923.

Publisher's Postscript.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2004

    Traders way of life

    'Reminiscence's 1923 copyright ran out a long time ago. In the early 80's Wells Wilder invited me to meet the legendary trader Stanley Kroll in Los Angeles. Stanley had quotes from Reminiscence all over the place. Stanley emphasized the lessons Livermore learned from Partridge in the 5th chapter of the book. Here is where Kroll learned how to make consistent profits trading commodities. It was Kroll's who resurrected the long out of print scrolls. In any case Jack Schwager did a Napoleon Hill of commodities traders. Jack asked the traders. The majority said 'Reminiscences,' was influential in there trading. It is no surprise that all the old timers claimed to read the same stuff! What I find about trading for a living is that there is really no one you can share your experience with without having him or her influence your trading. One thing is for sure, whoever wrote 'Reminiscences,' knew an awful lot about the development of Jesse's trading philosophy. Reminiscences does not delve into chart reading or technical analyses. It was before that. Livermore's genius is that Reminiscences lives today eighty years later, as a 'traders mind mirror.' 'Reminiscences,' echoes back your own thoughts reflected off of the mind of one of America's greatest securities traders. If you are new to the path or have lost your way, or just need a re-entry from a trading break. Reminiscences unfolds the philosophical foundation underlying 'a way of life as a trader.' No matter what your level of trading experience, if you are still alive 'Reminiscences of a stock Operator,' has something to offer you.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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