Reminiscences of Fort Sumter and Moultrie

Overview

Abner Doubleday was an 1842 graduate of the U. S. Military Academy at West Point and a veteran of the Mexican War when he was assigned to Fort Moultrie in the summer of 1860. A Captain of Artillery, he served as second in command of the garrison at the historic fort when the curtain rose of the dramatic events leading to the outbreak of the war between the states. Doubleday also had the distinction of aiming the first cannon fired in response to the bombardment of Fort Sumter.

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Overview

Abner Doubleday was an 1842 graduate of the U. S. Military Academy at West Point and a veteran of the Mexican War when he was assigned to Fort Moultrie in the summer of 1860. A Captain of Artillery, he served as second in command of the garrison at the historic fort when the curtain rose of the dramatic events leading to the outbreak of the war between the states. Doubleday also had the distinction of aiming the first cannon fired in response to the bombardment of Fort Sumter.

From letters, memoranda and documents, Doubleday writes of his own recollections of the turbulent days of 1860 and 1861, and when placed upon him to give his own opinion he endeavored to do so in the spirit of Abraham Lincoln's immortal sentiment.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781582182797
  • Publisher: Digital Scanning, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 12/28/2000
  • Pages: 192
  • Product dimensions: 5.54 (w) x 8.48 (h) x 0.55 (d)

Table of Contents

Chapter I. Fort Moultrie in 1860 13
The Garrison of Fort Moultrie
Early Indications of Secession
Situation of the Fort
Edmund Ruffin and Robert Barnwell Rhett
The Secretary of War
Arms sent to the South
Colonel Gardner
Captain Foster ordered to Charleston Harbor
The Officers at Fort Moultrie
Communications with Northern Men by Cipher
Proscription of Antislavery Men in Charleston
Position of Charleston Merchants
The Secession Leaders only prepared to resist Coercion
The Mob proves Unmanageable
General Scott's Letter to the President, October 29th
The Situation in November
No Instructions from Washington
Colonel Gardner's Report to General Wool
Chapter II. Preparations for Defense 30
Defeat of Captain Seymour's Expedition on the Ashley
Mayor Macbeth's Explanation
Captain Foster's Work on Fort Moultrie
Governor Gist convenes the South Carolina Legislature
Creation of a Standing Army
Arrival of Masons from Baltimore
Situation of Fort Sumter
A Dramatic Incident
Secretary Floyd's Action
Horace Greeley's Advocacy of the Right of Secession
The Situation November 18th
Chapter III. Preliminary Movements of the Secessionists 41
Arrival of Major Anderson
Huger's Opposition to a Premature Assault on Fort Moultrie
Anderson's Report to the Secretary of War
Active Preparations by the South Carolinians
Meeting of Congress
Attempts at Compromise
Secession Batteries at Mount Pleasant
Arrival of Major Buell with Written Orders
Vain Efforts to Strengthen Castle Pinckney
Northern Opinion
Public Meeting in Philadelphia
Chapter IV. The Removal to Fort Sumter 55
Passage of the Secession Ordinance
Governor Pickens's Proclamation
Judge Petigru's Visit to Fort Moultrie
Floyd's Treachery
Yancey's Lectures in the North
The Removal to Sumter
Chapter V. The First Overt Act 68
The New Quarters
Seizure of Castle Pinckney by Charleston Troops
Raising the Flag at Fort Sumter
The Sergeant's Daughter
Major Anderson's Position
The Charleston Troops take Fort Moultrie
A Military Problem
Condition of Fort Sumter
Governor Pickens's Commission
A New Outrage
Chapter VI. Effect of Anderson's Movement 82
President Buchanan Aroused
Excitement in Charleston
The Situation at the Beginning of 1861
Governor Pickens's War Measures
"My heart was never in this War"
Chapter VII. The "Star of the West" 92
Promise of Succor
Fatal Delay
A Contumacious Chaplain
Visit from our Ladies
Governor Pickens's Cabinet
Appearance of the Star of the West
The Vessel fired upon from Morris Island and Fort Moultrie
Major Anderson's Protest
Governor Pickens's Reply
Chapter VIII. A Resort to Diplomacy 107
Major Anderson's Proposed Diplomatic Negotiations
Defensive Preparations
Changes in the Cabinet
Meade's Defection
Anecdote of Governor Pickens
Battery at Cummings Point
Soldiers' Families Removed
A Threatening Letter
Confederate Visitors to the Fort
Organization of the Confederate Government
Chapter IX. The Crisis at Hand 123
South Carolina's Grievances
Inauguration of President Lincoln
Determination to Re-enforce Sumter
An Audacious Proposal
The Shannon
New Rebel Batteries Unmasked
Formal Notice of Bombardment
Chapter X. The Bombardment 143
The First Shot
Defective Guns
John Carmody's Exploit
Destructive Effects of the Bombardment
Burning of the Officers' Quarters
Terrific Conflagration
Chapter XI. The Evacuation 161
Senator Wigfall's Volunteer Mission
Terms of Evacuation Settled
The Question of Casualties on the Other Side
Salute to the Flag
Occupation of the Fort by Southern Troops
Embarkation
Welcome in New York
Conclusion
Appendix 179
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