Remoting Patterns: Foundations of Enterprise, Internet and Realtime Distributed Object Middleware [NOOK Book]

Overview

Remoting offers developers many ways to customize the communications process, for efficiency, security, performance and power, and allows seamless integration of components running on several computers into a single application. This book exposes the full power of remoting to developers working in mixed platform environments in a way that will ensure they have a deep understanding of what remoting is capable of, and how they can make it work the way they want.
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Remoting Patterns: Foundations of Enterprise, Internet and Realtime Distributed Object Middleware

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Overview

Remoting offers developers many ways to customize the communications process, for efficiency, security, performance and power, and allows seamless integration of components running on several computers into a single application. This book exposes the full power of remoting to developers working in mixed platform environments in a way that will ensure they have a deep understanding of what remoting is capable of, and how they can make it work the way they want.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781118725856
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 6/27/2013
  • Series: Wiley Software Patterns Series
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 512
  • File size: 9 MB

Meet the Author

Markus Völter works as an independent consultant on software technology and engineering based in Heidenheim, Germany. His primary focus is software architecture and patterns, middleware and model-driven software development. Markus has consulted and coached in many different domains, such as banking, health care, e-business, telematics, astronomy, and automotive embedded systems, in projects ranging from 5 to150 developers.

Markus is also a regular speaker at international conferences on software technology and object orientation. Among others, he has given talks and tutorials at ECOOP, OOPSLA, OOP, OT, JAOO and GPCE. Markus has published patterns at various PLoP conferences and writes articles for various magazines on topics that he finds interesting. He is also Co-author of the book Server Component Patterns, which is - just like the book you are currently reading - part of the Wiley series in Software Design Patterns.

When not dealing with software, Markus enjoys cross-country flying in the skies over southern Germany in his glider.

Markus can be reached at voelter@acm.org or via www.voelter.de

Michael Kircher is working currently as Senior software Engineer at Siemens AG Corporate Technology in Munich, Germany. His main fields of interest include distributed object computing, software architecture, patterns, agile methodologies, and management of knowledge workers in innovative environments. He has been involved in many projects as a consultant and developer within various Siemens business areas, building software for distributed systems. Among these were the development of software for UMTS base stations, toll systems, postal automation systems, and operation and maintenance software for industry and telecommunication systems.

In recent years Michael has published papers at numerous conferences on topics such as patterns, software architecture for distributed systems, and eXtreme Programming, and has organized several workshops at conferences such as OOPSLA and EuroPLoP. He is also co-author of the book Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture, Volume 3: Patterns for Resource Management.

In his spare time Michael likes to combine family life with enjoying nature, engaging in sports, or just watching wildlife.

Michael can be reached at michael@kircher-schwanninger.de or Via www.kircher-schwanninger.de

Uwe Zdun is working currently as an assistant professor in the Department of Information Systems at the Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration. He received his Doctoral degree from the University of Essen in 2002, where he worked from 1999 to 2002 as research assistant in the software specification group. His research interests include software patterns, scripting, object-orientation, software architecture, and Web engineering. Uwe has been involved as a consultant and developer in many software projects. He is author of a number of open-source software systems, including Extended Object Tcl (XOTcl), ActiWeb, Frag, and Leela, as well as many other open-source and industrial software systems.

In recent years he has published in numerous conferences and journals, and co-organized a number of workshops at conferences such as EuroPLoP, CHI, and OOPSLA.

He enjoys hiking, biking, pool, and guitar playing.

Uwe can be reached at zdun@acm.org or via wi.wu-wien.ac.at/~uzdun

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Table of Contents

Foreword.

Series Foreword.

Preface.

1. Introduction to Distributed Systems.

2. Pattern Language Overview.

3. Basic Remoting Patterns.

4. Identification Patterns.

5. Lifecycle Management Patterns.

6. Extension Patterns.

7. Extended Infrastructure Patterns.

8. Invocation Asynchrony Patterns.

9. Technology Projections.

10. .NET Remoting Technology Projection.

11. Web Services Technology Projection.

12. CORBA Technology Projection.

13.  Related Concepts, Technologies, and Patterns.

Appendix: Extending AOP Frameworks for Remoting.

References.

Index.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2005

    tough patterns

    Patterns are one of the key concepts to emerge in computing in the 90s. But if you read a typical book on patterns, the issue of remoting patterns often gets scant coverage. In many ways, as this particular book by Voelter et al makes clear, the problems can be far harder than for a software package running on one machine. At the most basic level, Remoting Errors (a pattern discussed early in the book) must always be a possibility as the communications channel between a client and a remote object can be subject to many failure modes. Then, later, there are issues of whether your object instances can be serialised into some kind of format able to be sent out over the network. You have to worry about marshalling and unmarshalling in the correct order. And the issues go on from there... C programmers of client-server applications may be familiar with many of the topics, if they used Remote Procedure Calls. So too might C++, Java and C# programmers. The book's topics recur, largely independent of the programming language chosen, because the issues are fundamental. The book gives a good coverage of .NET examples, and relatively little of J2EE. A bit more on the latter might have been good, perhaps. CORBA gets a brief discussion. Not because it has many prospects of future growth, I imagine. But probably because it still has a substantial market presence. Due to all those poor blighters in the 90s who had to code in this miserable framework. If, hopefully, you do not need to use CORBA, you should still read this chapter. It's a salutary explanation of a brittle and inferior pathway, as compared to using XML and Web Services for a distributed application.

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