Rent, Resources, Technologies

Overview

Rent, resources, and technologies are three crucial issues to the understanding of history and economics. The scarcity of resources, its interplay with technology, and the role of rent in explaining both economic growth and income distribution are investigated by adopting a multi-sectoral and non-proportional model, where scarce resources impose several scale constraints that may slow growth, but may contribute to further development of new technologies. In this dynamic framework the category of rent acquires new...

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Overview

Rent, resources, and technologies are three crucial issues to the understanding of history and economics. The scarcity of resources, its interplay with technology, and the role of rent in explaining both economic growth and income distribution are investigated by adopting a multi-sectoral and non-proportional model, where scarce resources impose several scale constraints that may slow growth, but may contribute to further development of new technologies. In this dynamic framework the category of rent acquires new dimensions with far-reaching implications for both the system of prices and the distribution of income. The analytical and formal-theoretical perspective of this book could be used as a basis for future historical and quantitative studies.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9783642085307
  • Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
  • Publication date: 12/7/2010
  • Edition description: Softcover reprint of hardcover 1st ed. 1999
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 260
  • Product dimensions: 0.57 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 6.14 (d)

Table of Contents

Historical and theoretical introduction to rent, resources and technologies.- Introduction.- Historical and empirical stylized facts.- Classical dynamics, scarcity, and surplus rent.- General static scarcity and marginal rent.- Dynamic and static scarcity, surplus and marginal rent: comparisons and developments.- Specific natural scarcities.- Growth without natural scarcities.- Complex development and relative scarcities.- Relative and absolute scarcities.- Scarce resources and structural rent in static conditions.- Resources, complex and dynamic scarcities, technological rent.- Conclusions and further lines of analysis.- Production and distribution: data, hypothesis and problems.- Introduction.- Basic products and primary commodities (PCC1).- Non-produced means of production (NPMP) and the processes directly using them.- Commodities and processes not directly using NPMP.- Technical coefficients and shares of necessary consumption.- Production techniques.- The viability of the techniques.- Scale constraints of the techniques and technological scarcity.- Production technologies.- Dimension of the economic system.- Some problems: new interdependence between production and distribution.- The order of efficiency (OE).- The levels of activity of the economic system.- The technology of the economic system.- The technology of the economic system.- The order of rentability.- Induced changes in the distribution of income.- Autonomous changes in the distribution of income.- Static analysis and dynamic analysis.- Conclusions.- Order of efficiency.- Introduction.- The general system price-distribution.- The sub-system prices-wage-profit.- The rent sub-system and types of rent.- The central role of NPMP.- Static price-distribution order of efficiency.- The order of efficiency with zero wage and maximum rate of profit.- The order of efficiency with zero profit maximum unit wage.- The order of efficiency with unit wage and rate of profit different from zero.- The order of physical efficiency.- Comparison among orders of efficiency.- Production with global technologies in static settings.- Introduction.- The physical system with one technique.- Global technologies and splitting coefficients.- The physical system with two techniques.- The physical economic system with k techniques.- Technology and the aggregate economic system.- Technology and the disaggregate economic system.- Changes in efficiency, in activity and efficiency proxies: some premises.- Changes in efficiency and price efficiency.- Growth of the production activity.- Conclusions and further lines of analysis.- Rent, distribution, prices.- Introduction.- The solving sub-system pwπ and the general system price-distribution.- Total distributive variables and value of the net product.- The order of rentability and its induced changes.- A simple case with one primary commodity and one final commodity.- Induced changes of wages and profits.- Autonomous changes in distribution: general propositions.- Autonomous changes with a stable solving sub-system and the effects on rents.- Autonomous changes with a stable solving sub-system and discontinous rent.- Autonomous changes with variable rents.- Autonomous changes in the solving sub-system with permanent rent.- Reduction in the technology dimension and effects on the distributive variables.- Conclusions.- Non-equiproportional dynamics with compound technologies: productions.- Introduction.- Towards dynamic systems: accumulation and residuals.- Introduction to compound technologies.- Equiproportional maximum growth with only one sub-system.- Non-equproportional growth with two techniques: compound technology and residuals.- The residuals and their possible utilization.- The total variables of the compound technology.- The rates of growth of productions.- The rates of growth of net products.- Comparisons between growth rates of productions and net products.- The rates of net product.- Equiproportional growth with two techniques.- Summary of the essential features.- The relation between technological change and technological dimension.- Choice of technologies and dynamic-physical order of efficiency.- Introduction.- Choice of techniques: previous hypotheses and their re-examination.- New efficiency orders, choice of techniques and of technologies.- Dynamic-physical OE among technologies relative to the same NPMP and the same time horizon.- Techniques with equal NPMP and s, and orderable residuals.- Techniques with equal NPMP and s, one of which without residuals.- Techniques with equal NPMP and s, and with non orderable residuals.- Techniques with equal NPMP and s, but with several commodities without residuals.- Techniques with equal NPMP and different s.- Dynamic efficiency: orderable and non-orderable cases.- Orderable and non-orderable cases: a numerical example.- Conclusions.- Choice of technologies and dynamic values efficiency order.- Introduction.- Discount rate and prices.- The dynamic values OE and the inter-temporal average rae of value added: a simplified case.- The determination of the inter-temporal average rate of value added: an example.- The impossibility of having a technology of tyxpe (A(1); A(2j); A(2i).- The dynamic OE among technologies composed of techniques with the same and different NPMP.- Conclusions.- Choice of technologies and dynamic price-distribution order of efficiency.- Introduction.- The dynamic price-distribution OE.- The dynamic price-distribution OE among techniques with the same NPMP.- The static and dynamic price-distribution OE.- Endowment of NPMP, growth time-horizon and consequences on the price-distribution OE.- Partial accumulation and its consequences on the dynamic price-distribution OE.- The relation between the dynamic values OE and the dynamic price-distribution OE.- Some final remarks.- The dynamics of income distribution: total wages and their shares.- Introduction.- Total distributive variables and net product value.- An overview on distribution and prices.- Wage dynamics.- Conclusions.- Dynamics of profits, rents and their shares.- Introduction.- Profit dynamics: general propositions.- The profit rate.- Total profits.- The share of profits on value added.- Rents dynamics.- The share of rents on value added with technology composed by one and two techniques.- Antagonism between the different distributive shares.- The dynamics of the share of rents with technology composed by three techniques.- Conclusions.- Technical progress and technological change.- Introduction.- First distinction between technical and technological progress.- Cases of technical progress.- Potential and actual, absolute and relative technical progress.- Relationships between technical and technological progress.- Natural and linear technical progress, and technological progress.- Structural technical progress with and without technological progress.- A proxy for assessing the interrelationship between technical and technological progress.- Technological progress without technical progress.- Conclusions.- Technical and technological progress, rent, and income distribution.- Introduction.- Technological progress and income distribution.- Types of technical progress and consequences on the price-distribution system.- Technical, technological progress and operators' behavior.- Profit rate and quasi-rent in the case of one active technique and structural technical progress.- Rent in the case of many active techniques and linear and structural technical progress in the process with NPMP.- Rent in the case of many active techniques and natural technical progress.- Technical progress in all processes of a technique.- Rent from technological scarcity and technological progress: a simplified case.- Rent from technological scarcity and technological progress: the general case.- Conclusions.- Conclusions and further lines of research.- Synthesis of results.- Ongoing extensions: numeraire, re-integration, and the environment.- The range and complexity of a "complete" theory of economic dynamics.

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