Reporting Vietnam: American Journalism 1959-1969 (Library of America)

Reporting Vietnam: American Journalism 1959-1969 (Library of America)

by Milton J. Bates
     
 

Vietnam was more than just the first television war; it was also the first war in which uncensored journalists reported widely and freely from the battlefield. The result was a powerful body of graphic and critical news reports that helped shaped public opinion back in the U.S. See more details below

Overview

Vietnam was more than just the first television war; it was also the first war in which uncensored journalists reported widely and freely from the battlefield. The result was a powerful body of graphic and critical news reports that helped shaped public opinion back in the U.S.

Editorial Reviews

Commentary
. . .American innocence . . .is a perhaps ineradicable trait of our national character, one that . . . affects the cynical no less than it does the truly innocent. . . .The truth about our wars. . .that they sometimes involve defending nasty regimes from being cushed by regimes far worse — may be more than a people that prides itself on its peaceableness and decency can bear.
John F. Stacks
To read Reporting Vietnam from the beginning to the war's end is to relive the war in all its agony, heroism and, finally, failure. . . . It is the combat reporting that is most moving, both for the horror seen and the risks taken. -- Time Magazine
Tom Engelhardt
Reading Reporting Vietnam is an addictive experience. . . .No body of journalism since has made such use of the vivid image. . . .There are also discoveries or rediscoveries to be made. . . .For all its bulk, this collection represents a kind of tunnel vision: the war as never-ending story, more and more of the same.
Nation
Library Journal - Library Journal
One of the few achievements of the long Vietnam conflict seems to have been its reporting, as distinct in its own way as the World War II stories of Ernie Pyle and A.J. Liebling. The Vietnam correspondents overcame the official "credibility gap" with a journalistic style that could be cool and defiantly factual, or personal, or sometimes exuberantly paranoid, echoing the soldiers themselves. The style develops as you read these two marvelous volumes: the early news accounts of advisers give way by mid-decade to a mission confusion and a growing respect for the underestimated Vietcong ("We used to call the enemy Victor Charlie. But now we call him Charles. Mr. Charles."). After the 1968 Tet Offensive, a more personal, sardonic voice emerges to match the bitter experience. In all, 80 writers survey the complex scene from all angles--from Don Moser's terrific anatomy of a 1968 guerrilla bombing to first-person accounts by POWs like John McCain, while Norman Mailer watches the street battles waged back home. Not everything here is literature, but the average is high. The collection concludes with Michael Herr's masterly, jungle-weary memoir, "Dispatches." Highly recommended for history, journalism, and literature collections.--Nathan Ward, "Library Journal"
Tom Engelhardt
Reading Reporting Vietnam is an addictive experience. . . .No body of journalism since has made such use of the vivid image. . . .There are also discoveries or rediscoveries to be made. . . .For all its bulk, this collection represents a kind of tunnel vision: the war as never-ending story, more and more of the same. -- The Nation

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781883011581
Publisher:
Library of America
Publication date:
10/28/1998
Series:
Library of America Series
Pages:
858
Sales rank:
1,024,552
Product dimensions:
5.26(w) x 8.10(h) x 1.17(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

Roger Rosenblatt
First-rate. . .as vivid a picture of the rich, tormented country as any novel has given us.
John LeCarre
This splendid collection testifies to the courage, endurance, and swallowed anger of an extraordinarily brave group of writers who, by sharing the agony, earned their right to report it.

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