The Republic and the Laws

The Republic and the Laws

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by Cicero
     
 

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Cicero's The Republic is an impassioned plea for responsible government written just before the civil war that ended the Roman Republic in a dialogue following Plato. This is the first complete English translation of both works for over sixty years and features a lucid introduction, a table of dates, notes on the Roman constitution, and an index of names.

Overview

Cicero's The Republic is an impassioned plea for responsible government written just before the civil war that ended the Roman Republic in a dialogue following Plato. This is the first complete English translation of both works for over sixty years and features a lucid introduction, a table of dates, notes on the Roman constitution, and an index of names.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780192832368
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
09/28/1998
Series:
Oxford World's Classics Series
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 5.00(h) x 0.70(d)
Lexile:
1320L (what's this?)

Meet the Author

Niall Rudd is Emeritus Professor of Latin at Bristol University. He has previously translated Juvenal's Satires for Oxford World's Classics. Jonathan Powell is Professor of Latin at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne. He is preparing a new text of De Republica and De Legibus for the Oxford Classical Texts series.

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Republic and the Laws 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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These two books are socratic dialogues by Cicero on two important topics; government, and laws. They are interesting but difficult reading, mainly due to the fact that they are both recovered from palimpsests -- the original parchment books were erased and written over by monks in the middle ages, because parchment was expensive and they didn't respect the Roman authors. In the process, much of both books was lost. This makes for big gaps in the discussions, making the reading difficult. I might suggest On Government as an alternative to On The Republic, although I haven't read it, since based on the page count I'm guessing that it's more complete.