The Republic in Print: Print Culture in the Age of U.S. Nation Building, 1770-1870

The Republic in Print: Print Culture in the Age of U.S. Nation Building, 1770-1870

by Trish Loughran
     
 

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In The Republic in Print, Trish Loughran challenges a dominant narrative about nationalism: the idea that print culture produces nations. Focusing on the years between 1770 and 1870, Loughran develops two richly detailed and provocative arguments. First she argues that it was the lack of national infrastructure (rather than a tightly connected print

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Overview

In The Republic in Print, Trish Loughran challenges a dominant narrative about nationalism: the idea that print culture produces nations. Focusing on the years between 1770 and 1870, Loughran develops two richly detailed and provocative arguments. First she argues that it was the lack of national infrastructure (rather than a tightly connected print network) that enabled the nation to be imagined between 1776 and 1790. She then describes how the increasingly connected book market of the 1830s, 1840s, and 1850s worked to exacerbate regional differences in ways that contributed to secession and civil war. Drawing on a range of literary, historical, and archival materials, The Republic in Print is a refreshing and original cultural history of the early American nation-state.

Editorial Reviews

The Journal of American History - Carl Ostrowski

Loughran's well-written book will likely promote vigorous debate among historians of U.S. nationhood, print culture, and slavery.

William and Mary Quarterly - Phillip H. Round

A remarkable study, both in its marshaling of archival detail and in its ambitious thesis.

American Historical Review - Oz Frankel

This book is inventively dialectical, unfailingly provocative, and consistently interesting. It formulates its myraid insights with an unusually rich, incisive and occasionally playful language that is deligtful to read.

American Journalism

Loughran's logic throughout is deep, intricate, and scholarly... Good reading.

The Journal of American History
Loughran's well-written book will likely promote vigorous debate among historians of U.S. nationhood, print culture, and slavery.

— Carl Ostrowski

William and Mary Quarterly
A remarkable study, both in its marshaling of archival detail and in its ambitious thesis.

— Phillip H. Round

College Literature

...Promise[s] to be useful to literary scholars in many ways.

American Historical Review
This book is inventively dialectical, unfailingly provocative, and consistently interesting. It formulates its myraid insights with an unusually rich, incisive and occasionally playful language that is deligtful to read.

— Oz Frankel

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780231511230
Publisher:
Columbia University Press
Publication date:
09/25/2007
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
568
File size:
9 MB

What People are saying about this

Jay Fliegelman

The Republic in Print delivers a knock-out punch to the supposedly determinate linkages between print culture and nation formation that underwrite much of the scholarship about early America in a number of fields. The book is a massive achievement, marvelously original, refreshingly polemical, compelling in its argument, and complex in its implications. Its importance will be immediately evident and its influence widespread.

David D. Hall

Asking us to rethink the meaning of nation and nation building in the aftermath of 1790, Trish Loughran has provided a series of remarkable case studies that support her skepticism about those subjects. An immensely valuable book.

Cindy Weinstein

A masterful reconceptualization of the role of print culture in the founding of the American nation. The claims of this book are ambitious and original, and Trish Loughran delivers. I can think of very few works of American studies that I have read in the past twenty years that are as intellectually satisfying, as archivally meticulous, and as broadly conceived as The Republic in Print.

Jonathan Arac

Trish Loughran possesses an unusually and admirably capacious intellectual character. This is a book that will have to be read by any serious student of the early republic and by any serious student of the crisis over slavery.

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