The Republic [NOOK Book]

Overview

The Republic was written by Plato around 380 BC concerning the definition of justice and the order and character of the just city-state and the just man. The dramatic date of the dialogue has been much debated and though it must take place some time during the Peloponnesian War, "there would be jarring anachronisms if any of the candidate specific dates between 432 and 404 were assigned". It is Plato’s best-known work and has proven to be one of the most intellectually and historically influential works of ...
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The Republic

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Overview

The Republic was written by Plato around 380 BC concerning the definition of justice and the order and character of the just city-state and the just man. The dramatic date of the dialogue has been much debated and though it must take place some time during the Peloponnesian War, "there would be jarring anachronisms if any of the candidate specific dates between 432 and 404 were assigned". It is Plato’s best-known work and has proven to be one of the most intellectually and historically influential works of philosophy and political theory. In it, Socrates along with various Athenians and foreigners discuss the meaning of justice and examine whether or not the just man is happier than the unjust man by considering a series of different cities coming into existence "in speech", culminating in a city ruled by philosopher-kings; and by examining the nature of existing regimes. The participants also discuss the theory of forms, the immortality of the soul, and the roles of the philosopher and of poetry in society.
The paradigm of the city — the idea of the Good, the Agathon — has manifold historical embodiments, undertaken by those who have seen the Agathon, and are ordered via the vision. The centre piece of the Republic, Part II, numbers 2–3, discusses the rule of the philosopher, and the vision of the Agathon with the allegory of the cave, which is clarified in the theory of forms. The centre piece is preceded and followed by the discussion of the means that will secure a well-ordered polis (City). Part II, no. 1, concerns marriage, the community of people and goods for the Guardians, and the restraints on warfare among the Hellenes. It describes a partially communistic polis. Part II, no. 4, deals with the philosophical education of the rulers who will preserve the order and character of the city-state.
In Part II, the Embodiment of the Idea, is preceded by the establishment of the economic and social orders of a polis (Part I), followed by an analysis (Part III) of the decline the order must traverse. The three parts compose the main body of the dialogues, with their discussions of the “paradigm”, its embodiment, its genesis, and its decline.
The Introduction and the Conclusion are the frame for the body of the Republic. The discussion of right order is occasioned by the questions: “Is Justice better than Injustice?” and “Will an Unjust man fare better than a Just man?” The introductory question is balanced by the concluding answer: “Justice is preferable to Injustice”. In turn, the foregoing are framed with the Prologue (Book I) and the Epilogue (Book X). The prologue is a short dialogue about the common public doxai (opinions) about “Justice”. Based upon faith, and not reason, the Epilogue describes the new arts and the immortality of the soul.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940013592155
  • Publisher: DB Publishing House
  • Publication date: 11/11/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 622
  • File size: 2 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 85 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(26)

4 Star

(18)

3 Star

(10)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(26)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 85 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2007

    a cornerstone of western philosophy

    do not be fooled! this book was (and still is) ages ahead of its time. there is no merely 'suspecting' that you understand this book. when you 'get it' you will 'know.' try to find an accurate translation and not one which is 'more culturally relevant today' - the idea that the Republic can be made 'culturally relevant' is all the more ridiculous considering that its implications are virtually eternal (and were meant to be). Socrates asks a lot of simple but very penetrating questions. a common and fatal error in contemporary Platonic scholarship (but even in the past) is the answering of each question (quickly) singly and missing the big picture. regardless of the historical existence of the philosophical Socrates or the historical occurence of the dialogues in the Republic, the account Plato has recorded for us in his book is among the most exact analyses of the human condition ever committed to paper. the vocabulary is not difficult, but some of the concepts will require close attention. it's better to read this book when you have some time to commit.

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2005

    A well written and thought provoking book

    In 'The Republic', Plato attempts to outline an ideal society based on justice. The governemnt he suggests, however, is merely the backdrop for answering vital questions about human nature. Plato tries to define justice as well as philosophers, and argues that the just man is happier tha the unjust man. I highly recommend this book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2013

    Find another version...

    No table of contents so navigation through the book is horrible.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2011

    Annoying format

    There is no proper table of contents so you have to manually page through tons of pages before arriving at the appropriate place.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2005

    Re-Public Rules!

    The whole idea, the vast concepts of a public before publicity existed, the interpretation of preparing a public to function in its 're' status, and allowing women to vote... this is a must read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2005

    THE OK BOOK

    I think the book it's ok, but i do suggest to read because it tells about all the governments and the one he thinks its the best. But I think the most important is that it makes you think and makes you analyzed about things about today and about your life its you opinion if u dont like it but i think you just didn't put too much attention or really dont like books at all.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2004

    Needful reading

    This book is both boring and tedious to read. However, Plato's Republic is essential for all historians and political scientists. In the Republic, Plato exlpains the effective use of the NOBLE LIE. The Republic is not a book to create a government from, but a book to explain government.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 6, 2014

    Lovely...! beautiful.....!.... Just enjoy it.....!

    Lovely...! beautiful.....!.... Just enjoy it.....!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 2, 2014

    Great Writing....!... Wonderful...! LOVE it...!

    Great Writing....!... Wonderful...! LOVE it...!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2013

    Blueripple

    Is dead. So this is no one's den. Feel free to take it as your own. It's even heated!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2013

    Useless

    Completely useless.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2013

    Text is gibberish after page 20

    Do not buy this ebook it is completely illegible. Choose a different edition of Plato's work.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2013

    No

    Dont get this

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2013

    WTH

    What is this? what everyone else said is true. This is is ridiculous, no table on contents, no seperation of the different books, there seems to be a lot of comentary between. This doens't make any sense

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2012

    Trash not the book at all

    Unreadable and not the republic 900 pages of trash

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2012

    Ok

    Ok

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2012

    Unreadable

    Characters where the should be letters.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2012

    Trash!!!!!!!!!!

    This just junk.. impossible to read. Dumbass..

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2012

    T

    T

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2012

    what is wrong with the typeset?

    free versions elsewhere are better

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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