Requisitioned: The British Country House in the Second World War

Requisitioned: The British Country House in the Second World War

5.0 1
by John Martin Robinson
     
 

This book profiles 20 country houses and their fate during WW2, from schools (Chatsworth) to hospitals to barracks (Eaton Hall) to storing the National Art Collection (Penrhyn Castle). Wide geographical spread, including Scotland (where the SOE trained in West Coast castles like Rosneath) and Wales. Some houses have since been restored to former glory, like Arundel

Overview

This book profiles 20 country houses and their fate during WW2, from schools (Chatsworth) to hospitals to barracks (Eaton Hall) to storing the National Art Collection (Penrhyn Castle). Wide geographical spread, including Scotland (where the SOE trained in West Coast castles like Rosneath) and Wales. Some houses have since been restored to former glory, like Arundel, some are famous only as a result of their wartime role - Bletchley Park - and others have been destroyed for ever.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781781310953
Publisher:
Aurum Press
Publication date:
05/06/2014
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 11.20(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

John Martin Robinson is a British architectural historian and officer of arms. Robinson is also a Knight of Magistral Grace of the Sovereign Military Order of Malta. He lives at Beckside House, Cumbria. Robinson is an active member of the Georgian Group.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Requisitioned: The British Country House in the Second World War 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
John Martin Robinson has written a fascinating chronicle of the fate of many great houses in England during World War II. The author has done extensive research on the role played by twenty houses, some famous, others obscure. Beginning in the late 1930s, the Ministry of Defense began requisitioning these stately homes and their grounds for a variety of purposes: military command, code-breaking center such as Bletchley Park, as seen on the recent PBS series "Bletchley Circle", as well as for barracks, hospitals, evacuated schools, HQ for MI5, and even a refuge for Queen Mary. I was struck by the contrast between the depiction of requisitioning as shown, on "Downton Abbey," in which part of the house was used as a hospital for injured soldiers in WWI, and the reality of the real cost to the owners of the estates both financially and physically, in that little money was paid for their use while often resulting in severe damage to the buildings and their furnishings. Here is a book for WWII history buffs and lovers of English country houses, filled with hundreds of archival photos, and an expertly written narrative between its 208 pages.