Rereading the Black Legend: The Discourses of Religious and Racial Difference in the Renaissance Empires

Hardcover (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$75.00
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $72.10
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 3%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (5) from $72.10   
  • New (3) from $72.10   
  • Used (2) from $113.74   

Overview


The phrase “The Black Legend” was coined in 1912 by a Spanish journalist in protest of the characterization of Spain by other Europeans as a backward country defined by ignorance, superstition, and religious fanaticism, whose history could never recover from the black mark of its violent conquest of the Americas. Challenging this stereotype, Rereading the Black Legend contextualizes Spain’s uniquely tarnished reputation by exposing the colonial efforts of other nations whose interests were served by propagating the “Black Legend.”

A distinguished group of contributors here examine early modern imperialisms including the Ottomans in Eastern Europe, the Portuguese in East India, and the cases of Mughal India and China, to historicize the charge of unique Spanish brutality in encounters with indigenous peoples during the Age of Exploration. The geographic reach and linguistic breadth of this ambitious collection will make it a valuable resource for any discussion of race, national identity, and religious belief in the European Renaissance.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

International History Review
The book is particularly strong on its superbly documented study of the appropriation of racial and religious categories in the New World. As such, this courageous and most worthy scholarly volume makes signal contributions to our understanding of the links between race, religion, and imperial projects within the painful transition into the early modern world.

— Teofilo F. Ruiz

Renaissance Quarterly
A welcome addition to the growing range of texts that critically explore the enduring legacies, desired and undesired, of a past that continues to shape our present.

— Shankar Ramen

Clio
[The editors] have put their talents to work in assembling a volume that will have a significant impact on early modern studies. This reader was humbled by the display of analytical prowess and the sheer volume of information on the interstices of race and religion in different settings throughout the early modern world. . . . An exceptional book that can and should be read by scholars and students of east and west, north and south, minority and dominant cultures.—Lisa Vollendorf, Clio

— Lisa Vollendorf

Dav�d Carrasco

“This book will be a major contribution to rereading not only the Black Legend but in navigating the very busy intersection of empire and racial and religious difference.  The authors deepen our understanding of how modern Western European practices of racialized discrimination developed in nuanced, nearly unimagined ways. Rereading the Black Legend, with its diverse essays, is about the formation of the world we live in today.”

William J. Kennedy

Rereading the Black Legend is a superbly organized collection that boldly traverses early modern imperialisms of Spain in the Americas, of the Ottomans in Eastern Europe, and of the Portuguese in East India and China. As a guide and critical reference work, it will be useful to undergraduate students and advanced scholars alike. I know of no comparable work currently available in academic publication, and I think it truly innovative in plan, scope, and approach.”

International History Review - Teofilo F. Ruiz

"The book is particularly strong on its superbly documented study of the appropriation of racial and religious categories in the New World. As such, this courageous and most worthy scholarly volume makes signal contributions to our understanding of the links between race, religion, and imperial projects within the painful transition into the early modern world."
Renaissance Quarterly - Shankar Ramen

"A welcome addition to the growing range of texts that critically explore the enduring legacies, desired and undesired, of a past that continues to shape our present."
Clio - Lisa Vollendorf

"[The editors] have put their talents to work in assembling a volume that will have a significant impact on early modern studies. This reader was humbled by the display of analytical prowess and the sheer volume of information on the interstices of race and religion in different settings throughout the early modern world. . . . An exceptional book that can and should be read by scholars and students of east and west, north and south, minority and dominant cultures."—Lisa Vollendorf, Clio
Davíd Carrasco

“This book will be a major contribution to rereading not only the Black Legend but in navigating the very busy intersection of empire and racial and religious difference.  The authors deepen our understanding of how modern Western European practices of racialized discrimination developed in nuanced, nearly unimagined ways. Rereading the Black Legend, with its diverse essays, is about the formation of the world we live in today.”
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780226307213
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication date: 12/15/2007
  • Pages: 448
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Margaret R. Greer is professor of Spanish and chair of the Department of Romance Studies at Duke University.

Walter D. Mignolo is the William H. Wannamaker Professor of Romance Studies and director of the Center for Global Studies and the Humanities at Duke University.

Maureen Quilligan is the Florence R. Brinkley Professor of English at Duke University.
 
 
 
 
 

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments      
 
1          Introduction     
Margaret R. Greer, Walter D. Mignolo, and Maureen Quilligan
 
 
Part I    Two Empires of the East
 
2          An Imperial Caste: Inverted Racialization in the Architecture of Ottoman Sovereignty    
Leslie Peirce
 
3          Hierarchies of Age and Gender in the Mughal Construction of Domesticity and Empire              
Ruby Lal
 
 
Part II              Spain: Conquista and Reconquista
 
4          Race and the Middle Ages: The Case of Spain and Its Jews                 
David Nirenberg
 
5          The Spanish Race        
Barbara Fuchs
 
6          The Black Legend and Global Conspiracies: Spain, the Inquisition, and the Emerging Modern World    
Irene Silverblatt

7          Of Books, Popes, and Huacas; or, The Dilemmas of Being Christian    
Gonzalo Lamana

8          The View of the Empire from the Altepetl: Nahua Historical and Global Imagination     
SilverMoon and Michael Ennis
 
9          “Race” and “Class” in the Spanish Colonies of America: A Dynamic Social Perception  
Yolanda Fabiola Orquera
 
10        Unfixing Race              
Kathryn Burns
 
 
Part III             Dutch Designs

11        Discipline and Love: Linschoten and the Estado da Índia         
Carmen Nocentelli-Truett 

12        Rereading Theodore de Bry’s Black Legend                
Patricia Gravatt
 
           
Part IV             Belated England
 
13        West of Eden: American Gold, Spanish Greed, and the Discourses of English Imperialism         
Edmund Valentine Campos
 
14        Blackening “the Turk” in Roger Ascham’s A Report of Germany (1553)         
Linda Bradley Salamon

15        Nations into Persons    
Jeffrey Knapp
 
 
Afterword: What Does the Black Legend Have to Do with Race?        
Walter D. Mignolo
 
Notes  
Bibliography   
List of Contributors   
Index

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)