Rescues!

Overview

Ten remarkable rescues from around the world.

In 1957, four stranded climbers faced certain death high in the Swiss Alps. Fifty of Europe's most experienced mountaineers quickly gathered to plan one of the riskiest rescues in climbing history. In 1977, a plane carrying 79 tourists was hijacked by Palestinian terrorists. After five tension-filled days, German commandos stormed the plane to rescue the passengers. In 1903, the deadliest rockslide in North American history buried ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $1.99   
  • Used (8) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$1.99
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(2228)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
1554510333 New Condition. Ships immediately.

Ships from: Lindenhurst, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$1.99
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(1603)

Condition: New
2006-09-12 Paperback New 1554510333 New Condition. Ships immediately.

Ships from: Lindenhurst, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Ten remarkable rescues from around the world.

In 1957, four stranded climbers faced certain death high in the Swiss Alps. Fifty of Europe's most experienced mountaineers quickly gathered to plan one of the riskiest rescues in climbing history. In 1977, a plane carrying 79 tourists was hijacked by Palestinian terrorists. After five tension-filled days, German commandos stormed the plane to rescue the passengers. In 1903, the deadliest rockslide in North American history buried much of the town of Frank, Alberta. Rescuers were forced to dig with their hands in a race against time to find survivors.

Jump into Rescues! and join desperate rescuers as they run through landslides, dangle over cliffs, and dive to the ocean floor. Witness real-life heroes as they brave flames, fly into uncharted territory, and defy gunmen to bring people back from the very edge of death.

The latest in the award-winning True Stories from the Edge series, the tension-filled and fast-paced stories in Rescues! are sure to leave readers breathless.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Firehouse Magazine [Melville NY]
Written for young readers, fourth grade and up, but so well done that adults will enjoy it too.... Part of what I really enjoyed about Rescues! Is that the stories are told as a whole, not just a compilation of excerpts from other books and magazine articles. This was a fast-paced and highly enjoyable read for young or old, or at least older readers.
Canadian Children's Book Centre Our Choice 2007
Ten heart-stopping true stories of desperate rescues from around the world which take readers from the top of a mountain to the depths of the sea.
Canadian Teacher
This collection of exciting accounts of ten real-life situations in which people risk their own lives to rescue others will appeal to readers who enjoy suspense and fastpaced short stories.
Our Choice 2007
Ten heart-stopping true stories of desperate rescues from around the world which take readers from the top of a mountain to the depths of the sea.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781554510337
  • Publisher: Annick Press, Limited
  • Publication date: 9/12/2006
  • Series: True Stories from the Edge Series
  • Pages: 136
  • Age range: 9 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Tanya Lloyd Kyi is the author of several books for young readers, including Truth, The Crystal Connection and My Time as Caz Hazard. She lives in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction: Putting Life on the Line

Death on the North Face
The Mountain that Walked
Operation Gwamba
Adrift on the Ice
Deadline for Death
Hope in the Storm
Undercover Hero
Five Dark Days
Entombed Underwater
Chaos under the Big Top

Selected Sources
Index
About the Author

Read More Show Less

Preface

Introduction: Putting Life on the Line

In October 1995, Hurricane Roxanne whipped the Gulf of Mexico into a chaos of four-story waves. Caught in the storm and blasted by winds howling at 140 kilometres (90 miles) per hour were 245 workers on board Derrick Lay Barge 269. And the barge was sinking.

Longer than a football field and used to lay underwater pipelines between oil rigs and the shores of Mexico, the massive barge was more than 20 years old. It had been battered by too many storms, and with its rusty seams and outdated equipment, was no longer capable of riding hurricane waters. Within a few hours after the storm struck, the equipment rooms were filling with water. When the force of the waves snapped the towlines between the barge and the two tugboats responsible for pulling it through the water, the barge was left without power and with little ability to float. It slowly settled deeper and deeper into the ocean until the waves crashed over every surface of the deck.

One by one, most of the 245 workers jumped from the barge into the sea, to be picked up by the waves and slammed underwater. It was like being lifted to the top of a cliff, then dropped to the bottom, again and again. Many of the inflatable life rafts were picked up like cardboard and blown away by the wind.

Mexico has no coast guard, and boats from the navy and the U.S. Coast Guard were too far away to help. The workers' only hope lay in the captains of the two tugboats who had been pulling the barge, and the crew of one other tugboat that happened to be in the area.

It was growing dark. Pitching onto the crests of waves, then hurtling into the troughs, the three tugboats struggled to get near the floating workers without crushing them under the bows of their boats. On board the Captain John, the smallest of the rescue boats, the crew tried roping themselves together for safety before they threw rescue lines to the survivors bobbing in the waves. By the time they had pulled a few men on board, their rescue lines were hopelessly tangled. They were forced to cut them off. After that, whenever a wave crashed across the boat, one man would yell and all crew members would drop to the deck, frantically grabbing any piece of equipment that would keep them from being swept into the sea. It became a rhythm: throw a rescue line, haul a survivor on board, drop as a wave tried to crush the boat, wait for the water to drain away, and toss another rescue line. One of the crew members was caught by a wave, battered against the deckhouse, then crushed against the bulwarks. Just as he was being swept over the edge of the stern, he managed to grab a pipe and stop his fall.

On the Ducker Tide, the supply tug that had responded to the barge's rescue signals, First Mate Hayman Webster scanned the water for the blinking emergency lights attached to each worker's life preserver. Hayman was a massive man and a second-generation sailor. As the captain brought the side of the boat crashing down toward swimming workers, Hayman would lean over the side, grab a life preserver in one enormous fist, and single-handedly heave a man onto the deck of his boat. He pulled dozens to safety before some of the rescued workers organized ropes and began hauling their fellow survivors on board.

On board the third tugboat, the North Carolina, the crew huddled on the most sheltered sections of the deck, terrified of being swept off the rolling, lunging vessel. But First Mate Eulalio Zapata Martinez put the lives of the barge workers above his own safety. Seeing that other crew members were too frightened to help, Eulalio tied himself to a winch on deck and began leaning far over the side to haul survivors on board one by one.

Working alone, he was in constant danger of being swept overboard. The first time it happened, he dangled in midair, held by his safety line, until he could haul himself back. The second time, he caught hold of a cargo net and climbed to the deck. The third time, a wave slammed him into the hull, then buried him in water. Every time he tried to pull himself up, another swell crushed him. Finally, a wave spun him in the right direction and he grabbed the rails for long enough to save himself. And, eventually, a few of the rescued crew recovered enough to replace Eulalio at his work.

Throughout the evening, on all three boats, men labored to find and rescue the workers. By the time help reached them, some swimmers were too exhausted to hold onto a safety line. Others were covered with slippery oil and almost impossible to grab. Still others were injured or unconscious. For more than six hours, as the captains struggled to maneuver their tugs in impossible seas,
the rescuers worked unceasingly. When the barge's crew could finally be gathered and tallied the following morning, all but 23 had been rescued. Fifteen more were found two days later, alive and tied to a part of the barge's crane equipment that had miraculously stayed above water. Only eight men were lost.

Before the Days of 911

Some rescue teams, like the tugboat crews of Hurricane Roxanne, are born amidst the chaos of a dangerous situation. People see a sudden need and band together to offer help. But throughout history, people have also worked to form more stable and permanent rescue and lifesaving groups.

As early as 24 B.C., the city of Rome founded a brigade of paid and trained firefighters to protect its citizens. In 1049, a group of monks built a hospice for travelers high in the Alps between Switzerland and Italy, and began to find and care for those who strayed from the dangerous mountain paths. In fact, it was these monks who bred and trained the first St. Bernard rescue dogs in the 1600s.

In North America, the first coastal rescue organization was founded in Massachusetts in the 1700s, intended to help sailors who were caught by the area's unpredictable weather or shipwrecked on the treacherous offshore sandbars. In the early 1800s, the government ordered navy boats to patrol the coast during the annual storm season and rescue vessels in trouble—a precursor to today's coast guards.

The innovations of the 19th century brought the need for new kinds of lifesaving. An increase in swimming pools and swimming competitions had led to more drowning deaths, and in 1892 British swimming champion William Henry helped to form a society that taught rescue and first aid skills to expert swimmers—the first lifeguards. The same society now has branches in 50 countries.

There's also a third type of rescue team—not as official as a coast guard, yet not as spontaneous as the Hurricane Roxanne crews. Sometimes people have cooperated with their friends or neighbors to act against injustices in the world around them. For example, in the late 1700s and early 1800s, farmers, business owners, and other citizens of the United States and Canada formed the Underground Railroad to help lead escaped slaves to freedom. Each operator on the "railroad" knew of a few other operators or safe houses nearby, but didn't know the details of the full operation. That way, one captured operator couldn't destroy the entire route.

The Underground Railroad is only one story of ordinary people who saw a problem and unofficially banded together to solve it. A century later, other groups formed to help Jews flee persecution and death during World War II. And in France, an entire town took action.

Le Chambon-sur-Lignon

In the late
1930s, high in the mountains of southern France, Pastor Daniel Trocmé was enjoying the warmth of his home as the winter weather swirled around the village of Le Chambonsur-Lignon. Suddenly, he heard a knock at the door. Pastor Trocmé wasn't expecting anyone, but it wasn't uncommon for a parishioner to arrive late at night seeking care or advice.

He opened the door—and found not a parishioner, but a woman he'd never seen before. She was shivering in the cold. She was a Jew, she said. Could she come in?

Pastor Troc

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)