Rescuing the Children: The Story of the Kindertransport

Rescuing the Children: The Story of the Kindertransport

by Deborah Hodge
     
 

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This important book tells the story of how ten thousand Jewish children were rescued out of Nazi Europe just before the outbreak of World War 2. They were saved by the Kindertransport — a rescue mission that transported the children (or Kinder) from Nazi-ruled countries to safety in Britain.

The book includes real-life accounts of the children and is

Overview

This important book tells the story of how ten thousand Jewish children were rescued out of Nazi Europe just before the outbreak of World War 2. They were saved by the Kindertransport — a rescue mission that transported the children (or Kinder) from Nazi-ruled countries to safety in Britain.

The book includes real-life accounts of the children and is illustrated with archival photographs, paintings of pre-war Nazi Germany by artist, Hans Jackson, and original art by the Kinder commemorating their rescue.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“…Neither melodramatic nor sentimental, the simple, accessible prose reveals the historical realities of how ‘non-Jewish children [were] taught to love Hitler and to hate Jews,’ along with the heartbreak of saying good-bye and the fact that most of the rescued would never see their parents again…. Even with all the books out there about the Kindertransport, readers will grab this exemplary title for historical research and for personal reading.”
— Starred Review, Booklist

“Fitting neatly into primary-classroom units about World War II and the Holocaust…. Then-and-now portraits … with a mix of period photos and paintings by Kinder artist Hans Jackson, provide plenty of visual witness to those dangerous times and the children caught in them. A quick but systematic overview, well-endowed with both visual and documentary supporting material….”
—Kirkus Reviews

“Heartbreaking and hopeful at the same time…. Explaining the Holocaust is never easy, but Hodge does an outstanding job of describing the horrors of what was happening and then putting them in a historical context that is comprehensible to even young students with only a passing knowledge of the period…. “
—School Library Journal

“…Deborah Hodge pieces together some of the remarkable tales told by the children who lived because they escaped from the Nazis. What is most striking about Hodge’s book is how she weaves what the children themselves relate into her narrative. In their own words, they offer readers insight into the trauma of leaving their families and friends behind, journeying to a place where they didn’t speak the language and felt foreign and alone, unsure what was happening back home or whether they’d ever see their parents or siblings again.”
Canadian Children’s Book News

Children's Literature - Greg M. Romaneck
In the Talmud it is written that, "He who saves a single life, saves the world entire." In 1938-39 dozens of people worked to rescue Jewish children suffering under the increasing oppression of the Nazi regime in Germany. These children were separated from their parents and taken to Great Britain in an effort to save them from a fate that could hardly be imagined even by the people laboring on behalf of the refugees. In the end, over 10,000 Jewish children were taken out of Germany by train and boat in what came to be called the Kindertransports. In many cases these refugee children never saw their parents again as all too many of them disappeared in the horrible destruction of the Holocaust. Living in a foreign land, with new customs and language, the refugees struggled but ultimately flourished. In Rescuing the Children Hodge presents this remarkable rescue through the perspectives of eight youngsters who directly experienced these events. Combining a thoughtful, and often moving narrative, with the actual words of Kindertransport participants, this book becomes a manifesto on the dueling factors of cruelty and compassionate resilience. In the end the 10,000 Jewish children who escaped destruction via the Kindertransport not only lived but also became the source of rich contributions and family life. Readers of this fine book will not only learn the story of these Jewish refugee children but will also discover something about the human spirit and the need for empathy for our fellow beings. Reviewer: Greg M. Romaneck
VOYA - Amy Wyckoff
Almost ten thousand children travelled from Germany, Czechoslovakia, Austria, and Poland to the safety of England between December 1938 and September 1939, right before the start of WWII. This book brings the story of the Kindertransport alive for elementary and middle school students. Readers meet eight children who were passengers on the Kindertransport and get to know them through anecdotes in their own words and photos of them as children. The author emphasizes that what makes this story remarkable is not only how brave the children were as they travelled away from their families and homes, but also how brave their parents were to send them away and how brave the organizers of the Kindertransports were as they risked their own lives to save the children. During a time of great sadness, these individuals had hope for a better future. Rescuing The Children tells an extraordinary story with the addition of primary source material, which could be used in the classroom to enhance understanding of what children experienced as passengers on the Kindertransport. This book is enhanced by the inclusion of up-to-date information on the children featured, maps, a timeline, a list of related books, and an index. Reviewer: Amy Wyckoff
School Library Journal
Gr 4–8—Heartbreaking and hopeful at the same time, Hodge's account tells of the flight of Jewish children from Germany and a few other countries at the outset of World War II. Unsure of the future, and terrified of their present, thousands of Jewish families made the unthinkable decision to send their children to Britain in an effort to save them from the atrocities that seemed to be looming in Hitler's Germany. Explaining the Holocaust is never easy, but Hodge does an outstanding job of describing the horrors of what was happening and then putting them in a historical context that is comprehensible to even young students with only a passing knowledge of the period. Complementing these explanations are the recollections of a few survivors who discuss the trips to Britain, the initial fright at being in a foreign land with no family and a language barrier, and their lives after the war. Photographs and artwork from some of the survivors are used effectively to enhance the presentation and add a sense of time and place. Excellent back matter includes a time line of events, useful books and websites for both children and adults, and a note to teachers and parents about discussing the Holocaust with children.Jody Kopple, Shady Hill School, Cambridge, MA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781770492561
Publisher:
Tundra
Publication date:
10/09/2012
Pages:
64
Sales rank:
1,127,510
Product dimensions:
7.38(w) x 9.14(h) x 0.47(d)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
“…Neither melodramatic nor sentimental, the simple, accessible prose reveals the historical realities of how ‘non-Jewish children [were] taught to love Hitler and to hate Jews,’ along with the heartbreak of saying good-bye and the fact that most of the rescued would never see their parents again…. Even with all the books out there about the Kindertransport, readers will grab this exemplary title for historical research and for personal reading.”
— Starred Review, Booklist

“Fitting neatly into primary-classroom units about World War II and the Holocaust…. Then-and-now portraits … with a mix of period photos and paintings by Kinder artist Hans Jackson, provide plenty of visual witness to those dangerous times and the children caught in them. A quick but systematic overview, well-endowed with both visual and documentary supporting material….”
—Kirkus Reviews

“Heartbreaking and hopeful at the same time…. Explaining the Holocaust is never easy, but Hodge does an outstanding job of describing the horrors of what was happening and then putting them in a historical context that is comprehensible to even young students with only a passing knowledge of the period…. “
—School Library Journal

Meet the Author

Deborah Hodge has written more than 25 books for children. Many of her books have won awards and been published internationally. Her picture book, Lily and the Mixed-up Letters, was chosen by IBBY as an Outstanding Book for Young People with Disabilities. She also won the Information Book Award from the Children’s Literature Roundtable of Canada.

Deborah specializes in writing engaging nonfiction for young readers and loves the challenge of using few words to explain big thoughts. Deborah is a former teacher and curriculum writer for the BC Ministry of Education. She lives in Vancouver, Canada.

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