Research: The Student's Guide to Writing Research Papers / Edition 3

Research: The Student's Guide to Writing Research Papers / Edition 3

by Richard Veit
     
 

ISBN-10: 0205318827

ISBN-13: 9780205318827

Pub. Date: 10/12/2000

Publisher: Pearson Education

Today's researchers are often overwhelmed with the thought of writing a "proper" research paper. Style, format, and proper documentation conventions are a continuous concern for the writer. This book will help put a writer's mind at ease. Unlike most comparable books, this one leads with sample research papers, giving the readers a clear understanding of the final

Overview

Today's researchers are often overwhelmed with the thought of writing a "proper" research paper. Style, format, and proper documentation conventions are a continuous concern for the writer. This book will help put a writer's mind at ease. Unlike most comparable books, this one leads with sample research papers, giving the readers a clear understanding of the final goal as they progress through the process. The entire research and writing processes are covered step-by-step, from initial invention to final copyediting. New material includes sample MLA-style papers, a revision of the library chapter, and more. Writers-experienced and emerging.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780205318827
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
10/12/2000
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
7.52(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.20(d)

Table of Contents

To the Instructor ix
Introduction: What Is Research?
1(6)
Doing Research
1(1)
The Research Paper
2(1)
Primary and Secondary Research
3(1)
Benefits of Doing Research
4(3)
Learning an Essential Skill
4(1)
Contributing to Scholarship
5(1)
Gaining Personal Knowledge
5(2)
Two Sample Research Papers
7(30)
The Research Process
7(1)
A Research Assignment
7(3)
The Finished Product
10(27)
A Sample Standard Research Paper
10(10)
A Sample Personal Research Paper
20(17)
Selecting a Research Topic
37(12)
Your Research Schedule: Planning in Advance
37(1)
The Benefits of Word Processing
37(1)
A Research Notebook
38(1)
Your Research Topic
39(2)
Generating Ideas
41(8)
Brainstorming
41(4)
Developing an Idea: Clustering
45(4)
Tools for Finding Sources
49(24)
Beginning Your Research
49(1)
Your Campus Library
50(1)
Electronic Resources
50(2)
Networks
51(1)
Using Your Library's Research Tools
52(6)
Finding Books and Other Library Holdings
53(4)
Encyclopedias and Other General Reference Works
57(1)
Finding Articles: Magazines, Journals, and Newspapers
58(1)
Locating Periodicals
58(1)
Microforms
59(1)
Library Vandalism---A Crime against Scholarship
59(1)
Using Electronic Databases
59(10)
A Sample Search for Periodical Sources
60(7)
Finding Government Documents
67(2)
Internet Resources
69(2)
Web Search Engines
69(2)
The Reference Librarian---The Most Resourceful Resource
71(2)
Finding Sources Outside the Library: Conducting Interviews and Writing Letters
73(8)
Interviewing Sources
73(4)
Arranging the Interview
74(1)
Conducting the Interview
75(2)
Writing for Information
77(1)
Still Other Sources
78(3)
Assembling a Prospectus and a Working Bibliography
81(26)
A Research Prospectus
81(4)
The Working Bibliography
85(1)
Bibliographic Formats
86(1)
General Guidelines---MLA Format
86(3)
Citing Electronic Sources
88(1)
Model Entries---MLA Format
89(18)
Sources in Books
89(6)
Sources in Periodicals and Newspapers
95(6)
Other Sources
101(6)
Putting Your Sources To Work: Reading and Taking Notes
107(16)
Using Your Written Sources
107(12)
Reading Your Sources
108(2)
Evaluating Your Sources
110(1)
Narrowing Your Paper's Focus
111(2)
Formulating and Refining a Plan
113(1)
Taking Notes on Note Cards
114(5)
Avoiding Plagiarism
119(4)
Reporting on Sources: Paraphrase and Quotation
123(28)
The Conventions of Reporting
124(1)
Options for Presenting Sources
124(2)
Acknowledging Sources
126(2)
Relying on Experts
128(1)
Paraphrasing Sources
129(2)
Quoting Sources
131(12)
Punctuating Quotations
131(7)
Altering Quotations
138(5)
When to Quote and When to Paraphrase
143(5)
A Further Note on Plagiarism
148(3)
Using Parenthetical Notes
151(16)
Types of Notes
151(2)
Parenthetical Notes
153(12)
Some Special Cases
154(6)
When Are Notes Needed?
160(2)
How Many Notes Are enough?
162(2)
How Much Material Can One Note Cover?
164(1)
Information Footnotes
165(2)
Writing and Revising the Research Paper
167(36)
Getting Organized
167(4)
Formulating a Thesis Statement
167(2)
Sorting Your Note Cards
169(2)
Updating Your Outline
171(1)
Writing the First Good Draft
171(9)
Research Writing: General Guidelines
171(3)
Some Practical Writing Tips
174(1)
Getting Started
175(1)
Writing the Opening
176(3)
Writing the Conclusion
179(1)
Giving Your Paper a Title
180(1)
Editing and Revising
180(23)
Reworking Your Paper
181(1)
Checklist for Editing and Revising
181(3)
Getting Advice from Other Readers
184(19)
Producing and Proofreading Your Polished Draft
203(44)
Format for Your Polished Draft
203(12)
Format for Computer-printed or Typed Papers
204(9)
Format for Handwritten Papers
213(2)
A Formal Outline
215(7)
Standard Numbering System
218(1)
Decimal System
219(2)
Topic and Sentence Outlines
221(1)
And, Finally, Proofreading the Finished Product
222(1)
APPENDIXES
A: Other Citation Formats: APA Style and Numbered References
223(12)
B: Footnotes and Endnotes
235(12)
Index 247

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