Reservation Blues

Reservation Blues

by Eddy Clearwater
     
 

Though Eddy Clearwater performs in a colorful, Native American-inspired headdress to celebrate his Cherokee grandmother's heritage, it is his African-American blues roots that rule when he picks up his guitar and starts to sing. One of the young players on the West Side Chicago scene of the 1950s, Clearwater recalls a plethora of players from that era on his latest… See more details below

Overview

Though Eddy Clearwater performs in a colorful, Native American-inspired headdress to celebrate his Cherokee grandmother's heritage, it is his African-American blues roots that rule when he picks up his guitar and starts to sing. One of the young players on the West Side Chicago scene of the 1950s, Clearwater recalls a plethora of players from that era on his latest release: The dark and moody "Running Along" evokes Otis Rush, "I Wouldn't Lay My Guitar Down" is right out of the Chuck Berry school, and "Find Yourself" recalls Muddy Waters. But Clearwater doesn't just pay tribute, he elevates the roots into energized branches, ensuring their health by contemporizing the blues with his pen. Clearwater's "Walls of Hate" tears into racism with global imagery, while the title cut, with its T-Bone Walker-Texas feel, is a low-down poem that compares the blues man's lot to that of a Native American confined to a marginal life on the reservation. But the set is not all bleak, and the instrumental "Blues Cruise," which features Duke Robillard (who produced the CD and plays rhythm guitar throughout) trading solos with Clearwater, sails along like a lazy day on the Mississippi River. And on "Everything to Gain," Clearwater does what only an artist who has been kicking around clubs for 50 years could do, turns loss into a wide-open lane of opportunity on the blues highway.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Scott Yanow
Eddy Clearwater is equally talented as a bluish singer and as an improvising guitarist. On Reservation Blues, he ranges from Chicago blues to rock & roll, throwing in a couple instrumentals too. His repertoire includes both socially relevant lyrics and good-time music, featuring some of the latter when the former gets a bit too somber. Although there are some solid solos from his supporting players (including three guitar spots for Duke Robillard, two fine solos from tenor saxophonist Dennis Taylor, and a guest appearance by Carey Bell on harmonica during "Find Yourself"), Clearwater is the main star throughout. Fortunately, he is heard in prime form, whether happily jamming "I Wouldn't Lay My Guitar Down" and "Blues Cruise" or singing in a more serious mood on "Winds of Change" and "Everything to Gain." A gem.
Southwest Blues
A treasure of a recording made by a veteran blues artist who is not content to simply recycle the same tunes over and over. While Eddy Clearwater is a bluesman in the classic electric tradition, he continues to let his music evolve by mixing new ideas and songs, while not straying too far from the blues roots that he established on Chicago's West Side.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/12/2000
Label:
Bullseye Blues
UPC:
0011661963627
catalogNumber:
619636
Rank:
123358

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Eddy Clearwater   Primary Artist,Guitar,Vocals
Duke Robillard   Guitar,Rhythm Guitar,Soloist
Carey Bell   Harmonica
Doug James   Baritone Saxophone
Matt McCabe   Piano,Soloist
Dennis Taylor   Tenor Saxophone,Soloist
Jeff McAllister   Percussion,Drums
John Packer   Bass

Technical Credits

Eddy Clearwater   Producer
Duke Robillard   Producer
Dale Hawkins   Composer
John Paul Gauthier   Engineer
Stan Lewis   Composer
Michael McCall   Liner Notes
Tom Walsh   Mastering
Eleanor Broadwater   Composer
Elly Broadwater   Composer
Eddy Harrington   Composer

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