Resistance, Parody, And Double Consciousness In African American Theatre, 1895-1910

Resistance, Parody, And Double Consciousness In African American Theatre, 1895-1910

by David Krasner
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Offers insights into African American artistry during an era of racism and conflict.
See more details below

Overview

Offers insights into African American artistry during an era of racism and conflict.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Krasner's combination of extensive archival research and far-ranging knowledge provides an exhilarating intellectual experience.” —Library Jourbanal

“The first winner of the Errol Hill Award for notable studies of African American theater, Krasner's insightful book examines a slighted period in the history of theater and entertainment.” —Choice

Booknews
Within the racial tensions and constraints of the late 19th and early 20th centuries in the US, black performers channeled resistance to stereotypes of blacks as inferior via both parody (countering white blackfaced images of minstrels) and maintaining what W.E.B. Du Bois termed "double consciousness." Krasner (undergraduate theatre studies, Yale U.) analyzes the strategies (e.g. cakewalking, trickster folk characters, and insistence on non-segregated seating) to foster solidarity and undermine racism that were enacted on the stages of diverse major black productions of that era<-->for their historical, social, and political implications for African American identity. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312173630
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan
Publication date:
09/01/1997
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
226
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.68(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >