Resistible Rise of Market Fundamentalism: Rethinking Development Policy in an Unbalanced World

Overview

In this empirically grounded analysis of the world economy during the past 20 years, two eminent economists focus on trade, financial flows and foreign direct investment. They find that the economic forces presumed to be crucial for spreading the benefits of globalization have been less than global, much weaker than predicted, and carry potentially damaging effects as well as benefits. Future negotiation depends not on whether the globalization agenda should be extended to new issues, but whether trust in the ...

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Overview

In this empirically grounded analysis of the world economy during the past 20 years, two eminent economists focus on trade, financial flows and foreign direct investment. They find that the economic forces presumed to be crucial for spreading the benefits of globalization have been less than global, much weaker than predicted, and carry potentially damaging effects as well as benefits. Future negotiation depends not on whether the globalization agenda should be extended to new issues, but whether trust in the existing rules can be restored by applying them more fairly

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781842776377
  • Publisher: Zed Books
  • Publication date: 2/19/2008
  • Pages: 176
  • Product dimensions: 5.56 (w) x 8.58 (h) x 0.86 (d)

Meet the Author

Richard Kozul-Wright is Senior Economic Affairs Officer, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). Paul Rayment is Director of Economic Analysis at the Commission for Europe of the United Nations.

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Table of Contents

Introduction
• Globalisation as it was in the beginning, is now, and ....
• Trade flows and global interdependence
• Financial flows and global interdependence
• Foreign Direct Investment and integrated international production
• Twenty years on: The record of neo-liberalism since the debt crisis
• What is to be Done? A realistic framework for development policies

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 8, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Fine attack on capitalist theory

    Richard Kozul-Wright, an economist at the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, and Paul Rayment, an economist at the UN¿s Economic Commission for Europe, have written a useful book opposing what they call the `neo-liberal idolisation of market forces¿.<BR/><BR/>Chapter 1 defines market fundamentalism; chapter 2 looks at globalisation in historical perspective, chapter 3 at trade and financial flows, and chapter 4 at corporations. Chapter 5 revisits globalisation, chapter 6 studies national development strategies, chapter 7 criticises market fundamentalism and chapter 8 examines the conditions for a sustainable global order. <BR/><BR/>The 1980s liberalisers promised that liberalising capital, finance and trade would bring more growth, investment, industry, equality and stability. But instead it brought less of all these. <BR/><BR/>95 out of the 124 developing countries grew faster in the period 1960-78 than in 1978-98. Yet the capitalist states of the developed world forced the developing countries to pay out more than $700 billion net between 1997 and 2002. <BR/><BR/>This exploitation and bullying continues today. As the authors note, the EU¿s trade agreements with developing countries `often contain even more stringent demands than those made by the WTO [World Trade Organisation]¿. And again, just as in the 1920s, the capitalist states¿ imposition of welfare cuts, labour market flexibility and monetarism have led to a crash.<BR/><BR/>The Labour Party has embraced market fundamentalism, and represents only the City of London, whose interests are opposed to the interests of the majority here in Britain and to the interests of the developing countries. <BR/><BR/>To defeat the slump, every country, Britain included, needs the pro-industry policies that enabled the developed nations to develop their economies originally. Every country needs to produce goods to meet domestic demand, not a `lop-sided reliance on external demand as the basis of sustained growth¿. <BR/><BR/>Especially, every country needs to control capital flows. This is necessary to development and also to democracy As the authors write, ¿In a democracy, these restraints [on property rights] reflect the legitimate preferences of the population, and for an international institution or a developed country to insist that they be altered to reflect another set of preferences is a gross interference in the democratic process.¿

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