Resolution (Virgil Cole/Everett Hitch Series #2)

( 62 )

Overview

"After the bloody confrontation in Appaloosa, Everett Hitch heads into the afternoon sun and ends up in Resolution, an Old West town so new the dust has yet to settle. It's the kind of town that doesn't have much in the way of commerce, except for a handful of saloons and some houses of ill repute. Hitch takes a job as lookout at Amos Wolfson's Blackfoot Saloon and quickly establishes his position as protector of the ladies who work the backrooms - as well as a man unafraid to stand up to the enforcer sent down from the O'Malley copper mine."
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Overview

"After the bloody confrontation in Appaloosa, Everett Hitch heads into the afternoon sun and ends up in Resolution, an Old West town so new the dust has yet to settle. It's the kind of town that doesn't have much in the way of commerce, except for a handful of saloons and some houses of ill repute. Hitch takes a job as lookout at Amos Wolfson's Blackfoot Saloon and quickly establishes his position as protector of the ladies who work the backrooms - as well as a man unafraid to stand up to the enforcer sent down from the O'Malley copper mine." Though Hitch makes short work of hired gun Koy Wickman, tensions continue to mount, so that even the self-assured Hitch is relieved by the arrival in town of his friend Virgil Cole. When greedy mine owner Eamon O'Malley threatens the loose coalition of local ranchers and starts buying up Resolution's few businesses, Hitch and Cole find themselves in the middle of a makeshift war between O'Malley's men and the ranchers. In a place where law and order don't exist, Hitch and Cole must make their own, guided by their sense of duty, honor, and friendship.
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Editorial Reviews

Boston Globe
Robert B. Parker is a force of nature.
Publishers Weekly

Parker applies his customary vigor to this sequel to Appaloosa(2005), in a sparse, bullet-riddled rumination on law and order, friendship and honor. Narrator and hired gun Everitt Hitch takes a job as lookout in Amos Wolfson's Blackfoot Saloon and, in short order, guns down local upstart Koy Wickman and stands up for the town's beleaguered prostitutes. Without fully intending it, he creates a haven of orderliness amid the chaos of sheriff-less Resolution. But larger forces are at work as Eamon O'Malley, competing with Wolfson for control of Resolution, hires freelance thugs Cato and Rose to replace Wickman. Lest Everitt end up outnumbered, his old friend Virgil Cole turns up just as Wolfson and O'Malley amass armies for a decisive battle. Wolfson's army turns out to be the more unsavory and dishonorable, winning the day against O'Malley-but Virgil, Everitt, Cato and Rose are prepared to settle things the honorable way. Though the plot meanders its way to a too-fast climax, Parker's dialogue is snappy and his not-a-word-wasted scenes suit this Spartan western. (June)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

Parker's writing is a pure pleasure to read-terse and strong, it carries a good story and lays its messages between the lines. His latest Western picks up where Appaloosa left off with Everett Hitch and Virgil Cole together again working as hired guns for a nasty SOB named Wolfson. Wolfson wants to own the whole town of Resolution, but Eamon O'Malley, the local mine owner, stands in his way-Eamon with his gunslingers Cato and Rose. Wolfson is also squeezing the local farmers and small ranchers out of business. A range war is inevitable, and Cole and Hitch wind up champions of the little guys. This is more of a shoot-'em-up than Appaloosa was-plenty of action, not too much character development, fast and fun to read. Could this be the beginning of a new series? The film version of Appaloosa starring Ed Harris, Viggo Mortensen, and Renee Zellweger is set to be released later this year. Highly recommended for all Western collections.
—Ken St. Andre

Kirkus Reviews
Everett Hitch and Virgil Cole ride (separately) into the western town of Resolution and deal with the trouble that instantly springs up to greet them. Amos Wolfson, who owns the Blackfoot Saloon, has already lost several bouncers, one to a smartly placed bullet, when he offers the job to Everett Hitch. Hitch's approach to the position doesn't sound very ambitious. He sits night after night in the saloon with a shotgun, waiting to see what develops, and passing the time by adopting such a protective attitude toward local members of the oldest profession that Wolfson sneeringly calls him "Fucking Saint Everett of the Whores." For all of Hitch's sentimentality, his tactics are highly effective against Koy Wickman, the weaselly provocateur who works for copper-mine owner Eamon O'Malley. In no time at all Wickman's been retired, buried and replaced by the fearsome twosome of Cato Tillson and Frank Rose. When Virgil Cole arrives and decides to throw in with his old friend (Appaloosa, 2005) once more, the stage seems set for a showdown between the two legendary pairs of gunslingers as they eye each other from the saloons they've signed on to keep orderly. But Parker, in a pleasing twist, allows all four to sidestep the turf war between Wolfson and O'Malley for the land and limited wealth of Resolution, and to join forces against Wolfson's company store, which has been squeezing them dry. Cole calmly predicts that Wolfson will dismiss his inconveniently activist gunslingers only after he's found replacements prepared to stand against them, and that's exactly what happens. Jettisoning the increasingly feeble mysteries that have been the weakest part of his recent thrillers (Stranger in Paradise,2008, etc.), Parker focuses on what he does best-ritualistically clipped dialogue and manly posturing-and serves up a reminder of just how much hardboiled fiction owes the Western.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Robert B. Parker was the author of more than fifty books. He died in January 2010.

Biography

Robert B. Parker began as a student of hard-boiled crime writers such as Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler, but when he became a crime writer himself, he was one of the rare contemporary authors to be considered on par with his predecessors. The Spenser series, featuring a Boston-based ex-boxer and ex-cop, is one of the genre's most respected and popular fixtures.

Noted for their sharp dialogue and fine character development, the Spenser books carry on a tradition while updating it, particularly in giving its hero two strong alter egos in Hawk, a black friend and right-hand man; and Susan Silverman, Spenser's psychologist love interest. Parker's inclusion of other races and sexual persuasions (several of his novels feature gay characters, a sensibility strengthened in Parker through his sons, both of whom are gay) give a more modern feel to the cases coming into Spenser's office.

The Spenser series, which began with 1973's The Godwulf Manuscript, has an element of toughness that suits its Boston milieu; but it delves just as often into the complex relationship between Silverman and Spenser, and the interplay between the P.I. and Hawk.

By the late ‘80s, Parker had acquired such a reputation that the agent for Raymond Chandler's estate tapped him to finish the legend's last book, Poodle Springs. It was a thankless mission bound to earn criticism, but Parker carried off the task well, thanks to his gift for to-the-point writing and deft plotting. "Parker isn't, even here, the writer Chandler was, but he's not a sentimentalist, and he darkens and deepens Marlowe," the Atlantic concluded. In 1991, Parker took a second crack at Chandler with the Big Sleep sequel Perchance to Dream.

Parker took other detours from Spenser over the years. In 1999, Family Honor introduced Sunny Randall, a female Boston private eye Parker created with actress Helen Hunt in mind. Two years earlier, he introduced L.A.-to-New England cop transplant Jesse Stone in Night Passage. He also authored four bestselling Westerns featuring Virgil Cole and Everett Hitch, a few young adult books, as well as several stand-alone novels that were well-received by his many fans.

Parker died suddenly in January 2010 while at home at his desk, working on a book. The cause was a heart attack. He was seventy-seven.

Good To Know

Parker's thesis in graduate school was a study of the private eye in literature that centered on Raymond Chandler, Dashiell Hammett and Ross MacDonald. Critics would later put him in the same category as those authors.

Parker's main hero is named for Edmund Spenser, the 16th-century author of The Faerie Queene.

Parker had a hand in writing the scripts for some television adaptations of Spenser books starring Robert Urich, who also played Spenser in the ABC series from 1985-88. Urich suffered a battle with cancer and passed away in 2002, but adaptations continue to be made for A&E, starring Joe Mantegna. Parker approved of the new actor, telling the New York Times: ''I looked at Joe and I saw Spenser."

According to a profile in the New York Times, Parker met his wife Joan when the two were toddlers at a birthday party. The two reconnected as freshmen at Colby College and eventually had two sons. They credit the survival of their marriage to a house split into separate living spaces, so that the two can enjoy more independent lives than your average husband and wife.

Parker told fans in a 1999 Barnes & Noble.com chat that he thought his non-series historical novel All Our Yesterdays was "the best thing I've ever written."

Parker had a small speaking part in the 1997 A&E adaptation of Small Vices. How does he have time to write his Spenser books, plus the other series and the adaptation stuff? "Keep in mind, it takes me four or five months to write a novel, which leaves me a lot of time the rest of the year," he told Book magazine. "I don't like to hang around."

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    1. Date of Birth:
      September 17, 1932
    2. Place of Birth:
      Springfield, Massachusetts
    1. Date of Death:
      January 18, 2010
    2. Place of Death:
      Cambridge, Massachusetts
    1. Education:
      B.A. in English, Colby College, 1954; M.A., Ph. D. in English, Boston University, 1957, 1971
    2. Website:

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 62 )
Rating Distribution

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(21)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 62 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 18, 2009

    Fun Read

    Robert B. Parker's books are easy reads...quick and fun. The characters come to life and you like them and can't wait to see what they do next. Very interesting stories and great dialog.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2008

    Spenser rides again

    Parker has again written a two main character talky (albeit, expletive loaded)novel that is a fast read. Certainly, big print and wide margins help with speed of the read. Characters are developed well for me(a Parker strength)even though I did not read the predecessor Apaloosa. But, Parker of late is writing the spirit of Spenser/Hawk into each of his books regardless of the character's names. Maybe that's a penalty of writing so many novels about a handful of characters. Years ago he was much broader. His 1994 All Our Yesterday's was quite different and quite well done. Yet, I enjoyed this book and will continue to buy and read all Parker writes.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2008

    A Great read

    I got this for fathers day and devoured it - a witty, funny fowl mouthed fast moving book that was just a pleasure to read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 6, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    good story line - love Virgil & Everett!

    only thing I didn't like about this series of books was (a) the F-bomb dropped way too much -- it is totally unnecessary to the story and (b) this is not a romance novel so let's drop the explicit sexual descriptive - also not necessary to the story -- other than that - it's a good story!

    I won't be buying any more Parker books, because he feels the need to drop the F-bomb in all of them apparently - including the Jesse Stone series - bummer!

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  • Posted May 17, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Robert B. Parker - Will be missed.

    What can I say? Anything that Robert Parker writes you just know will be a total success and a great read. His writing about the Old West not only takes you back to that era but also lets you see that some of the problems they faced are problems that we still face. Good should always triumph over evil - even if the people doing the good are questionable. There is a code among people that they adhere to even if you would not expect it from them. This series about Virgil Cole and Everett Hitch is highly enjoyable and an easy ready. Once you start, you can't put it down.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Resolution - predictable

    The book was an extremely easy read and very predictable. I did not read the first book in the Series, but was able to pick up on the characters and their development with ease. The plot as I said was very predictable with no exciting twists or turns. Mr. Parker did a good job in describing the town, surrounding area, and era. I was able to picture in my mind the setting and buildings, etc. A decent read, but not a must read.

    I much prefer his Jess Stone or Sunny Randal series.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2010

    Laid back story

    A good continuation of Appoloosa with a laid back narrative of events mixed with believable western action. If you enjoyed either the book or movie of Appoloosa, you would enjoy this book.

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  • Posted April 26, 2010

    Escapism At Its Best

    This was the my first Robert B. Parker book. I enjoyed so much that I bought five more. The author does a great job of describing the dirty, wild and unsettled nature of the "old west". The good guys and bad guys are easy to identify. This is simple, straight forward story that allows the reader to relax for a few hours. The book is a nice break from readig serious historial texts.

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  • Posted April 19, 2010

    One of Robert Parker's finest literary works that stirs an emotion down deep inside which makes you extremely thankful that you could again experience it.

    I thought that Appaloosa was excellent but with Resolution coming out, it makes a perfect combination from one of the best authors that I have read. It is a shame that Mr. Parker has passed in that this type of work will no longer be available to future generations. It was an excellent exerience that places you into the minds of the characters and makes you yearn to have been part of the whole plot as it stirs emotions and feelings that have been suppressed far too long. I experienced feelings both from childhood and adulthood that I had not felt for years and I just couldn't put the book down for any period of time.

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  • Posted March 31, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Easy Reading

    If you are a true western fan this may not hold up to your standards....
    The story is some what slow through most of the pages until about the last third. Good start and ending. Easy to follow plot and characters.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2010

    Typical Robert Parker

    If you liked Appoloosa or are a Robert Parker fan you will enjoy this book. Very shallow plot, but fun and clever dialog. Great for the beach or a rainy day.

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  • Posted January 7, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Cole and Hitch reunited and it feels so right

    This is the second book of The Virgil Cole and Everett Hitch Series. I read Appaloosa because the movie looked interesting and I got hooked on the series. I love how easy and laid back these characters can be most of the time but how tough and rough they can be. I have only read one other western, Shane. Virgil and Cole are a lot different but in a refreshing way. There's just something about these two men that is so different and refreshing for good guys. Want to know more, check out the summary.

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  • Posted November 13, 2009

    Another Robert B. Parker winner!

    Parker is one of my favorite authors, and I read everything he writes. I love his writing style and really appreciate his sense of humor. Virgil and Hitch are my Old Western Spencer and Hawk. Great characters, quick, engaging writing with lots of chuckles.

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  • Posted October 20, 2009

    The best parts of the old west.

    Parker brings these characters to life and humanity.

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  • Posted September 14, 2009

    Men of few words

    What a relationship! Our favorite good, bad guys are back having cleaned up Appaloosa. They don't say much because they know each others actions so well. Just short of being 'broke back'.

    Easy, light, predictable. Fun and great escape.

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  • Posted August 15, 2009

    Everything you want in a Western

    For Parker fans, it's Spencer and Hawk in the ol' West. For Western fans, it's everything you'll want: Stoic heros who say "sir" and "mam" before the shooting starts; Desperate desperadoes; Snake like city-dwelling evil-doers who aren't man enough to settle their own affairs; beautiful ladies in need of saving; and a ending ride into the sunset and further adventures.

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  • Posted July 20, 2009

    Great if you like westerns

    Reminds me of Lonesome Dove and the Dead wood series on HBO

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2009

    Great

    Love this book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2009

    Robert B. Parker is one of my favorite authors.

    I have read just about every book he has written. This one is just as good as all the rest. They are quick reads. The characters are likeable, even the bad guys.

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  • Posted May 21, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Good Western Lore

    I listened to the CD, did not read the book. I might have done better to read. The CD version had too many "I said" "Virgil said" "....said". I think the story could have flowed better without repeating every "said". But I did like the western style and the story line was good.

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