Resource Sharing Today: A Practical Guide to Interlibrary Loan, Consortial Circulation, and Global Cooperation

Overview


Budget constraints challenge collection development in unprecedented ways. Collection development has increasingly become a cooperative effort among libraries in geographic proximity. When their own library doesn’t have certain books or journals, users turn to interlibrary loan to obtain the resources they need. However, many library science degree programs don't cover interlibrary loan.

Resource Sharing Today is a practical guide to resource sharing starting with the library ...

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Resource Sharing Today: A Practical Guide to Interlibrary Loan, Consortial Circulation, and Global Cooperation

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Overview


Budget constraints challenge collection development in unprecedented ways. Collection development has increasingly become a cooperative effort among libraries in geographic proximity. When their own library doesn’t have certain books or journals, users turn to interlibrary loan to obtain the resources they need. However, many library science degree programs don't cover interlibrary loan.

Resource Sharing Today is a practical guide to resource sharing starting with the library across town and ending with libraries on the other side of the globe. Chapters cover everything from the ALA’s interlibrary loan form to successful innovations such as Virginia Tech’s ILLiad to New York’s IDS (Information Delivery Service). Appendices include regional, state, national, and international ILL codes, ALA and IFLA forms, open access agreements, and purchase on demand plans.

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Editorial Reviews

Claire McInerney
For experienced librarians and newly degreed librarians alike, Resource Sharing Today is a valuable read. Dr. Corinne Nyquist presents a broad and deep look at the practice of sharing resources and Inter-Library Loan services including the intricacies of different types of collaboration to locate the materials that patrons need. One of the most well-used library services deserves a book that covers the topic from its history to current practices, and any library professional who works in a setting that has ILL services should order and read this.
Judy Fischetti
Corinne Nyquist is an expert and an authority on interlibrary loan (ILL) and resource sharing. She explores many aspects of ILL in depth in this book. Beginning as well as experienced ILL staff will learn much from her.
Suzanne M. Ward
Library school students usually only hear about resource sharing topics in passing. New librarians as well as seasoned practitioners who accept positions in interlibrary loan often feel at sea learning both the broad concepts as well as the operational details with little direction from supervisors unfamiliar with the daily routine. Nyquist’s book is an essential guide through the maze of topics related to contemporary resource sharing.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780810888036
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 7/28/2014
  • Pages: 213
  • Sales rank: 1,102,007
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.17 (h) x 0.55 (d)

Meet the Author

Corinne Nyquist is a librarian at the Sojourner Truth Library at the State University of New York at New Paltz, and has been a librarian for over forty years in public and academic libraries in the United States—New York, Illinois, Minnesota, Montana, and in Africa—Sudan and South Africa. She has been in charge of interlibrary loan for over 25 years and has been active in the ALA RUSA STARS (Sharing and Transforming Access to Resources Section) as well as in the Rethinking Resource Sharing group. She was a member of the ALA Committee that revised the Interlibrary Loan Code for the United States in 2008. She is currently a member of the ALA Library School Accreditation External Review Panel.
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Table of Contents

Introduction
Acknowledgments

PART I: BUILDING AN EFFICIENT RESOURCE DELIVERY SYSTEM

1. Teaching Each Other ILL, Since the Library Schools Won’t Do It
ILL departments cooperate and guide each other. You need an introduction to the modes of communication.

2. MARC: Library of Congress Did It, But Now It Must Change
Cataloging changes to get patrons information quicker but challenges the traditional attributes of good cataloging.

3. How to Get OCLC To Listen To Us
OCLC provides valuable services for ILL. How can we share our concerns with this powerful vendor?

4. Innovation Can Come From Us
ILLiad was created at Virginia Tech, but it is only one of the exciting ideas originating in libraries.

5. Rethinking Resource Sharing: The Future of Interlibrary Loan.
A movement, we should join, started with a manifesto in 2005 to “rethink resource sharing for the 21st century.”

PART II: ADDING PERSONALIZED HIGH QUALITY SERVICE

6. Don’t Just Say “No” When Faced With Rules and Policies
Follow ALA codes as well as Copyright law and CONTU guidelines. Review library policies and agreements.

7. Showing Users What They Missed In the Library: ILL as Reference
Patrons request obscure materials but overlook items in the collection. Collaborate with reference and others.

8. Buy or Borrow: Getting What the Patron Needs
Buying books unavailable in the region gives patrons a collection building role. These books don’t gather dust.

9. Conundrums: A Confusing and Difficult Problem or Question
They include Cancellations, Cataloging, Challenges, Citations, Cooperation, Codes, and most of all Cost.

10. Going Global Is Easier Than You Think
Overseas services, shipping procedures, and payment methods will all be explained.

11. On the Spot ILL: What We Could Do better With the ALA Form
Serve consortial patrons, but also others with need clearly stated needs and proof of home library responsibility.

12. Enhancing Discovery: Taking an Interest in Local Stuff
Collect campus and regional publications to prepare for an ILL request tracking provenance.

Appendix 1: Code of Ethics of the American Library Association
Appendix 2: Interlibrary Loan Code for the United States
Appendix 3: Interlibrary Loan Code for the United States Explanatory Supplement
Appendix 4: ALA and ARL Response to the Section 108 Study Group Regarding Interlibrary Loan and Other Copies for Users
Appendix 5: Interlibrary Loans: ALA Library Fact Sheet Number 8
Appendix 6: Five Things Every New Resource Sharing Librarian Should Know
Appendix 7: About IFLA
Appendix 8: IFLA Guidelines for Best Practice in Interlibrary Loan and Document Delivery
Appendix 9: Illinois State Library: Libraries Very Interested in Sharing (LVIS) Factsheet

Index
About the author

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