Respect for Acting

( 9 )

Overview

"Uta Hagen wanted us never to settle, period, to keep on endlesslyexploring, digging deeper, and aiming higher in our scenes, in ourplays, in our careers. Respect for Acting is not a long book, andwith any luck, it will take you the rest of your life to readit."
David Hyde Pierce (from the Foreword)

Legendary actress and teacher Uta Hagen knew that an actor'sfinest work was often achieved for love rather than for money. Shelived this philosophy alongside her husband, Herbert ...

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Overview

"Uta Hagen wanted us never to settle, period, to keep on endlesslyexploring, digging deeper, and aiming higher in our scenes, in ourplays, in our careers. Respect for Acting is not a long book, andwith any luck, it will take you the rest of your life to readit."
David Hyde Pierce (from the Foreword)

Legendary actress and teacher Uta Hagen knew that an actor'sfinest work was often achieved for love rather than for money. Shelived this philosophy alongside her husband, Herbert Berghof, at HBStudio, their acting school in New York. It was there that theycreated a workplace and spiritual home for actors such as RobertDeNiro, Jack Lemmon, Anne Bancroft, and Bette Midler.

Respect for Acting is Hagen's blueprint for the actor,her design for "enlightened stage acting." This classic book hashelped generations of actors hone their craft, and its advice is asuseful now as it was when it was first published. Hagen draws onher own struggle with the techniques of acting as well as herdecades of teaching experience to break down the areas in whichactors can work and search for realities in themselves that servethe character and the play. This approach helps actors to bespecific in their actions in order to communicate an artisticstatement. Hagen's instructions and examples also guide theaspiring actor through practical problems such as "How do I talk tothe audience?" and "How do I stay fresh in a long run?"

Part One, "The Actor," deals with the actor's concept ofhim or herself, as well as techniques that set an actor in motionphysically, verbally, and emotionally.

Part Two, "The Object Exercises," offers specific anddetailed work for the actor, covering a broad range of problems andcircumstances, from making an entrance to using the FourthWall.

Part Three, "The Play and the Role," covers how toapproach the play and identify with the character the actor willundertake. It also shares practical thoughts and answers thequestions young actors ask most.

Uta Hagen's influence endures in many of today's most compellingstage and screen performances. Informative and inspiring,Respect for Acting will bring her timeless techniques toactors and audiences for years to come.

This is a book for people who respect--or wish they could--the theatre on both sides of the footlights, for the actor and audience who favor truth in a creative process. The constructive stages of work delve into performance as well as the issues surrounding a necessary change in the theatre. Among Hagen's distinguished students were Jack Lemmon, Geraldine Page, and Jason Robards.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470228487
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 7/7/2008
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 107,013
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Uta Hagen was the recipient of innumerable honors and awards during her long career, including the prestigious National Medal of Arts in 2003. She died in 2004 at the age of 84.
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Table of Contents

Foreword by David Hyde Pierce.

Acknowledgments.

PART ONE.

The Actor.

Introduction.

1. Concept.

2. Identity.

3. Substitution.

4. Emotional Memory.

5. Sense Memory.

6. The Five Senses.

7. Thinking.

8. Walking and Talking.

9. Improvisation.

10. Reality.

PART TWO.

The Object Exercises.

Introduction.

11. The Basic Object Exercise.

12. Three Entrances.

13. Immediacy.

14. The Fourth Wall.

15. Endowment.

16. Talking to Yourself.

17. Outdoors.

18. Conditioning Forces.

19. History.

20. Character Action.

PART THREE.

The Play and the Role.

Introduction.

21. First Contact with the Play.

22. The Character.

23. Circumstances.

24. Relationship.

25. The Objective.

26. The Obstacle.

27. The Action.

28. The Rehearsal.

29. Practical Problems.

30. Communication.

31. Style.

Epilogue.

Index.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 9 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 12 of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 9, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Great Book, better if you buy it on Nook Color.

    Uta hagen is the meaning of acting she knows her stuff inside out. It's amazing how she describles each lesson with so much detail.You would have to read this book many times before you actually get everything.I will carry this book forever, what makes it better is that you can get it on your Nook Color and highlight and take notes which makes it make easier instead of writing all the time.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2004

    Uta Hagen has Established the 'Best in Theater Text'

    As a theater major in the early 80's this was the text used at Conservatory. Now some 20 odd years later I use it in my Performance classes. This is a must for the would be, should be and will be actor. Brava Madame Hagen!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2000

    A Good Start for an Actor

    Miss Uta created a very usefull book for an actor needing a good start in technique or someone just trying to review...it is very easy to read, understand and apply!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 18, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    Practical and Honest Account on Life as an Actor This is only t

    Practical and Honest Account on Life as an Actor

    This is only the second book on acting I have read so far, the first one being Boleslavsky's Acting: The First Six Lessons, so naturally I've been comparing the two a lot while reading. I love Uta Hagen's book stresses the craft part of acting with highly practical exercises. This is definitely in line with Boleslavsky who stresses that the art of acting cannot be taught but that techniques can be learned to perfect the tools of concentration, poise, and projection, to name a few. I have found both books really great preparation for my first workshop, which is coming up soon!

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