Responding To Defense Dependence

Overview

The 1970s and 1980s witnessed growing concern in the United States regarding the relative decline of the American economy and, for defense planners, the military's growing dependence on foreign production of weapons' parts and subcomponents—the guts of many critical weapons systems. The period also witnessed growing interest in industrial policy as a tool for promoting U.S. international competitiveness, defense sectors proving to be particularly attractive candidates for government economic intervention. This ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$107.16
BN.com price
(Save 3%)$110.95 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (3) from $116.20   
  • New (2) from $116.20   
  • Used (1) from $174.45   
Sending request ...

Overview

The 1970s and 1980s witnessed growing concern in the United States regarding the relative decline of the American economy and, for defense planners, the military's growing dependence on foreign production of weapons' parts and subcomponents—the guts of many critical weapons systems. The period also witnessed growing interest in industrial policy as a tool for promoting U.S. international competitiveness, defense sectors proving to be particularly attractive candidates for government economic intervention. This study traces the evolution of defense dependence and the U.S. government's response to this dilemma by examining policy ideas and experiments in four defense industries—machine tools, semiconductor manufacturing, ball bearings, and high-definition television technologies—explaining successes and failures, and reviewing prospects for expansion.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Not a 12-step program to help governments or companies kick habits they fell into during the Cold War, but an investigation into how those habits can be maintained. Documents how the US government is buying an increasing share of military supplies from other countries; analyzes the economic impact on the machine-tool, semiconductor, and bearings industries; and addresses the extent to which concern for the health of domestic industry should outweigh any financial savings for the military. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780275953133
  • Publisher: ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/20/1996
  • Pages: 208
  • Lexile: 1430L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

ERIK R. PAGES is Director of the Office of Economic Conversion Information at the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Illustrations
Abbreviations
Foreword
Preface
1 Sounding the Alarm: Recognizing Defense Dependence 1
2 Explaining Responses to Dependence 31
3 Ideas and the American Defense Industrial Base 51
4 Relief for the Machine Tool Industry? 73
5 The Semiconductor and Semiconductor Manufacturing Industries and the Creation of Sematech 89
6 Yet Another Call to Arms: Revitalizing the Bearings Industry 109
7 HDTV: A Strategic Industry at Risk? 127
8 Conclusions 145
Bibliography 161
Index 187
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)