Restoration London: Engaging Anecdotes And Tantalizing Trivia From The Most Magnificent And Renowned City Of Europe

Overview

Here is seventeenth-century London as you've never seen it. The Restoration of Charles II marked a period of growth in colonization and trade, the rise of political parties, and an increase in the power of Parliament. Restoration London provides a fascinating look at everyday life in the city during that time. Using diaries, almanacs, newspapers, advice books, government papers, personal documents, and more, Liza Picard brilliantly portrays the human side of both ordinary daily living and catastrophic events. We ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (17) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $8.98   
  • Used (14) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$8.98
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(21)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
New Shelf wear.

Ships from: Cartersville, GA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$12.43
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(100)

Condition: New
2000-03-01 Paperback New Ships USPS with tracking number. We ship daily from Tennessee!

Ships from: knoxville, TN

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$60.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(164)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Here is seventeenth-century London as you've never seen it. The Restoration of Charles II marked a period of growth in colonization and trade, the rise of political parties, and an increase in the power of Parliament. Restoration London provides a fascinating look at everyday life in the city during that time. Using diaries, almanacs, newspapers, advice books, government papers, personal documents, and more, Liza Picard brilliantly portrays the human side of both ordinary daily living and catastrophic events. We see a fire out of control, leaving a great and prosperous city buried in its own ruins. We witness an enormous rebuilding, with determination from the people and a Proclamation from Charles that London would be "a much more beautiful city than that consumed."

From the splendor of lovely English gardens to pollution-filled air and streets clogged with waste and rubbish; from graceful living, fashionable clothes, and elegant décor to medical risks, plagues, accidents, and early deaths, this unique book describes the simple pleasures and the overwhelming difficulties of the time. We discover the craft of cabinet making, the art of embroidery, and the revival of theater. We are shown the importance of astrology, magic, and superstition in medical care, the labor of housework and shopping, the pleasures of music and dancing, the hazards of sex, the limitations of education, the nature of the laws, the conflicting views of the churches, and the extremes of poverty and wealth.

With meticulous detail and vivid descriptions, Restoration London shows us the people who lived there and gives us a better understanding of who they were.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780380732364
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 3/1/2000
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.88 (d)

Meet the Author

Liza Picard was born in Essex in 1927, the youngest daughter of the village doctor. She read law at the London School of Economics and qualified as a barrister; however, she chose not to practice. She worked for many years in the office of the Solicitor of the Inland Revenue and lived in Gray's Inn and Hackney before retiring in Oxford.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

London

Facts and figures



England in 1660 was prosperous. Few people died of hunger, unlike the peasants on the continent. Waves of enclosures had swept away medieval hovels from English fields, and farming methods were slowly improving as Dutch technology spread. Wool was still the country's mainstay In medieval times, it had been exported 'unwrought'; it now went through a series of labour-intensive processes, which resulted in lighter weight, fashion-conscious fabrics ('the new draperies'). Textile finishing was largely concentrated in London. Newcastle sent coal down to London ('sea-coal') in fleets of collier ships, hundreds at a time. Lead was mined in Derbyshire, tin and copper in the West Country, iron in the Forest of Dean. They were all channelled to London.

The population of England was just over 5 million. In villages, solidly built houses clustered round the dual sources of refreshment, Church and Inn. A network of seven or eight hundred market towns provided for the business and social needs of their inhabitants, and of the country dwellers within a comfortable radius. The total population of the five major provincial cities, Norwich, Bristol, Newcastle, York and Exeter, was only 80,000.

Over 300,000 people, getting on for one in sixteen of the population, lived in London. In the known world, only Paris and Constantinople were bigger and they were flagging. London's steady increase had by 1700 outstripped Paris, and by 1750, Constantinople.

'London' comprised: (1) the square mile within the Roman walls, and small areas to the west at Blackfriars, and to the south, across London Bridge, atSouthwark. This was the City of London, administered in 26 wards by the Lord Mayor of London and the Common Council of Aldermen. Its population had declined by 20,000 between 1640 and 1660. (2) The 'suburbs'. The rich and fashionable were filling the space between the Roman city of Londinium and the Danish foundation at Westminster. The middle classes were moving west as well, and north towards Hackney. The poor, particularly the thousands dependent on the ship-building and carrying trades, migrated east along the river. The suburbs were booming.

The built-up area extended north to Clerkenwell, with ribbon development along the river and the approach roads. Before the Fire in 1666, the skyline was mainly flat, broken by the bulk of Westminster Abbey, the Banqueting Hall in Whitehall, and St Paul's Cathedral and the Tower in the City. The square medieval church towers did not punctuate the skyline gracefully, as Wren's spires were to do.

The street layout had not changed since the Romans left. The traveller from Kent, or Europe, approached London by 'Kentish Street', through Southwark and across London Bridge. If he was heading north, a straight road led through the city and out by Bishopsgate, towards Hackney.The main east-west axis was Cheapside. From it, Fleet Street and the Strand led towards Westminster. To the east, through Aldgate, lay the open fields. Thames Street, along the river, was constantly blocked with commercial traffic to and from the wharves and warehouses and the Customs House.

There was still only one bridge across the Thames. In 1663 the Lord Mayor petitioned Charles II for leave to set up two ferries 'on account of the straitness [narrowness] and trouble of passing London Bridge'. The Royal Surveyor of Works supported the petition, 'as being the only expedient to ease the Bridge . . . from the multitude of carts drays and drifts of cattle, since His Majesty would not admit of another bridge'. His Majesty promised to think about it; if he did, nothing came of it. In 1664 he was faced with a detailed plan for a bridge between Westminster and Lambeth, to be funded by a toll and a voluntary contribution from "neighbouring gentry"-- with the same result

London was the principalcity of England. The development of industrial conurbations in the Midlands was still centuries away. The London needle-makers' monopoly for instance, covered London and 10 miles round, outside that radius, the trade was shared with Worcester. The manufacture of cutlery was shared with Sheffield. But luxury trades were wholly concentrated in London, and far away the largest national source of income was the new trade of cloth finishing, almost wholly concentrated in London.

Finaciers were evolving more sophisticated banking systems, their base was London. Lawyers were well placed in the Inns of Court, including the Temple, which they had taken over when the Order of Knights Templars was dissolved in the fourteenth century; fast boats took them to their commercial clients in the City, or upriver to the law courts at Westminster. The spiritual life of London was supervised from Lambeth, Westminster and St Paul's. The monarchy was established at the Palace of Whitehall, built by Cardinal Wolsey close to the Abbey, and acquired by Henry VIII on Wolsey's downfall. Lastly, London was England's major port, with a safe harbour for sea-going vessels, facilities for building, repairing and supplying ships, and thousands of experienced seamen.

The combination of all these functions in one city goes far to explain London's disproportionate size, compared to other English cities, and to European capitals, where the monarch or the merchants or the shippers might reside in separate places.

It produced a polyglot, colourful crowd. Young people up from the country to serve an apprenticeship or enter domestic service gaped at English grandees in velvet-lined coaches, and fine ladies in sedan chairs escorted by liveried servants and African slave boys. Street sellers and mountebanks rubbed shoulders with sailors and beggars. Foreign languages and Latin vied with the country accents of young gentlemen up from the provinces.

In all this confusion, important announcements needed all the emphasis they could get. The Dutch Ambassador, Van Gogh, described the Proclamation announcing the declaration of war against his country, on 22 February 1664:

On Saturday last, the King's declaration was solemnly proclaimed.Two . . .


Restoration London. Copyright © by Liza Picard. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)