Restorative Neurology: Advances in Pharmacotherapy for Recovery after Stroke / Edition 1

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Overview

This timely and thorough book focuses on pharmacotherapeutical strategies for facilitating the functional recovery of patients with stroke-related neurological impairments. Clinicians should find the sections on measuring stroke-related impairments and disabilities, clinical data of drug effects on recovery, and the use of antidepressant medications during the recovery period, to be of particular practical interest. By providing a broad overview of current studies - and an insight analysis of their clinical implications - the reader will surely gain a more confident understanding of how these emerging pharmacotherapies can work to enhance the recovery of stroke patients.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

This timely and thorough book focuses on pharmacotherapeutical strategies for facilitating the functional recovery of patients with stroke-related neurological impairments. It also provides an in-depth overview of current concepts of the neurobiology underlying spontaneous recovery after brain injury; a detailed review of the potential of new neuroimaging techniques to provide insights into the dynamic changes that occur in the brain as it recovers from stroke; the most current data of the effects of pharmacological manipulations of specific neurotransmitter systems on post-stroke recovery; Clinicians should find the sections on measuring stroke-related impairments and disabilities, clinical data of drug effects on recovery, and the use of antidepressant medications during the recovery period to be of particular practical interest. By providing a broad overview of current studies:and an insightful analysis of their clinical implications:the reader will surely gain a more confident understanding of how these emerging pharmacotherapies can work to enhance the recovery of stroke patients.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Sean D. Ruland, DO (University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine)
Description: This book deals with the topics of neuroprotection and the promotion of neuro-recovery following ischemic insult to the brain.
Purpose: The underlying premise here, from the author's point of view, is to "provide a bridge between the basic laboratory and the clinic" — a worthwhile endeavor from my perspective. However intrigued and refreshed I was reading this book, I feel it fell somewhat short of the objectives, not because of the author's approach or presentation, but simply because of technical limitations of what is known and has been researched to this point in history. Specifically, the bulk of the information is still at a research level with implications for further studies, without much in the way of clinically useful applications at this time.
Audience: According to the author, the book is written for both bench scientists and clinicians who are involved in the neurosciences. The book is properly targeted at these audiences, although it must be understood that clinicians reading this book for information that would augment their practices now may be disappointed.
Features: When I first received this book for review, I made an erroneous assumption from the title that this was a compilation of neuro-rehabilitative-pharmacological "pearls." I quickly learned that such was not the case. Rather, it is a review of all, or most, of the research done to (publication) date of theories of neuroprotection following insult; neuromodulation and its augmentation; stimulation of nerve growth and differentiation of progenitor cells; theories of diaschisis and depression after stroke; as well as what has helped and what has hurt from a pharmacological perspective. The vast majority of this research has been done in animal models and not in humans, thus the limitations to clinical applications. The illustrations are rather bland; they could have been improved upon using diagrams and flow charts to support the text. At times, the recapitulation of all the lists of animal trials on a particular concept gets lengthy. There isn't really any unique mode of presentation of this material, just interesting and intriguing concepts.
Assessment: After I had realized the nature of the content of this book, I soon found myself unable to put it down. (I finished it leisurely in under three days.) Much of the information that is being referred to in "bits and pieces" during seminars, guest lectures, and grand rounds is here in more elaborate and complete form. This is not a book to sit on a shelf for reference either, as technology quickly will overtake these concepts. I think, though, that anyone interested in what's been done in the past, what's going on currently, and where we're headed in this exciting field of neurobiochemical research will enjoy reading this book. To date, I am not aware of another text that compares to this one.
Sean D. Ruland
This book deals with the topics of neuroprotection and the promotion of neuro-recovery following ischemic insult to the brain. The underlying premise here, from the author's point of view, is to "provide a bridge between the basic laboratory and the clinic" -- a worthwhile endeavor from my perspective. However intrigued and refreshed I was reading this book, I feel it fell somewhat short of the objectives, not because of the author's approach or presentation, but simply because of technical limitations of what is known and has been researched to this point in history. Specifically, the bulk of the information is still at a research level with implications for further studies, without much in the way of clinically useful applications at this time. According to the author, the book is written for both bench scientists and clinicians who are involved in the neurosciences. The book is properly targeted at these audiences, although it must be understood that clinicians reading this book for information that would augment their practices now may be disappointed. When I first received this book for review, I made an erroneous assumption from the title that this was a compilation of neuro-rehabilitative-pharmacological "pearls." I quickly learned that such was not the case. Rather, it is a review of all, or most, of the research done to (publication) date of theories of neuroprotection following insult; neuromodulation and its augmentation; stimulation of nerve growth and differentiation of progenitor cells; theories of diaschisis and depression after stroke; as well as what has helped and what has hurt from a pharmacological perspective. The vast majority of this research has beendone in animal models and not in humans, thus the limitations to clinical applications. The illustrations are rather bland; they could have been improved upon using diagrams and flow charts to support the text. At times, the recapitulation of all the lists of animal trials on a particular concept gets lengthy. There isn't really any unique mode of presentation of this material, just interesting and intriguing concepts. After I had realized the nature of the content of this book, I soon found myself unable to put it down. (I finished it leisurely in under three days.) Much of the information that is being referred to in "bits and pieces" during seminars, guest lectures, and grand rounds is here in more elaborate and complete form. This is not a book to sit on a shelf for reference either, as technology quickly will overtake these concepts. I think, though, that anyone interested in what's been done in the past, what's going on currently, and where we're headed in this exciting field of neurobiochemical research will enjoy reading this book. To date, I am not aware of another text that compares to this one.
Booknews
Comprises 14 contributions addressing the care of patients with cerebrovascular disease. Topics include brain injury and theories of recovery, acetylcholine and recovery of function following brain injury, neurotrophic factors and transplants, the role of neuroimaging in stroke recovery, potential impact of drugs on poststroke motor recovery, and antidepressant effects on recovery. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780879934071
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 1/28/1998
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 321
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 0.92 (d)

Table of Contents

Contributors.

Preface.

1. Brain Injury and Theories of Recovery (D.G. Stein).

2. Mechanisms of Noradrenergic Modulation of Physical Therapy: Effects on Functional Recovery After Cortical Injury (D.M. Feeney).

3. Acetylocholinle and Recovery of Function Following Brain Injury (R.M. Saponjic, M.R. Hoane, T.M. Barth).

4. GABAergic Drugs and Neuroplasticity after Brain Injury: Impact on Functional Recovery (T. Schallert, T.D. Hernandez).

5. Effects of Glutamate Antagonists on the Recovery and Maintenance of Behavioral Functions After Brain Injury (T.M. Barth, M.R. Hoane, S. Barbay).

6. Neurotrophic Factors and Transplants (B.B. Johansson).

7. Ganglioside Treatments in Animal Models of Stroke (G.L. Dunbar).

8. CDPD-Choline (Citicoline): Potential Mechanisms of Action and Preliminary Results in Human Stroke (I. Lopez-Coviella, W.M. Clark, S. Warach, B. Sandage, J. Agut, J.A. Ortiz, R.J. Wurtman)\.

9. The Role of Neuroimaging in Stroke Recovery (Y. Samson, P. Belin, P. Remy, M. Zilbovicius, L. Spelle, G. Rancurel).

10. Measuring Recovery of Function After Stroke: Clinical and Measurement Issues in Selecting Stroke Outcome Measures in Clinical Trials (P.W. Duncan).

11. Potential Impact of Drugs on Post-Stroke Motor Recovery (L.B. Goldstein).

12. Pharmacotherapy in the Treatment of Aphasia (D. Walker-Batson).

13. Antidepressant Effects on Recovery (I. Miyai, M. Reding).

14. Clnical Studies of the Effects of GM1 Ganglioside on Recovery From Ischemic Stroke (M. Alter).

Index.

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