Retail Anarchy: A Radical Shopper's Adventures in Consumption

Retail Anarchy: A Radical Shopper's Adventures in Consumption

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by Sam Pocker
     
 

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Why does no one blink when they are charged three dollars for a cup of coffee?

Why do grown men sleep on the street overnight to buy video game systems?

How do Dollar Stores cheerfully charge a dollar for a 25 cent pack of gum?

What are the pitfalls of Brand Name Loyalty?

And how do you get an entire car-full of pudding for free? “Stand-up economist”

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Overview

Why does no one blink when they are charged three dollars for a cup of coffee?

Why do grown men sleep on the street overnight to buy video game systems?

How do Dollar Stores cheerfully charge a dollar for a 25 cent pack of gum?

What are the pitfalls of Brand Name Loyalty?

And how do you get an entire car-full of pudding for free? “Stand-up economist” Sam Pocker delves into these hard-hitting questions—and the result is a fascinating, wry, and amusing account of consumers’ non-sensical habits and the stores that prey upon them. With a dash of vitriol and a dose of sarcasm, Pocker exposes the sheer inanity of marketing schemes, the plague of rude cashiers, and shows how the “little guy” can rise up and beat the system by outsmarting the stores with their overly-complicated rules for rebates. Retail Anarchy is a satirical look at the self-imposed consumer coma that America has fallen into—and Sam Pocker’s mission is to wake readers up!

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
From condescending ad campaigns to tricky math at the register, consumers may not realize everything they have to be upset about in the tanking economy. Self-trained economist Pocker, for one, is mad as hell, and thinks you should be too. In four wide-ranging "movements," Pocker tackles everything from Dollar General, Target and late electronics retailer The Wiz to Red Lobster and Coca-Cola to women's fashion and brand loyalty. Much of Pocker's observations are highly insightful, such as his story of ordering a Sausage McMuffin without egg and being charged for the egg anyway: "McDonald's would make an extra $95,000 a day simply... because nobody wants to look like a maniac demanding a nineteen-cent refund." Analysis of insulting marketing includes a Dominos Pizza-The Dark Knight promotion that gave pizza buyers online access to a movie trailer ("Apparently, no one at Dominos Pizza ever heard of YouTube"), and simple shopping tips ("complimentary alcoholic beverages... should present an enormous red flag") push back against retailer efforts to quash consumer common sense. Pocker is driven by crystal-clear X-ray vision and no shortage of indignant fury; the anger may not appeal to everyone, but Pocker's canny insight will resonate with any American shopper.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786746392
Publisher:
Running Press Book Publishers
Publication date:
03/31/2009
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
224
File size:
286 KB

Meet the Author

Sam Pocker is the creator and host of the popular (and outrageous) internet talk show YMMV Radio. He is also a full-time professional bargain hunter and tours the country as a “Stand-Up Economist.” He lives in New York City. Visit him at www.retailanarchy.com

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Retail Anarchy: A Radical Shopper's Adventures in Consumption 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
TrishNYC More than 1 year ago
Sam Pocker is a self described "stand up" economist which means he has no formal training in economics but believes himself qualified to make assessments about consumer habits. Mr. Pocker starts out being hilarious but his routine gets really old by the time you have to read 218 pages of it. He states many things that are true about American consumer behavior like spending ridiculous amounts of money at Starbucks for a cup of coffee, the exceedingly poor state of customer service and the gobs of money you could save if your use coupons. But all in all, Mr. Pocker comes across as a smug and snarky individual who believes that his way of retail shopping is the right and only way of making purchases. He is quick to tell you that retail store employees are rude, obnoxious. lacking in proper training and many times have no idea of what services the store they work for offers. While many of us can sympathize with this feeling as we have all had customer service experiences that have been less than encouraging, his response and reaction to this behavior is to act equally as obnoxious and annoying as the very people he criticizes. He proudly tells of buying things that he does not really need with coupons,rebates or whatever other money saving strategy he can employ and throwing the stuff away. I am truly at a loss as to how this makes sense. To him it is better that he, an educated shopper, buys all these needless quantities and then throws then away than a shopper who pays full price for just one or two units of the same product. For him the payoff is whatever coupons he earns from making these meaningless purchases that he can later use on other things. Its a bit bizarre and I think very few people will walk away from reading of his exploits in retail with a sense of admiration for the author. Yes, we should all clip coupons and use rebates whenever available. This is indeed sound advice. But traveling three states away because there is a sale on pudding or Kikkoman teriyaki sauce and making my entire house and car look like it is a grocery store warehouse is not in my opinion very smart.