Rethink (Chapter 6): Understand What Can (and Can't) Be Predicted [NOOK Book]

Overview

This is the eBook version of the printed book. If the print book includes a CD-ROM, this content is not included within the eBook version.

Read the following excerpt from Rethink, Chapter 6: Understand What Can (and Can’t) Be Predicted.

 

In the course of rethinking, you have learned how to identify your “whats,” determine their value and performance level, and figure out their connections to one another. The next step is to train the lens...

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Rethink (Chapter 6): Understand What Can (and Can't) Be Predicted

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Overview

This is the eBook version of the printed book. If the print book includes a CD-ROM, this content is not included within the eBook version.

Read the following excerpt from Rethink, Chapter 6: Understand What Can (and Can’t) Be Predicted.

 

In the course of rethinking, you have learned how to identify your “whats,” determine their value and performance level, and figure out their connections to one another. The next step is to train the lens of predictability on your stakeholders--customers, suppliers, and partners--to anticipate their responses to the plug-and-play changes you want to make.

 

One of the more dramatic--and potentially traumatic--examples of “what” unpredictability occurred some years ago, when Chrysler decided to examine the vendors supplying parts for its Jeep Cherokee. The analysis of the company’s Manufacture-Product “what” started with the V-8 engine assembled by Chrysler, focusing first on the rollerlifter valve. The valve was manufactured by Eaton, which, in turn, contracted with a neighboring factory to provide unfinished metal castings. That factory, it turned out, relied on yet another supplier for the special clay used in making the castings.

 

When the Chrysler team contacted the owner of the clay company, he dropped a bad-news bombshell. Selling clay to the castings maker was a losing proposition, he told them, so he was switching into a new business--kitty litter. Had he mentioned his plans to Chrysler’s castings supplier? Uh, no. Suppose Chrysler had never surveyed its Jeep Cherokee Manufacture-Product “what.” A for-want-of-a- nail scenario could have played out: no clay, no castings, no roller-lifter valve, no V-8 engine, no Jeep Cherokee.

 

Predicting how a “what” will behave under a new set of circumstances can be as difficult as it is essential. A case in point: the Boeing 787 Dreamliner.

 

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131366541
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 3/24/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 92 KB

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 13 of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Savvy guide to reorganizing your business operations

    Business architect Ric Merrifield says many executives get hung up on the "hows" of running a firm: the techniques, tactics and technologies their companies use to operate. In the process, they fail to focus on the all-important "whats" of their enterprises, that is, central functions like manufacturing quality products, fulfilling orders, satisfying customers and so on. Lost in superfluous details, these leaders can't see their real priorities. Merrifield says that for many such executives, basic rethinking is in order. In this book, he explains how to take a fresh look at your business to identify and prioritize your core activities. Although the metaphorical overload of "whats" and "hows" might make you want to ask, "Who's on first?" this is a solid take on leading innovation. getAbstract recommends it to any executives who suspect they may need to refocus or broaden their perspectives about their organizations.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2012

    Very brief and uncreative

    This book is literally a few handful of pages long and seems to be targeted to a specific situation. It takes precious time to explain words that don't need any explanation at all. Also, the reviews state that someone else has reviewed the book but I have seen no other reviews at all. Hmmmmm?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2012

    Test

    Tedt

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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