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Rethinking Innateness: A Connectionist Perspective on Development / Edition 1

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Overview

Rethinking Innateness asks the question, "What does it really mean to say that a behavior is innate?" The authors describe a new framework in which interactions, occurring at all levels, give rise to emergent forms and behaviors. These outcomes often may be highly constrained and universal,
yet are not themselves directly contained in the genes in any domain-specific way.

One of the key contributions of Rethinking Innateness is a taxonomy of ways in which a behavior can be innate. These include constraints at the level of representation, architecture, and timing; typically, behaviors arise through the interaction of constraints at several of these levels.The ideas are explored through dynamic models inspired by a new kind of "developmental connectionism," a marriage of connectionist models and developmental neurobiology,
forming a new theoretical framework for the study of behavioral development. While relying heavily on the conceptual and computational tools provided by connectionism,
Rethinking Innateness also identifies ways in which these tools need to be enriched by closer attention to biology.

The MIT Press

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What People Are Saying

From the Publisher
"Rethinking Innateness is a milestone as important as theappearance ten years ago of the PDP books. More integratedin its structure, more biological in its approach, this bookprovides a new theoretical framework for cognition that isbased on dynamics, growth, and learning. Study this book if youare interested in how minds emerge from developing brains." Terrence J. Sejnowski,Professor, Salk Institute forBiological Studies
Terrence J. Sejnowski

Rethinking Innateness is a milestone as important as the appearance ten years ago of the PDP books. More integrated in its structure,
more biological in its approach, this book provides a new theoretical framework for cognition that is based on dynamics, growth, and learning. Study this book if you are interested in how minds emerge from developing brains.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780262550307
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • Publication date: 1/28/1998
  • Series: Neural Network Modeling and Connectionism
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 450
  • Sales rank: 1,232,818
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.85 (d)

Table of Contents

Series foreword
Preface
Ch. 1 New perspectives on development 1
Ch. 2 Why connectionism? 47
Ch. 3 Ontogenetic development: A connectionist synthesis 107
Ch. 4 The shape of change 173
Ch. 5 Brain development 239
Ch. 6 Interactions, all the way down 319
Ch. 7 Rethinking innateness 357
References 397
Subject index 443
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