Rethinking the Color Line : Readings in Race and Ethnicity / Edition 5

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Overview

User-friendly without sacrificing intellectual or theoretical rigor, this anthology of current research examines contemporary issues and explores new approaches to the study of race and ethnic relations. The featured readings effectively engage students by helping them understand theories and concepts. Active learning in the classroom is encouraged while providing relevance for students from all ethnic, cultural, and economic backgrounds. The fifth edition features ten new articles on such timely topics as:

• The U.S. Census’ changing definition of race and ethnicity

• Race-based disparities in health

• Racial and gender discrimination among racial minorities and women

• Being Arab and American

• How social control maintains racial inequality

• The increase in black and brown incarceration

• How racial bias may affect the use of DNA to locate suspects of crimes

• How derogatory ethnic and racial images are created and disseminated by the media

• The sexualization of African American women through the use of gender stereotypes

• The portrayal of light- and dark-skinned biracial characters

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780078026638
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Higher Education
  • Publication date: 10/1/2011
  • Edition number: 5
  • Pages: 496
  • Sales rank: 112,616
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface xi

Introduction Rethinking the Color Line: Understanding How Boundaries Shift 1

Part I Sorting by colour: Why We Attach Meaning to Race 5

A Race and Ethnicity: Sociohistoric Constructions 7

1 How Our Skins Got Their Color Marvin Harris 7

2 Drawing the Color Line Howard Zirm 9

3 Racial Formations Michael Omi Howard Winant 17

4 Defining Race and Ethnicity C. Matthew Snipp 22

5 Racialized Social System Approach to Racism Eduardo Bonilla-Silva 32

Seeing the Big Picture: The Social Construction of Race, 1790-2000 38

B Race and Ethnicity: Contemporary Socioeconomic Trends 39

6 Understanding Racial-Ethnic Disparities in Health: Sociological Contributions David R.Williams Michelle Sternthal 39

Seeing the Big Picture: How Race Can Be Hazardous to Your Health 48

7 Transformative Assets, the Racial Wealth Gap, and the American Dream Thomas M. Shapiro 49

Seeing the Big Picture: The Color of Money 52

C Race as Chameleon: How the Idea of Race Changes over Time and Place 53

8 Defining Race: Comparative Perspectives F.James Davis 53

Seeing the Big Picture: What Was Your Race in 1890? 63

9 A Tour of Indian Peoples and Indian Lands David E.Wilkins 63

Seeing the Big Picture: From Riches to the "Res" (Reservation System) 78

10 Asian American Panethnicity: Contemporary National and Transnational Possibilities Yen Le Espiritu 79

Seeing the Big Picture: Panethnic Fortunes: Riches and Rags 86

11 Beyond Black and White: Remaking Race in America Jennifer Lee Frank D. Bean 86

Seeing the Big Picture: Check All That Apply (Finally!): The Institutionalization of Mixed Race Identity 91

D Color-Blind America: Fact, Fantasy, or Our Future? 92

12 Color-Blind Privilege: The Social and Political Functions of Erasing the Color Line in Post-Race America Charles A. Gallagher 92

13 The Ideology of Color Blindness Lani Guinier Gerald Torres 101

Seeing the Big Picture: Color-Blind or Blind to Color? 105

14 The Possibility of a New Racial Hierarchy in the Twenty-First-Century United States Herbert J. Gans 11

Part II Prejudice, Discrimination, and Racism 115

A Understanding Racism 117

15 Race Prejudice as a Sense of Group Position Herbert Blumer 117

Seeing the Big Picture: Racism: Group Position or Individual Belief? 122

16 Race and Gender Discrimination: Contemporary Trends James Sterba 122

17 Discrimination and the American Creed Robert K. Merton 127

18 How Does It Feel to Be a Problem? Being Young and Arab in America Moustafa Bayoumi 134

Seeing the Big Picture: America's New Public Enemy? 138

19 The Possessive Investment in Whiteness: Racialized Social Democracy George Lipsitz 139

Seeing the Big Picture: Race as an Investment 147

20 Laissez-Faire Racism, Racial Inequality, and die Role of the Social Sciences Lawrence D. Bobo 148

B How Space Gets Raced 158

21 Residential Segregation and Neighborhood Conditions in U.S. Metropolitan Areas Douglas S. Massey 158

Seeing the Big Picture: How Integrated Is Your Neighborhood? 175

22 The Code of the Streets Elijah Anderson 116

23 Environmental Justice in the 21st Century: Race Still Matters Robert D. Billiard 184

24 Race, Religion, and the Color Line (Or Is That the Color Wall?) Michael O. Emerson 195

25 Why Are There No Supermarkets in My Neighborhood? The Long Search for Fresh Fruit, Produce, and Healthy Food Shannon N. Zenk (et al.) 204

Seeing the Big Picture: Urban Food Deserts: Race, Health, and the Lack of "Real" Food 208

Part III Racialized Opportunity in Social Institutions 209

A Race and Criminal Justice: Oxymoron or an American Tragedy? 211

26 No Equal Justice: The Color of Punishment David Cole 211

Seeing the Big Picture: How Race Tips the Scales of Justice 217

27 The New Jim Crow Michelle Alexander 217

28 Racialized Mass Incarceration: Rounding Up the Usual Suspects Lawrence D. Bobo Victor Thompson 225

Seeing the Big Picture: The Color of Incarceration Rates 230

29 The Mark of a Criminal Record Devah Pager 230

Seeing the Big Picture: The Link between Race, Education, Employment, and Crime 234

30 Using DNA for Justice: Color-blind or Biased? Sheldon Krimsky Tarda Simoncelli 234

B How Race Shapes the Workplace 240

31 Kristen v. Aisha; Brad v. Rasheed: What's in a Name and How It Affects Getting a Job Amy Braverman 240

32 When the Melting Pot Boils Over: The Irish, Jews, Blacks, and Koreans of New York Roger Waldinger 241

Seeing the Big Picture: Who's Got the "Good" Jobs and Why 249

33 "There's No Shame in My Game": Status and Stigma among Harlem's Working Poor Katherine S. Newman Catherine Ellis 249

34 Sweatshops in Sunset Park: A Variation of the Late-Twentieth-Century Chinese Garment Shops in New York City Xiaolan Bao 261

35 Hispanics in the American South and the Transformation of the Poultry Industry William Kandel Emilio A. Parrado 275

Seeing the Big Picture: How Is Upward Mobility Linked to Education, Occupation, and Immigration? 284

C Race, Representations, and the Media 285

36 Racism and Popular Culture Danielle Dirks Jennifer Mueller 285

37 The Media as a System of Racialization: Exploring Images of African American Women and the New Racism Marci Bounds Littlejield 295

38 Black and White in Movies: Portrayals of Black-White Biracial Characters in Movies Alicia Edison George Yancey 301

Seeing the Big Picture: How the Media Shapes Perceptions of Race and Occupations 303

D Crazy Horse Malt Liquor and Athletes: The Tenacity of Stereotypes 304

39 Winnebagos, Cherokees, Apaches, and Dakotas: The Persistence of Stereotyping of American Indians in American Advertising and Brands Debra Merskin 304

Seeing the Big Picture: The Tomahawk Chop: Racism in Image and Action 310

40 Sport in America: The New Racial Stereotypes Richard E. Lapchick 311

Seeing the Big Picture: Television's Interracial Images: Some Fact, Mostly Fiction 318

Part IV How America's Complexion Changes 319

A Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration 321

41 The Melting Pot and the Color Line Stephen Steinberg 321

Seeing the Big Picture: Who Is Allowed to "Melt" in the Pot? Who Wants To? 326

42 Who Are the Other African Americans? Contemporary African and Caribbean Immigrants in the United States John R. Logan 327

43 The Arab Immigrant Experience Michael W.Suleiman 337

44 Ethnic and Racial Identities of Second-Generation Black Immigrants in New York City Mary C. Waters 349

Seeing the Big Picture: Is a Nonethnic Racial Identity Possible? 360

B Race and Romance: Blurring Boundaries 361

45 Guess Who's Been Coming to Dinner? Trends in Interracial Marriage over the 20th Century Roland G. Fryer Jr. 361

46 Captain Kirk Kisses Lieutenant Uhura: Interracial Intimacies—The View from Hollywood Randall L. Kennedy 368

Seeing the Big Picture: Love May Be Blind, but It's Not Color-Blind 373

47 Discovering Racial Borders Heather M. Dalmage 374

48 Redrawing the Color Line? The Problems and Possibilities of Multiracial Families and Group Making Kimberly McClain DaCosta 383

Seeing the Big Picture: Interracial Marriage and the Blurring of the Color Line 392

C Living with Less Racism: Strategies for Individual Action 393

49 Policy Steps toward Closing the Gap Meizhu Lui Bárbara J. Robles Betsy Leondar-Wright Rose M. Brewer Rebecca Adamson 393

50 Ten Things You Can Do to Improve Race Relations Charles A. Gallagher 400

Appendix: Race by the Numbers:America's Racial Report Card 403

Notes and References 423

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