Rethinking the Color Line: Readings in Race and Ethnicity / Edition 3

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Overview

Rethinking the Color Line is an anthology of current research and writings that examine contemporary issues and explore new approaches to the study of race and ethnicity.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A collection for an undergraduate course, providing a theoretical framework and analytical tools and discussing the meaning of race and ethnicity as a social construction. The readings are designed to require students to negotiate between individual agency and the constraints of social structure, and to think of race and ethnicity in fluid rather than static terms. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780073135748
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Companies, The
  • Publication date: 3/24/2006
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 640
  • Product dimensions: 8.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.94 (d)

Table of Contents

Table of Contents
About the Author
Preface
Introduction: Rethinking the Color Line: Understanding How Boundaries Shift
Part I:
Sorting By Color: Why We Attach Meaning To Race

Race and Ethnicity: Sociohistoric Constructions and …

1. How Our Skins Got Their Color

Marvin Harris

2. Drawing the Color Line

Howard Zinn

3. Racial Formations

Michael Omi and Howard Winant

4. Theoretical Perspectives in Race and Ethnic Relations

Joe R. Feagin and Clairece Booher Feagin

5. Racialized Social Systems: Understanding Racism

Eduardo Bonilla

Seeing the Big Picture: The Social Construction of Race 1790-2000

…Contemporary Socioeconomic Trends

6. An Overview of Trends in Social and Economic Well-Being, by Race

Rebecca M. Blank

Seeing the Big Picture: The Role of Race in Social Mobility

7. The Color of Health in the United States

David R. Williams and Chiquita Collins

Seeing the Big Picture: How Race Can Be Hazardous to Your Health

8. Transformative Assets, The Racial Wealth Gap and the American Dream

Tom ShapiroSeeing the Big Picture: The Color of Money

Race as Chameleon: How the Idea of Race Changes Over Time and Place

9. Defining Race: Comparative Perspectives

F. James Davis

Seeing the Big Picture: What was YOUR race in 1890?

10. A Tour of Indian People and Indian Lands

David E. Wilkins

Seeing the Big Picture: From Riches to the “Res” (Reservation System)

11. Asian American Panethnicity: Contemporary National and Transnational Possibilities

Yen Le Espiritu

Seeing the Big Picture: Panethnic Riches, Panethnic Poverty

12. Beyond Black and White: Remaking Race in America

Jennifer Lee and Frank Bean

Seeing the Big Picture: Check All That Apply (Finally!): The Institutionalization of Mixed Race Identity

Colorblind America: Fact, Fantasy or Our Future?

13. Color Blind Privilege: The Social and Political Functions of Erasing the Color Line in Post Race America

Charles A. Gallagher

14. The Ideology of Colorblindness

Lani Guinier and Gerald Torres

15. The Possibility of a New Racial Hierarchy in the Twenty-First-Century United States

Herbert Gans

Seeing the Big Picture: Colorblind or Blind to Color?
Part II
Prejudice, Discrimination, and Racism

Understanding Racism

16. Race Prejudice as a Sense of Group Position

Herbert Blumer

Seeing the Big Picture: Racism: Group Position or Individual Belief?

17. Discrimination and the American Creed

Robert Merton

18. Race and Civil Rights Pre-September 11, 2001: The Targeting of Arabs and Muslims

Susan M. Akram and Kevin R. Johnson

Seeing the Big Picture: America’s New Public Enemy?

19. The Possessive Investment in Whiteness

George Lipsitz

Seeing the Big Picture: Race As an Investment

20. Laissez-Fair Racism, Racial Inequality and the Role of the Social Sciences

Lawrence D. Bobo

How Space Gets Raced

21. Residential Segregation and Neighborhood Conditions in U.S. Metropolitan Areas

Douglas S. Massey

Seeing the Big Picture: How Integrated is Your Neighborhood?

22. The Code of the Streets

Elijah Anderson

23. Environmental Justice in the 21st Century: Race Still Matters

Robert D. Bullard

24. Race, Religion, and the Color Line (or is that the Color Wall?)

Michael Emerson

25. Why Are There No Supermarkets in my Neighborhood: The Long Search for Fresh Fruit, Produce and Inexpensive Healthy Food

Shannon Zenk (et.al)

Seeing the Big Picture: Urban Food Deserts: Race, Health and the Lack of “Real” Food
Part III
Racialized Opportunity in Social Institutions

Race and Criminal Justice: Oxymoron or an American Tragedy

26. No Equal Justice: The Color of Punishment

David Cole

Seeing the Big Picture: How Race Tips the Scales of Justice

27. Everyday Racism on the Police Force

Kenneth Bolton Jr. and Joe R. Feagin

28. .…and the Poor Get Prison

Jeffrey Reiman

29. The Mark of a Criminal Record

Devah Pager

Seeing the Big Picture: The Link Between Race, Education, Employment and Crime

How Race Shapes the Workplace

30. Kristin v. Aisha; Brad v. Rasheed: What’s in a Name and How it Effects Getting a Job

Amy Braverman

31. When the Pot Boils Over; The Irish, Jews, Blacks and Koreans of New York

Roger Waldinger

Seeing the Big Picture: Whose Got the “Good” Jobs and Why.

32. “There’s No Shame in My Game”: Status and Stigma Among Harlem’s Working Poor

Katherine S. Newman and Catherine Ellis

33. Sweatshops in Sunset Park: A Variation of Late Twentieth-Century Chinese Garment Shops in New York City

Xiaolan Bao

34. Hispanics in the American South and the Transformation of the Poultry Industry

William Kandel and Emilio A. Parrado

Seeing the Big Picture: How Do Segregated Newsrooms Create Biased News?

Race, Representations and the Media

Drug Dealers, Maids and Mammies: The Role of Stereotypes in the Media

35. Broadcast News Portrayal of Minorities: Accuracy in Reporting

Roger D. Klein and Stacy Naccarato

Seeing the Big Picture: How the Media Shapes Race Relations.

36. Television and the Politics of Representation

Justin Lewis and Sut Jhally

37. Distorted Reality: Hispanic Characters in TV Entertainment

S. Robert Lichter and Daniel R. Amundson

Crazy Horse Malt Liquor and Athletes: The Tenacity of Stereotypes

38. Winnebagos, Cherokees, Apaches and Dakotas: The Persistence of Stereotyping of American Indians in American Advertising

Debra Merskin

Seeing the Big Picture: The Tomahawk Chop: Racism in Image and Action

39. Sport in America: The New Racial Stereotypes

Richard E. Lapchick

Seeing the Big Picture: Television’s Interracial Images: Some Fact, Mostly Fiction
Part IV
How America’s Complexion Changes

Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration

40. The Melting Pot and the Color Line

Steven Steinberg

Seeing the Big Picture: Who is Allowed to “Melt” in the Pot? Who Wants to?

41. Who are the Other African Americans? Contemporary African and Caribbean Immigrants in the United States

John R. Logan

42. The Arab Immigrant Experience

Michael W. Suleiman

43. Ethnic and Racial Identities of Second-Generation Black Immigrants in New York City

Mary C. Waters

Seeing the Big Picture: Is a Non-ethnic Racial Identity Possible?

Race and Romance: Blurring Boundaries

44. Guess Who’s Been Coming to Dinner? Trends in Interracial Marriage over the 20th Century

Roland G. Fryer Jr.

45. Captain Kirk Kisses Lieutenant Uhura: Interracial Intimacies From Hollywood

Randall Kennedy

Seeing the Big Picture: Love May be Blind, But It’s Not Colorblind

46. Discovering Racial Borders

Heather Dalmage

47. Redrawing the Color-Line? : The Problems and Possibilities of Multiracial Families and Group Making

Kimberly McClain DaCosta

Seeing the Big Picture: Interracial Marriage and the Blurring of the Color Line

Living With Less Racism: Strategies for Individual Action

48. Closing the Racial Inequality Gap: A Plan For Action

Meizhu Lui, Barbara J. Robles, Betsy Leondar-Wright, Rose M. Brewer, and

Rebecca Adamson

49. Ten Things You Can Do To Improve Race Relations

Charles A. Gallagher
Appendix:
Race by the Numbers—America’s Racial Report Card
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