Retracing the Past: Readings in the History of the American People, Volume I (To 1877) / Edition 6

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Overview

Retracing the Past is an engaging collection of both primary and secondary sources that emphasizes social history and cultural diversity.

The anthology leads students to consider the role of women, ethnic/racial groups, and laboring Americans in weaving the nation's social fabric, and allows them to explore life at the individual and community level. It also introduces students to individuals and groups who made a critical difference in shaping American history. This edition extends its reach to cover the question of diversity more fully, incorporating it into the political and social history of the United States.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780321333797
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 7/19/2005
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 6
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Table of Contents

*Asterisks indicate new readings.

Preface.

Acknowledgments.

Introduction: Sources and Interpretations.

Part I.

1. Fr. Paul le Juene, “Brief Relation of the Journey to New France (1633)/ Jesuit Observations on the “Enslavement” of Women (1710).Reading: James Axtell, “Imagining the Other: First Encounters.”

Glossary.

Implications.

2. Richard Frethorn’s Letter Home (1623).

*Reading: T. H. Breen/Stephen Innes, “Anthony Johnson: Patriarch on Pungoteague Creek.”

Glossary.

Implications.

3. John Winthrop, “A Model of Christian Charity” (1630).

Reading: Virginia DeJohn Anderson, Migrants and Motives: Religion and the Settlement of New England,1630-1640.

Glossary.

Implications.

4. The Stranger on Slave Recreation (1772).

Reading: Peter H. Wood, Patterns of Slave Resistance.

Glossary.

Implications.

5. Anne Bradstreet, Thoughts on Her Husband and Children (1650).

Reading: Mary Beth Norton, A Small Circle of Domestic Concerns.

Glossary.

Implications.

6. Jonathan Edwards, Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God (1741).

*Reading: Harry S. Stout, “American Awakener.”

Glossary.

Implications.

Part II.

1. John Andrews to William Barrell on the Boston Tea Party (1773).

Reading: Alfred F. Young, George Robert Twelves Hewes: The Revolution and the Rise of Popular Politics.

Glossary.

Implications.

2. Anon., “A Brief Narrative of the Ravages of the British and Hessians at Princeton (1777).

Reading: James Kirby Martin, A ‘Most Undisciplined, Profligate Crew: Protest and Defiance in the Continental Ranks.

Glossary.

Implications.

3. Judith Sargent Murray, On the Equality of the Sexes (1790).

Reading: Carol Berkin, Women in the American Revolution.

Glossary.

Implications.

4. Brutus, Second Essay Opposing the Constitution (1787).

Reading: Robert E. Shalhope, The Constitution and the Competing Political Cultures of late-Eighteenth-Century America.

Glossary.

Implications.

5. Benjamin Banneker to Thomas Jefferson on the African American Intellect (1791).

*Reading: Gary B. Nash, Thomas Peters: Millwright and Deliverer.

Glossary.

Implications.

6. Little Turtle on the Treaty of Greenville (1795)/Tecumseh on Land Cessions (1810).

*Reading: Colin G. Calloway, “The Revolution in Indian Country."

Glossary.

Implications.

Part III.

1. Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur, The American Belisarius (c. 1790s).

Reading: Robert A. Gross, Culture and Cultivation: Agriculture and Society in Thoreau’s Concord.

Glossary.

Implications.

2. Resolutions of the Journeymen Carpenters/Resolutions of the Master Carpenters (1845).

Reading: Ronald Schultz, God and Workingmen: Popular Religion and the Formation of Philadelphia’s Working Class, 1790-1830.

Glossary.

Implications.

3. Lucy Larcom, “An Idyll of Work.”

Reading: Christine Stansell, Women, Children, and the Uses of the Street: Class and Gender Conflict in New York City.

Glossary.

Implications.

4. The Stuart-Bennett Duel (1819).

Reading: Elliott J. Gorn, “Gouge and Bite, Pull Hair and Scratch”: The Social Significance of Fighting in the Southern Backcountry.

Glossary.

Implications.

5. *William Swain’s Letter from the California Gold Fields (1850).

*Reading: Malcolm Rohrbough, “No Boy’s Play: Migration and Settlement in Gold Rush California.”

Glossary.

Implications.

6. Susie King Taylor, Reminiscences of an Army Laundress (1902).

*Reading: Drew Gilpin Faust, “Husbands and Wives: Southern Marriages in the Civil War.”

Glossary.

Implications.

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