Retracing the Past: Readings in the History of the American People, Volume II (Since 1865) / Edition 6

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Overview

Retracing the Past is an engaging collection of both primary and secondary sources that emphasizes social history and cultural diversity.

The anthology leads students to consider the role of women, ethnic/racial groups, and laboring Americans in weaving the nation's social fabric, and allows them to explore life at the individual and community level. It also introduces students to individuals and groups who made a critical difference in shaping American history. This edition extends its reach to cover the question of diversity more fully, incorporating it into the political and social history of the United States.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780321333803
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 7/15/2005
  • Series: Retracing the Past Ser.
  • Edition description: 6TH
  • Edition number: 6
  • Pages: 240
  • Product dimensions: 7.48 (w) x 9.13 (h) x 0.94 (d)

Table of Contents

*Asterisks indicate new readings.

Preface.

Acknowledgments.

Introduction: Sources and Interpretations.

Part I.

1. Jourdon Anderson, “To My Old Master…” (1865).

Reading: Eric Foner, African Americans in Public Office During the Era of Reconstruction.

Glossary.

Implications.

2. Lee Chew, Life of a Chinese Immigrant (1903).

Reading: Jack Chen, The Chinese Link an Continent and a Nation.

Glossary.

Implications.

3. The Omaha Platform of the People’s Party (1892).

Reading: Bruce Palmer, The Southern Populist Critique of American Capitalism.

Glossary.

Implications.

4. *Rose Gollop Cohen: A Young Immigrant in New York City (1918).

*Reading: Elizabeth Ewen, “First Encounters: Immigrant Women in the City.”

Glossary.

Implications.

5. *Richard K. Fox, Coney Island Frolics (1883).

*Reading: David Nasaw, “Talking and Singing Machines, Parlors, and Peep Shows: Popular Amusements in Turn-of-the-Century America.”

Glossary.

Implications.

6. Red Cloud (1890) and Flying Hawk (1936) on Wounded Knee .

Reading: Laura Jane Moore, Lozen: An Apache Woman Warrior.

Glossary.

Implications.

Part II.

1. James T. Rapier, The Agricultural Labor Force in the South (1880).

Reading: Jacqueline Jones, A Bridge of Bent Backs and Laboring Muscles: The Rural South, 1880-1915.

Glossary.

Implications.

2. John Muir, Mount Ritter (1911).

Reading: Peter Wild, John Muir: The Mysteries of Mountains.

Glossary.

Implications.

3. *The Chinese Exclusion Act (1882).

*Reading: Judy Yung, “Unbound Feet: Chinese Immigrant Women in Early Twentieth-Century San Francisco.”

Glossary.

Implications.

4. Advertisements (1925/1927).

Reading: Mary Murphy, Messenger of the New Age: Station KGIR in Butte.

Glossary.

Implications.

5. Meridel LeSueur, “The Despair of Unemployed Women” (1932).

Reading: Edward R. Ellis, What the Depression Did to People.

Glossary.

Implications.

6. *Benny Goodman, “Explaining Swing” (1939).

*Reading: Lewis A. Erenberg, “The Crowd Goes Wild: The Youth Culture of Swing.”

Glossary.

Implications.

Part III.

1. Students for a Democratic Society, Port Huron Statement (1962).

*Reading: Maurice Isserman/Michael Kazin, “The Making of the 1960s Youth Culture.”

Glossary.

Implications.

2. *Enriqueta Longeaux y Vásquez, A Chicana Critique of the Chicano Movement (1969).

*Reading: Vicki Ruiz, “Claiming Public Space: Mexican Women in Twentieth-Century America.”

Glossary.

Implications.

3. Res trictions at Levittown (Late 1940s).

Reading: Kenneth T. Jackson, The Drive-In Culture of Contemporary America.

Glossary.

Implications.

4. Lyndon B. Johnson, Commencement Address at Howard University (1965).

Reading: Allan J. Matusow, The Vietnam War, the Liberals, and the Overthrow of LBJ.

Glossary.

Implications.

5. Ione Malloy, Southie Won’t Go (1975).

Reading: Robin D. G. Kelley, After Civil Rights: The African American Working and Middle Classes.

Glossary.

Implications.

6. Patricia Morrisroe, Yuppies–the New Class (1985).

Reading: Juliet B. Schor, The Insidious Cycle of Work and Spend.

Glossary.

Implications.

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