The Return of Sherlock Holmes

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Overview

The Return of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of 13 Sherlock Holmes stories, originally published in 1903-1904, by Arthur Conan Doyle. It was the third collection of Holmes 'adventures' following the successes of The Adventures of ...
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Overview

The Return of Sherlock Holmes is a collection of 13 Sherlock Holmes stories, originally published in 1903-1904, by Arthur Conan Doyle. It was the third collection of Holmes 'adventures' following the successes of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes and The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes.

The 13 Sherlock Holmes mysteries in this collection:

THE ADVENTURE OF THE EMPTY HOUSE

THE ADVENTURE OF THE NORWOOD BUILDER

THE ADVENTURE OF THE DANCING MEN

THE ADVENTURE OF THE SOLITARY CYCLIST

THE ADVENTURE OF THE PRIORY SCHOOL

THE ADVENTURE OF BLACK PETER

THE ADVENTURE OF CHARLES AUGUSTUS
MILVERTON

THE ADVENTURE OF THE SIX NAPOLEONS

THE ADVENTURE OF THE THREE STUDENTS

THE ADVENTURE OF THE GOLDEN PINCE-NEZ

THE ADVENTURE OF THE MISSING THREE-QUARTER

THE ADVENTURE OF THE ABBEY GRANGE

THE ADVENTURE OF THE SECOND STAIN

In one of his novels, author Doyle distressed readers by allowing both Sherlock Holmes and his adversary Professor Moriarty to die. Then in 1903, to please readers, he resuscitates the famous sleuth. The stories in this collection tell of his return.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781500721084
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
  • Publication date: 8/2/2014
  • Pages: 440
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.89 (d)

Meet the Author

The life of Arthur Conan Doyle illustrates the excitement and diversity of the Victorian age unlike that of any other single figure of the period. At different points in his life he was a surgeon on a whaling ship; a GP; an apprentice eye-surgeon; an unsuccessful parliamentary candidate (twice); a multi-talented sportsman; one of the inventors of cross-country skiing in Switzerland; a formidable public speaker; a campaigner against miscarriages of justice; a military strategist; a writer in a range of forms; and the head of an extraordinary family. In his autobiography, he wrote: 'I have had a life which, for variety and romance, could, I think, hardly be exceeded.' He was not wrong. But Conan Doyle was also a Victorian with a twist, a man of tensions and contradictions. He was fascinated by travel, exploration, and invention, indeed all things modern and technological; yet at the same time he was also very traditional, voicing support for values such as chivalry, duty, constancy, and honour. By the time of his death in July 1930 he was a celebrity, achieving worldwide fame and notoriety for his creation of the rationalist, scientific super-detective Sherlock Holmes; yet at the same time his later decades were taken up with his advocacy of the new religion of Spiritualism, in which he was a devoted believer.

Biography

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was born in Edinburgh in 1859. After nine years in Jesuit schools, he went to Edinburgh University, receiving a degree in medicine in 1881. He then became an eye specialist in Southsea, with a distressing lack of success. Hoping to augment his income, he wrote his first story, A Study in Scarlet. His detective, Sherlock Holmes, was modeled in part after Dr. Joseph Bell of the Edinburgh Infirmary, a man with spectacular powers of observation, analysis, and inference. Conan Doyle may have been influenced also by his admiration for the neat plots of Gaboriau and for Poe's detective, M. Dupin. After several rejections, the story was sold to a British publisher for £25, and thus was born the world's best-known and most-loved fictional detective. Fifty-nine more Sherlock Holmes adventures followed.

Once, wearying of Holmes, his creator killed him off, but was forced by popular demand to resurrect him. Sir Arthur -- he had been knighted for this defense of the British cause in his The Great Boer War -- became an ardent Spiritualist after the death of his son Kingsley, who had been wounded at the Somme in World War I. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle died in Sussex in 1930.

Author biography courtesy of Penguin Group (USA).

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    1. Also Known As:
      Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
    1. Date of Birth:
      May 22, 1859
    2. Place of Birth:
      Edinburgh, Scotland
    1. Date of Death:
      July 7, 1930
    2. Place of Death:
      Crowborough, Sussex, England

Read an Excerpt

The Return of Sherlock Holmes


By ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE, JANET BAINE KOPITO

Dover Publications, Inc.

Copyright © 2010 Dover Publications, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-486-11538-2



CHAPTER 1

THE ADVENTURE OF THE EMPTY HOUSE

IT WAS IN the spring of the year 1894 that all London was interested, and the fashionable world dismayed, by the murder of the Honourable Ronald Adair under most unusual and inexplicable circumstances. The public has already learned those particulars of the crime which came out in the police investigation; but a good deal was suppressed upon that occasion, since the case for the prosecution was so overwhelmingly strong that it was not necessary to bring forward all the facts. Only now, at the end of nearly ten years, am I allowed to supply those missing links which make up the whole of that remarkable chain. The crime was of interest in itself, but that interest was as nothing to me compared to the inconceivable sequel, which afforded me the greatest shock and surprise of any event in my adventurous life. Even now, after this long interval, I find myself thrilling as I think of it, and feeling once more that sudden flood of joy, amazement, and incredulity which utterly submerged my mind. Let me say to that public which has shown some interest in those glimpses which I have occasionally given them of the thoughts and actions of a very remarkable man that they are not to blame me if I have not shared my knowledge with them, for I should have considered it my first duty to have done so had I not been barred by a positive prohibition from his own lips, which was only withdrawn upon the third of last month.

It can be imagined that my close intimacy with Sherlock Holmes had interested me deeply in crime, and that after his disappearance I never failed to read with care the various problems which came before the public, and I even attempted more than once for my own private satisfaction to employ his methods in their solution, though with indifferent success. There was none, however, which appealed to me like this tragedy of Ronald Adair. As I read the evidence at the inquest, which led up to a verdict of wilful murder against some person or persons unknown, I realized more clearly than I had ever done the loss which the community had sustained by the death of Sherlock Holmes. There were points about this strange business which would, I was sure, have specially appealed to him, and the efforts of the police would have been supplemented, or more probably anticipated, by the trained observation and the alert mind of the first criminal agent in Europe. All day as I drove upon my round I turned over the case in my mind, and found no explanation which appeared to me to be adequate. At the risk of telling a twice-told tale I will recapitulate the facts as they were known to the public at the conclusion of the inquest.

The Honourable Ronald Adair was the second son of the Earl of Maynooth, at that time Governor of one of the Australian Colonies. Adair's mother had returned from Australia to undergo the operation for cataract, and she, her son Ronald, and her daughter Hilda were living together at 427, Park Lane. The youth moved in the best society, had, so far as was known, no enemies, and no particular vices. He had been engaged to Miss Edith Woodley, of Carstairs, but the engagement had been broken off by mutual consent some months before, and there was no sign that it had left any very profound feeling behind it. For the rest the man's life moved in a narrow and conventional circle, for his habits were quiet and his nature unemotional. Yet it was upon this easy-going young aristocrat that death came in most strange and unexpected form between the hours of ten and eleven- twenty on the night of March 30th, 1894.

Ronald Adair was fond of cards, playing continually, but never for such stakes as would hurt him. He was a member of the Baldwin, the Cavendish, and the Bagatelle card clubs. It was shown that after dinner on the day of his death he had played a rubber of whist at the latter club. He had also played there in the afternoon. The evidence of those who had played with him—Mr. Murray, Sir John Hardy, and Colonel Moran—showed that the game was whist, and that there was a fairly equal fall of the cards. Adair might have lost five pounds, but not more. His fortune was a considerable one, and such a loss could not in any way affect him. He had played nearly every day at one club or other, but he was a cautious player, and usually rose a winner. It came out in evidence that in partnership with Colonel Moran he had actually won as much as four hundred and twenty pounds in a sitting some weeks before from Godfrey Milner and Lord Balmoral. So much for his recent history, as it came out at the inquest.

On the evening of the crime he returned from the club exactly at ten. His mother and sister were out spending the evening with a relation. The servant deposed that she heard him enter the front room on the second floor, generally used as his sitting-room. She had lit a fire there, and as it smoked she had opened the window. No sound was heard from the room until eleven-twenty, the hour of the return of Lady Maynooth and her daughter. Desiring to say good-night, she had attempted to enter her son's room. The door was locked on the inside, and no answer could be got to their cries and knocking. Help was obtained and the door forced. The unfortunate young man was found lying near the table. His head had been horribly mutilated by an expanding revolver bullet, but no weapon of any sort was to be found in the room. On the table lay two bank-notes for ten pounds each and seventeen pounds ten in silver and gold, the money arranged in little piles of varying amount. There were some figures also upon a sheet of paper with the names of some club friends opposite to them, from which it was conjectured that before his death he was endeavouring to make out his losses or winnings at cards.

A minute examination of the circumstances served only to make the case more complex. In the first place, no reason could be given why the young man should have fastened the door upon the inside. There was the possibility that the murderer had done this and had afterwards escaped by the window. The drop was at least twenty feet, however, and a bed of crocuses in full bloom lay beneath. Neither the flowers nor the earth showed any sign of having been disturbed, nor were there any marks upon the narrow strip of grass which separated the house from the road. Apparently, therefore, it was the young man himself who had fastened the door. But how did he come by his death? No one could have climbed up to the window without leaving traces. Suppose a man had fired through the window, it would indeed be a remarkable shot who could with a revolver inflict so deadly a wound. Again, Park Lane is a frequented thoroughfare, and there is a cab-stand within a hundred yards of the house. No one had heard a shot. And yet there was the dead man, and there the revolver bullet, which had mushroomed out, as soft-nosed bullets will, and so inflicted a wound which must have caused instantaneous death. Such were the circumstances of the Park Lane Mystery, which were further complicated by entire absence of motive, since, as I have said, young Adair was not known to have any enemy, and no attempt had been made to remove the money or valuables in the room.

All day I turned these facts over in my mind, endeavouring to hit upon some theory which could reconcile them all, and to find that line of least resistance which my poor friend had declared to be the starting-point of every investigation. I confess that I made little progress. In the evening I strolled across the Park, and found myself about six o'clock at the Oxford Street end of Park Lane. A group of loafers upon the pavements, all staring up at a particular window, directed me to the house which I had come to see. A tall, thin man with coloured glasses, whom I strongly suspected of being a plain-clothes detective, was pointing out some theory of his own, while the others crowded round to listen to what he said. I got as near him as I could, but his observations seemed to me to be absurd, so I withdrew again in some disgust. As I did so I struck against an elderly deformed man, who had been behind me, and I knocked down several books which he was carrying. I remember that as I picked them up I observed the title of one of them, "The Origin of Tree Worship," and it struck me that the fellow must be some poor bibliophile who, either as a trade or as a hobby, was a collector of obscure volumes. I endeavoured to apologize for the accident, but it was evident that these books which I had so unfortunately maltreated were very precious objects in the eyes of their owner. With a snarl of contempt he turned upon his heel, and I saw his curved back and white side-whiskers disappear among the throng.

My observations of No. 427, Park Lane, did little to clear up the problem in which I was interested. The house was separated from the street by a low wall and railing, the whole not more than five feet high. It was perfectly easy, therefore, for anyone to get into the garden, but the window was entirely inaccessible, since there was no water-pipe or anything which could help the most active man to climb it. More puzzled than ever I retraced my steps to Kensington. I had not been in my study five minutes when the maid entered to say that a person desired to see me. To my astonishment it was none other than my strange old book-collector, his sharp, wizened face peering out from a frame of white hair, and his precious volumes, a dozen of them at least, wedged under his right arm.

"You're surprised to see me, sir," said he, in a strange, croaking voice.

I acknowledged that I was.

"Well, I've a conscience, sir, and when I chanced to see you go into this house, as I came hobbling after you, I thought to myself, I'll just step in and see that kind gentleman, and tell him that if I was a bit gruff in my manner there was not any harm meant, and that I am much obliged to him for picking up my books."

"You make too much of a trifle," said I. "May I ask how you knew who I was?"

"Well, sir, if it isn't too great a liberty, I am a neighbour of yours, for you'll find my little bookshop at the corner of Church Street, and very happy to see you, I am sure. Maybe you collect yourself, sir; here's 'British Birds,' and 'Catullus,' and 'The Holy War'—a bargain every one of them. With five volumes you could just fill that gap on that second shelf. It looks untidy, does it not, sir?"

I moved my head to look at the cabinet behind me. When I turned again Sherlock Holmes was standing smiling at me across my study table. I rose to my feet, stared at him for some seconds in utter amazement, and then it appears that I must have fainted for the first and the last time in my life. Certainly a grey mist swirled before my eyes, and when it cleared I found my collar-ends undone and the tingling after-taste of brandy upon my lips. Holmes was bending over my chair, his flask in his hand.

"My dear Watson," said the well-remembered voice, "I owe you a thousand apologies. I had no idea that you would be so affected."

I gripped him by the arm.

"Holmes!" I cried. "Is it really you? Can it indeed be that you are alive? Is it possible that you succeeded in climbing out of that awful abyss?"

"Wait a moment," said he. "Are you sure that you are really fit to discuss things? I have given you a serious shock by my unnecessarily dramatic reappearance."

"I am all right, but indeed, Holmes, I can hardly believe my eyes. Good heavens, to think that you—you of all men—should be standing in my study!" Again I gripped him by the sleeve and felt the thin, sinewy arm beneath it. "Well, you're not a spirit, anyhow," said I. "My dear chap, I am overjoyed to see you. Sit down and tell me how you came alive out of that dreadful chasm."

He sat opposite to me and lit a cigarette in his old nonchalant manner. He was dressed in the seedy frock-coat of the book merchant, but the rest of that individual lay in a pile of white hair and old books upon the table. Holmes looked even thinner and keener than of old, but there was a dead-white tinge in his aquiline face which told me that his life recently had not been a healthy one.

"I am glad to stretch myself, Watson," said he. "It is no joke when a tall man has to take a foot off his stature for several hours on end. Now, my dear fellow, in the matter of these explanations we have, if I may ask for your co-operation, a hard and dangerous night's work in front of us. Perhaps it would be better if I gave you an account of the whole situation when that work is finished."

"I am full of curiosity. I should much prefer to hear now."

"You'll come with me to-night?"

"When you like and where you like."

"This is indeed like the old days. We shall have time for a mouthful of dinner before we need go. Well, then, about that chasm. I had no serious difficulty in getting out of it, for the very simple reason that I never was in it."

"You never were in it?"

"No, Watson, I never was in it. My note to you was absolutely genuine. I had little doubt that I had come to the end of my career when I perceived the somewhat sinister figure of the late Professor Moriarty standing upon the narrow pathway which led to safety. I read an inexorable purpose in his grey eyes. I exchanged some remarks with him, therefore, and obtained his courteous permission to write the short note which you afterwards received. I left it with my cigarette-box and my stick and I walked along the pathway, Moriarty still at my heels. When I reached the end I stood at bay. He drew no weapon, but he rushed at me and threw his long arms around me. He knew that his own game was up, and was only anxious to revenge himself upon me. We tottered together upon the brink of the fall. I have some knowledge, however, of baritsu, or the Japanese system of wrestling, which has more than once been very useful to me. I slipped through his grip, and he with a horrible scream kicked madly for a few seconds and clawed the air with both his hands. But for all his efforts he could not get his balance, and over he went. With my face over the brink I saw him fall for a long way. Then he struck a rock, bounded off, and splashed into the water."

I listened with amazement to this explanation, which Holmes delivered between the puffs of his cigarette.

"But the tracks!" I cried. "I saw with my own eyes that two went down the path and none returned."

"It came about in this way. The instant that the Professor had disappeared it struck me what a really extraordinarily lucky chance Fate had placed in my way. I knew that Moriarty was not the only man who had sworn my death. There were at least three others whose desire for vengeance upon me would only be increased by the death of their leader. They were all most dangerous men. One or other would certainly get me. On the other hand, if all the world was convinced that I was dead they would take liberties, these men, they would lay themselves open, and sooner or later I could destroy them. Then it would be time for me to announce that I was still in the land of the living. So rapidly does the brain act that I believe I had thought this all out before Professor Moriarty had reached the bottom of the Reichenbach Fall.

"I stood up and examined the rocky wall behind me. In your picturesque account of the matter, which I read with great interest some months later, you assert that the wall was sheer. This was not literally true. A few small footholds presented themselves, and there was some indication of a ledge. The cliff is so high that to climb it all was an obvious impossibility, and it was equally impossible to make my way along the wet path without leaving some tracks. I might, it is true, have reversed my boots, as I have done on similar occasions, but the sight of three sets of tracks in one direction would certainly have suggested a deception. On the whole, then, it was best that I should risk the climb. It was not a pleasant business, Watson. The fall roared beneath me. I am not a fanciful person, but I give you my word that I seemed to hear Moriarty's voice screaming at me out of the abyss. A mistake would have been fatal. More than once, as tufts of grass came out in my hand or my foot slipped in the wet notches of the rock, I thought that I was gone. But I struggled upwards, and at last I reached a ledge several feet deep and covered with soft green moss, where I could lie unseen in the most perfect comfort. There I was stretched when you, my dear Watson, and all your following were investigating in the most sympathetic and inefficient manner the circumstances of my death.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from The Return of Sherlock Holmes by ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE, JANET BAINE KOPITO. Copyright © 2010 Dover Publications, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of Dover Publications, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Contents

Title Page,
Copyright Page,
Note,
THE ADVENTURE OF THE EMPTY HOUSE,
THE ADVENTURE OF THE NORWOOD BUILDER,
THE ADVENTURE OF THE DANCING MEN,
THE ADVENTURE OF THE SOLITARY CYCLIST,
THE ADVENTURE OF THE PRIORY SCHOOL,
THE ADVENTURE OF BLACK PETER,
THE ADVENTURE OF CHARLES AUGUSTUS MILVERTON,
THE ADVENTURE OF THE SIX NAPOLEONS,
THE ADVENTURE OF THE THREE STUDENTS,
THE ADVENTURE OF THE GOLDEN PINCE-NEZ,
THE ADVENTURE OF THE MISSING THREE-QUARTER,
THE ADVENTURE OF THE ABBEY GRANGE,
THE ADVENTURE OF THE SECOND STAIN,

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 68 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(27)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(9)

1 Star

(19)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 68 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2010

    very poor formating

    The conversion to ebook was very poorly done. The text is nearly unreadable with multiple errors in each sentence. Download from Project Gutenberg and download it there. Their version is much cleaner.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2011

    Unreadable. :( Why offer it????

    So scrambled that one can't read it. I know it was free, but what is the point???

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2011

    Not readable

    Virtually unreadable due to all the errors.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2012

    An excellent collection of Holmes tales. This has some of my fav

    An excellent collection of Holmes tales. This has some of my favorites. By the way, this version is very nice and isn't full of errors, as some of the other reviews seem to be for other versions, not this one

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 25, 2011

    Okay....

    Very poor formatting and many, many errors made the story hard to understand. But, hey, what else can you expect from a free download? I would recommed buying one of the .99 cent versions, that way you dont have to deal with those pesky errors.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 4, 2011

    The Return of Sherlock Holmes

    Another fabulous novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Same characters, great new mysteries. Brilliant!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 6, 2011

    Horrible Digitalization

    This translation of Sherlock Holmes has passages that are virtualy unreadable. The first chapter or two are all right but after that certain passages get completely replaced by symbols. I suggest you buy one of the other copys of this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 21, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    AN IMMENSELY TALENTED NARRATOR

    A previous collection of Doyle's stories, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, brought so much pleasure that I couldn't wait for more. Here they are in THE RETURN OF SHERLOCK HOLMES stunningly presented by Simon Prebble.. If you've not yet heard a reading by Prebble, sit down and prepare to be well entertained.

    The British born Prebble, an experienced stage, television, and film, actor came to our country in 1990. Since then he has narrated some 350 audio books and has garnered every possible award (some numerous times) - A Golden Voice and Voices of the Century by AudioFile, 24 Earphone awards, 5 Listen Up awards...well, you get the idea, he's terrific.

    This collection of 13 Holmes stories was initially published during the years 1903 - 1904. It is the first collection to appear since Holmes supposedly died in "The Adventure of the Final Problem," and represents Doyle at his best. Among the 13 we find everything from The Adventure of the Empty House (which features the return of Holmes and his explanation of miraculously surviving a to the death struggle with Professor Moriarity) to The Adventure of the Second Stain.

    The redoubtable Watson is, of course, by Holmes's side throughout offering his memorable comments and questions.

    THE RETURN OF SHERLOCK HOLMES is truly a classic and one that detective fiction aficionados will want to hear again and again.

    - Gail Cooke

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 6, 2014

    Love it!!!!!!!

    I am a bi fan of sherlock and wasvery disapoited by the end of tye final problem

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 30, 2013

    Garbage

    Total ripoff, almost unreadable. Find another version.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2013

    Great story, not so great copy

    Hey the missprints aren't that bad! I mean, you can still read it! And it's

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2012

    Gobbledygook

    Lots of characters in place of the simply marvelous words that shoul be there.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2012

    horriby in need of a proof reader. So sad as it is a good story

    Great story but should be read on the printed page

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2012

    Jumbled words

    Made reading very difficult.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2012

    Ok

    It's ok pretty interesting but can be a bit odd.

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  • Posted January 26, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Review

    A welcome return for the legendary Sherlock Holmes.

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  • Posted September 5, 2011

    Horrible

    Horrible

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 18, 2011

    Bad overview

    Sorry, folks, I want to read the overview of the book, not you the publisher. I want to know what it is I am buying. I will not buy this book because of that

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 18, 2011

    few weird symbols, but on the whole a ledible copy of a good book

    excellant story with only afew passages of illegible symbols and figures.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2006

    Yet more detective stories from the master

    Yet more excellent detective stories from the master. I'm not sure why, but Sherlock Holmes stories never seem to get old. They are just really fun. This book is another collection of short stories, including a baker's dozen of adventures. This is generally the same stuff as the other short story collections, so if you have read the others you will know if this interests you or not. Some of the stories do take a slightly different direction than in the other books. Specifically, sometimes Holmes doesn't exactly solve the crime in the way the client wants, and in one instance the client doesn't even ever get to know what really happened. This is slightly odd, but considering the need to vary things up, it worked out rather well. This book does include the first story where I was able to figure out what was going on before Sherlock Holmes explained it. So, I feel a little proud of that. Another fine addition to the collection.

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