Return of the Dittos

( 5 )

Overview

The author of "Moe Howard Died For Our Sins" is back with a new collection of short stories that again shows why reviewers have called him "devious" and "a natural born storyteller." "Return of the Dittos" takes readers on another wild romp. Whether depicting a bagboy revolt or the impending end of the world, these 20 tales are sometimes weird, occasionally outrageous but always thoroughly entertaining. This collection will engage you - and your imagination - from its first page...
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Overview

The author of "Moe Howard Died For Our Sins" is back with a new collection of short stories that again shows why reviewers have called him "devious" and "a natural born storyteller." "Return of the Dittos" takes readers on another wild romp. Whether depicting a bagboy revolt or the impending end of the world, these 20 tales are sometimes weird, occasionally outrageous but always thoroughly entertaining. This collection will engage you - and your imagination - from its first page to its last.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781439227329
  • Publisher: BookSurge, LLC
  • Publication date: 4/25/2009
  • Pages: 182
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.39 (d)

Meet the Author

Dale Andrew White's short fiction has appeared in Modern Short Stories, Comic Relief, Beyond Science Fiction & Fantasy, Nuthouse, The Macguffin, Northcoast View and numerous other magazines and journals. His work includes the short story collection, "Moe Howard Died For Our Sins" and the interview collection "Encounters with Authors."
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 5 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 11, 2012

    Return of the Dittos and other stories, by Dale Andrew White,

    Return of the Dittos and other stories, by Dale Andrew White, is a collection of twenty short stories and all of which are worth reading. Mr. White uses irresistible humor and keen insight into human nature in his stories and the end result is an enjoyable reading experience.
    In the opening story, An Unlikely Story, the reader is treated to the monologue of a man accused offering a woman money for certain services. It is important to note that the woman is an undercover police woman. The defense he offers is creative, clever and original. Return of the Dittos is about the reunion show of the cast of a sitcom called Eat Your Peas which aired thirty years ago. The author's descriptions of the cast members are memorable. The Labors of Peon, my personal favorite, is the tale of Adam Peon's short lived career as a bagboy at a Dixie King grocery store. This job changes his life and with good reason. Due to unforeseen developments, Adam finds himself in the position of labor organizer when the bagboys learn that their tips are to be discontinued. What transpires when the bagboys revolt is hysterical.
    Richly developed characters paired with humorous dialogue and story lines the reader can relate to add up to great reading. The author uses wit and humor to engage the reader. I highly recommend reading these stories.
    I received this book free of charge from Review the Book and I give this review of my own free will.

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  • Posted August 19, 2012

    What is the book about? A collection of short stories from the

    What is the book about? A collection of short stories from the author
    Dale Andrew White. A wide collection of different stories that will
    appeal to a variety of people. Dale's stories vary from dark and gloomy
    to laugh-out-loud humor, which shows how versatile the author really is
    when it comes to his writing style. What did I think of the book? My
    favorite short story in this collection was "Labors of Peon" a
    story about a bag boy who fights for his right to accept tips from
    customers. You'll lift an eyebrow and chuckle at
    "Infatuated." You'll laugh out loud at stories like
    "Little Birdie" and "The Simpkins Revelation." Enjoy
    all twenty stories all at once or read them throughout the day, either
    way you'll love this book. Each story is just long enough to contain
    enough detail but short enough to read while riding the subway.

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  • Posted May 30, 2012

    A short story is always enjoyable as long as it makes sense, e



    A short story is always enjoyable as long as it makes sense, entertains and holds the reader’s attention for its short life span. A prime example of well written short stories can be found in the book Return of the Dittos and other stories. This book is a collection of unique, absorbing and entertaining short stories by author Dale Andrew White that definitely meet the criteria for the enjoyable short story. Andrew Dale White is also the author of Moe Howard Died for Our Sins which is another well received novel.
    Author Dale White is a marvelous storyteller that has a keen talent for producing humorous and sometimes fantastical stories that often arise from a rather skewed point of view. The stories included in this well written collection are very entertaining with lots of wit and satire to entice the reader to read on and before you know it you have reached the end of this great read. While reading this book I often found myself laughing out loud many times and other readers will experience the same which made it enjoyable and an easy read.
    All of the stories in this book are great but there are a few that continue to resonate well after reading such as An Unlikely Story, The Return of the Dittos, Labors of Peon, Crossed Paths and The Simpkins Revelation. Ranging from the witty to the bizarre and all the stories in this collection are worth the read and I enthusiastically recommend this book.

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  • Posted January 7, 2011

    Short, sharp and full of laughs.

    The short story genre has always been a difficult one for me to settle in to. Simple because by the time I am settling in to a story, it's over. It's a difficult thing to write effectively, and I suspect even more difficult to read when one is used to the normal, long-form novel. Dale Andrew White has crafted a collection of tales that captured my interested and held it fast through each of the 175 pages. From the Bagboy Liberation Army of The Labors of Peon to the quiet unassuming Miss Mona Darner in In Lieu of Flowers this collection is resplendent in characters you will identify with, laugh at, sympathise with, cheer for and more than anything else recognise. There are highs and lows of course, some stories will hit the mark and you'll catch yourself laughing out loud. Others are interesting but land a little wide of the humour mark, but this doesn't mean they still aren't enjoyable. And after all, humour is very subjective. While some rest heavily on satire, there is a fair sprinkling of puns throughout, as well as a smattering of social commentary hidden beneath a thin veneer of silliness. The style of White's writing slips from narrative to reporting in some tales, and regularly switches from first to third person. If you take each story as a piece in its own right, and perhaps read one at a time, or in short bursts the issue noted by other reviewers of 'flow' is dealt with fairly easily. This isn't a book to sit down and read cover to cover, but rather to visit with cups of coffee, at lunch, on the bus. If you can prevent yourself from laughing out loud that is. This is my first opportunity to read any of Dale Andrew White's work, his previous offering Moe Howard Died for our Sins was very well received, and I'm sure this offering will be too. There is no doubt in my mind that White is a natural born storyteller, the 20 short tales within Return of the Dittos (and other stories) confirms that.

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  • Posted June 22, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    An original book of satirical short stories

    If you have the type of humor that appreciates the bizarre and offbeat, and count me in, then you will enjoy the Return of the Dittos by Dale Andrew White. White's eccentric and quirky sense of humor is evidenced throughout the book, taking the reader through twists and turns, delights and mishaps in this collection of short stories.

    White begins his collection with "An Unlikely Story," a tale with a shifting narrative that keeps the reader guessing as to the place and circumstances of the plot. The conclusion of the story is creative and unconventional, leaving the reader pleasantly surprised. Other stories, such as "On Tour with Confederate Thunder" are simply hysterical. In this story a generic sixties rock musician delights and repels a Rolling Stone magazine-type reporter with the history of his band, all while in a drug induced haze. And just as you've seen in countless exploitive interviews, the reporter treks to this has-beens mother who, of course, foreshadowed her son's demise years ago, summing up his life with this astute comment, "[He went] to Sodom and Gonorrhea, just like the Bible warns." There are many funny lines in this mock send up of a washed up band, and White makes the tale thoroughly believable and funny.

    "Principal Knuckell Meets the Press" brings back wistful memories of high school journalism class and the predicament of writing countless hackneyed stories of cheerleaders and cafeteria food while ignoring the more controversial aspects of school politics. When Adam decides to investigate who benefits most from the school budget, he lands in hot water with the administration. Despite the fact that his hopes of making the paper more relevant are dashed, Adam finds a way to outsmart the principal and keep the paper going. It is stories like this that go to the heart of the debate about free speech and school censorship, all the while White manages to relay the account with wit and panache. Some stories are equally ambitious, but deflate about half way through. "The Craving" is one such story that has an interesting premise, but suddenly goes awry and becomes more mocking than humorous. However, on the whole this is a well written book by a very talented author.

    The stories vary in style, from satire to subtle humor to slapstick. Each story is compact and varied in subject matter and tone. White's creative instinct and zany sense of humor are what make the stories so compelling. Reading Return of the Dittos is a satisfying way to spend the afternoon.

    Quill says: An original book of satirical short stories from a talented author.

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