Return on Learning: Training for High Performance at Accenture [NOOK Book]

Overview


Like most corporations at the turn of the millennium, Accenture was faced with business, economic, and operational changes affecting its renowned internal training program, which shapes and supports the work of its more than 126,000 employees in 48 countries. The company quickly reinvented its training and development capabilities through effective planning and governance, strong leadership, groundbreaking ROI methods, operational rigor, and the application of advanced technologies, as well as "phenomenal ...
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Return on Learning: Training for High Performance at Accenture

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Overview


Like most corporations at the turn of the millennium, Accenture was faced with business, economic, and operational changes affecting its renowned internal training program, which shapes and supports the work of its more than 126,000 employees in 48 countries. The company quickly reinvented its training and development capabilities through effective planning and governance, strong leadership, groundbreaking ROI methods, operational rigor, and the application of advanced technologies, as well as "phenomenal learning." This accessible book explains how it happened, and how to apply the lessons to any business.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781572846258
  • Publisher: Agate
  • Publication date: 3/1/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: First Trade Paper Edition
  • Pages: 190
  • Sales rank: 1,195,306
  • File size: 585 KB

Meet the Author


Donald Vanthournout is chief learning officer at Accenture. Kurt Olson, John Ceisel, Andrew White, Tad Waddington, Thomas Barfield, Samir Desai, and Craig Mindrum are all with Accenture.
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Table of Contents

1 High performance through learning 5
2 A vision for learning and business impact 19
3 Proving the ROI in learning 39
4 The leadership to succeed 59
5 Phenomenal learning 79
6 Running learning like a business 101
7 Using technology to create a high-performance learning organization 127
8 At the frontiers of learning and knowledge sharing 143
9 Learning and value creation : Accenture looks to the future 167
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2012

    boring

    Nothing I can take away from this book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2008

    Creating company value with training

    This concise, clearly written book describes how Accenture went from being a company that put its entire workforce through a standard suite of courses to becoming a company with a knowledge-sharing culture. Accenture¿s employees now embody its knowledge and service capability. Even though your company is probably different from Accenture, your workforce is still the engine that allows it to grow and compete. A company can thrive only if its people have the opportunity to constantly renew their skills. If that level of knowledge management is part of your goals, getAbstract recommends this case study of how to create a high-performance learning culture.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 23, 2006

    Compelling and helpful

    I finished this book on a cross-country flight this week (the book is admirably short and punchy) and I¿m still shaking my head over it. If you know anything about Accenture you know they like to control their messages, and yet this book is incredibly honest about how business change had created a negative impact on its workforce. (Actual quote from the book, when Accenture¿s CLO is trying to convince his executives that something had to be done: ¿The deal we have made with our people has been broken.¿) But then the book proceeds to tell an entirely believable story of how they turned things around. Sure, there is the ocasional bit of consulting-speak in here, but most of what you get are practical ideas about how to plan, how to get your executives on board (please give this book to your local CEO/COO/CFO), how to use outsourcing in a smart way, how to use technology, etc., etc. And its not filled with theory but practical experiences of real people. For those with the background/interest, there is also a chapter on the number-crunching. Doubt it if you want to, but these guys proved that Accenture gets a 353 percent return on every dollar it spends on training. From what I can tell by reading that chapter, the real number probably is higher. Not everyone is going to have the money Accenture has to throw at problems like this, but I can¿t think of a single thing that another CEO or HR/learning executive like myself couldn¿t apply in some way to his or her organization. On top of it all, the book is written in a totally compelling way. Other writers of business books, take note: it¿s written such that the authors are actually characters in a story. As a reader, your brought along as if you were reading a novel. Even if learning or HR isn¿t your thing, take a read to see how you can plan any kind of reinvention business program. A really well done book, and worth the time it took for me to write a few words saying, ¿Way to go.¿

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2006

    Worth its weight in gold

    It's always challenging to bridge the gap between high-level theory in Human Resources, and the confusing mire of on-the-ground action. It's all very well to `know' that you need your HR and training practices to align with and support your business strategy. But how is this accomplished? When you're faced with convincing executives, with other priorities and little time, to support what are often costly initiatives in Content Management and Corporate Training, and trying to make a good fit between what vendors offer and what your organization needs, when your budget has been cut and your employees have high-standards- it can seem as if you've been asked to juggle cats. Return on Learning is the story of how one organization, Accenture, managed to successfully align training with business strategy, working on a budget that was cut in half, while maintaining extremely high-standards for the learning delivered to employees. The story is delivered from an in-the-trenches perspective for HR and Training professionals. There are no pat and `easy' answers here, but there are several ideas and innovations about `how' they did it that make this book worth it's weight in gold. Among these innovations are the V-Model (that guides training from goal through design and delivery to measurement), and an award-winning, innovative methodology for measuring the ROI of training that takes you out of the realm of estimates and into the promised land of hard data. Accenture manages to run training like a business, and not just as a catch-phrase. If you want to see how it's done, when it's really done well, this is a good place to start.

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