Return to the Same City by Paco Ignacio Taibo II, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Return to the Same City

Return to the Same City

by Paco Ignacio Taibo II
     
 

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Hector Belascoaran Shayne is a gun-carrying argonaut of Mexico City, a man with a death wish waiting to come true. When a woman tells him a sob story about her sister's death at the hands of a handsome rumba dancer, Belascoaran agrees to take care of him. The P.I.'s hunt leads him to the shores of Acapulco Bay where he discovers that his charismatic murderer leads a

Overview

Hector Belascoaran Shayne is a gun-carrying argonaut of Mexico City, a man with a death wish waiting to come true. When a woman tells him a sob story about her sister's death at the hands of a handsome rumba dancer, Belascoaran agrees to take care of him. The P.I.'s hunt leads him to the shores of Acapulco Bay where he discovers that his charismatic murderer leads a dangerous life involving CIA operatives and stolen archaeological treasures. But the deeper Belascoaran digs, the closer he comes to fulfilling his own dark desire, as his chase leads him to Tijuana for a confrontation with a killer.

Editorial Reviews

Chicago Tribune
Exciting, reflective, and witty....Shayne is alive and back in business.
LA Times
A darkly amusing, yet disturbingly haunting tale.
Toronto Globe and Mail
Like all of Taibo's best work, this story weaves politics, crime, sociology, and the marvelous history and mythology of Mexico into a tapestry rich with unforgettable characters.
NY Times Book Review
Mordantly funny....With a formerly dead man to guide us, we begin to see what Mr. Taibo means when he refers to Mexico as the "terrain of surprising reality" where the grotesque is a natural part of life.
Mostly Murder
The welcome renaissance of Belascoaran from Latin America's answer to Dashiell Hammett.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Taibo's novels about Mexico City detective Hector Belascoaran Shayne (No Happy Ending) are an addicting import. At first, their hard-boiled surrealistic flightsas if Garca Mrquez had been taking writing lessons from Dashiell Hammettcan strike a reader as excessive and glib, but soon they become part of a beguiling worldview in which everything, including crime and love, are elements in a cosmic joke. So you find here that Hector, left a bullet-riddled corpse in the rain in No Happy Ending, has been miraculously resurrected for another case. It involves a shadowy figure with several names, who seems to have caused the suicide of someone's sister and is being pursued by an alcoholic American reporter with sources in the CIA. Is the many-aliased Luke Estrella also involved in a guns-for-drugs Contra operation? Hector doesn't really care, but sets off in dogged pursuit anyway, to Acapulco, then Tijuana, finally bringing matters to a head in a hilarious climax involving several hired mariachi bands, armed to the teeth, in an empty warehouse. Don't forget the two ducks that live under Hector's bed, and how down he gets when he runs out of Coke. As noted, these tales are an easily acquired taste. (Sept.)
Kirkus Reviews
It's tough enough returning from the dead—and Taibo's prefatory note blithely disclaims any knowledge of how Héctor Belascoarán Shayne survived the hail of bullets that apparently killed him at the unhappy end of No Happy Ending (1993)—without having to go back to punching a time clock, and Belascoarán is in no hurry to take the case foisted on him by a would-be client named Alicia. But Alicia is inventive and persistent, and at length Belascoarán agrees to shadow Luke Estrella, the Cuban who drove his wife, Alicia's sister Elena, to cocaine and early death. Joining forces with a gringo reporter, Belascoarán soon realizes that killing Elena is the least of Estrella's crimes, and certainly the most mundane of his adventures. Under various aliases, Estrella has cut the hands off the dead Che Guevara, fixed prices in the international cocaine trade, trafficked in arms for the Nicaraguan contras, hobnobbed with pornography publishers and archeological looters, and—together with a transnational corporate attorney and a loose-cannon CIA op—served as a judge for the Señorita Bikini Acapulco '88 competition. The story of how Belascoarán brings this cartoon monster of evil down with the help of an avenging mariachi band is an engaging pendant to his Héctorless epic Leonardo's Bicycle (1995).

Fans of Mexico City's greatest one-eyed detective will be overjoyed to find him not only alive and dyspeptic as ever but deeply smitten with his client: "How he loved her. She was the ideal woman for a suicide pact."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780446405201
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing
Publication date:
10/01/1997
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
4.16(w) x 6.82(h) x 0.49(d)

What People are saying about this

Laura Esquivel
"I am his number-one fan....I can always lose myself in one of his novels because of their intelligence and humor. My secret wish is to become one of the characters in his fiction, all of them drawn from the wit and wisdom of popular imagination."

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