Reviving the Spirit, Reforming Society: Religion in the 1800s

Reviving the Spirit, Reforming Society: Religion in the 1800s

by Kenneth McIntosh
     
 

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Founded on the principles of religious freedom, America in the 1800s was fertile ground for the expansion of religious movements and all kinds of experiments in spiritual matters. Americans in the 1800s took their religion very seriously. Away from the authority of established churches, the American frontier from upstate New York to the wilds of the Utah territory was… See more details below

Overview

Founded on the principles of religious freedom, America in the 1800s was fertile ground for the expansion of religious movements and all kinds of experiments in spiritual matters. Americans in the 1800s took their religion very seriously. Away from the authority of established churches, the American frontier from upstate New York to the wilds of the Utah territory was a hotbed of new, radical religion based on a personal experience of salvation, direct revelation, and enthusiastic, highly emotional gatherings at camp meetings. At the forefront of the movement to abolish slavery and women’s rights, idealistic men and women in the more established Protestant churches heard a new social gospel from an educated and progressive clergy. Meanwhile, large numbers of Catholic immigrants and Jews from Central and Eastern Europe established their own religious institutions in a new land. The religious history of America in the 1800s is rich and diverse and highly influential in the social and political evolution of our country.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Greg M. Romaneck
In nineteenth century American religious belief was expressed in a wide variety of ways. Methodist preachers in the 1800s toured the countryside preaching in barns, homes, and out-of-doors in an effort to spread the word of God.. Through fair and foul weather these barnstorming preachers carried on, often to the great detriment of their health. Indeed, as Kenneth McIntosh recounts in this volume in the illustrated "Daily Life in America in the 1800s" series, these itinerant Methodist preachers led to the coining of a colloquialism common in the mid-nineteenth century. On rainy or miserable days it was often said that "It's a day only crows or Methodist preachers would be out and about." It is in telling anecdotes such as the aforementioned one that McIntosh does his best in this particular work. Through his eye for detail and human interest, McIntosh presents an important aspect of nineteenth century American life to his readers. However, as is true of other books in this series, that talent is sometimes overwhelmed by the paucity of content. Too great a span of years and events are crammed into a very concise book. The end result is a text that could be of interest to some readers and which may serve as a supplement to the study of America in the nineteenth century. Unfortunately, this summary is rather sparse and only episodically interesting. Reviewer: Greg M. Romaneck

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781422296875
Publisher:
Mason Crest
Publication date:
09/29/2014
Series:
Daily Life in America in the 1800s
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
64
File size:
13 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
Up to 17 Years

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