Revolution and Consumption in Late Medieval England

Overview

The essays in this volume focus on the sources and resources of political power, on consumption (royal and lay, conspicuous and everyday) on political revolution and on economic regulation in the later middle ages. Topics range from the diet of the nobility in the fifteenth century to the knightly household of Richard II and the peace commissions, while particular case studies, of Middlesex, Cambridge, Durham Cathedral and Winchester, shed new light on regional economies through an examination of the patterns of ...
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Overview

The essays in this volume focus on the sources and resources of political power, on consumption (royal and lay, conspicuous and everyday) on political revolution and on economic regulation in the later middle ages. Topics range from the diet of the nobility in the fifteenth century to the knightly household of Richard II and the peace commissions, while particular case studies, of Middlesex, Cambridge, Durham Cathedral and Winchester, shed new light on regional economies through an examination of the patterns of consumption, retailing, and marketing.Professor MICHAEL HICKS teaches at King Alfred's College at Winchester.Contributors: CHRISTOPHER WOOLGAR, ALASTAIR DUNN, SHELAGH MITCHELL, ALISON GUNDY, T.B. PUGH, JESSICA FREEMAN, JOHN HARE, JOHN LEE, MIRANDA THRELFALL-HOLMES, WINIFRED HARWOOD, PETER FLEMING.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Hicks adeptly draws out the themes of this diverse and rewarding volue, rightly observing hat it reflects the vigour and debate of late medieval studies. ENGLISH HISTORICAL REVIEW Fifteenth-century studies are very much alive and well... able to generate new and challenging research agendas. This excellent collection reflects that well. ECONOMIC HISTORY REVIEW
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780851158327
  • Publisher: Boydell & Brewer, Limited
  • Publication date: 10/4/2001
  • Series: The Fifteenth Century, #2
  • Pages: 208
  • Product dimensions: 5.34 (w) x 11.84 (h) x 0.86 (d)

Table of Contents

List of Tables
List of Contributors
Abbreviations
Introduction 1
Fast and Feast: Conspicuous Consumption and the Diet of the Nobility in the Fifteenth Century 7
Exploitation and Control: The Royal Administration of Magnate Estates, 1397-1405 27
The Knightly Household of Richard II and the Peace Commissions 45
The Earl of Warwick and the Royal Affinity in the Politics of the West Midlands, 1389-1399 57
The Estates, Finances and Regal Aspirations of Richard Plantagenet (1411-1460), Duke of York 71
Middlesex in the Fifteenth Century: Community or Communities? 89
Regional Prosperity in Fifteenth-Century England: Some Evidence from Wessex 105
The Trade of Fifteenth-Century Cambridge and its Region 127
Durham Cathedral Priory's Consumption of Imported Goods: Wines and Spices, 1464-1520 141
The Impact of St. Swithun's Priory on the City of Winchester in the Later Middle Ages 159
Telling Tales of Oligarchy in the Late Medieval Town 177
Index 194
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