Revolution (The Sixties Trilogy Series #2)

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Overview


*A 2014 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST*
 
It's 1964, and Sunny's town is being invaded.  Or at least that's what the adults of Greenwood, Mississippi, are saying. All Sunny knows is that people from up north are coming to help people register to vote.  They're calling it Freedom Summer.
 
Meanwhile, Sunny can't help but feel like her house is being invaded, too.  She has a new stepmother, a new brother, and a new sister ...
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Revolution (The Sixties Trilogy Series #2)

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Overview


*A 2014 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST*
 
It's 1964, and Sunny's town is being invaded.  Or at least that's what the adults of Greenwood, Mississippi, are saying. All Sunny knows is that people from up north are coming to help people register to vote.  They're calling it Freedom Summer.
 
Meanwhile, Sunny can't help but feel like her house is being invaded, too.  She has a new stepmother, a new brother, and a new sister crowding her life, giving her little room to breathe.  And things get even trickier when Sunny and her brother are caught sneaking into the local swimming pool -- where they bump into a mystery boy whose life is going to become tangled up in theirs.
 
As she did in her groundbreaking documentary novel COUNTDOWN, award-winning author Deborah Wiles uses stories and images to tell the riveting story of a certain time and place -- and of kids who, in a world where everyone is choosing sides, must figure out how to stand up for themselves and fight for what's right.

Finalist for the 2014 National Book Award for Young People's Literature
2014 Parents' Choice Award Approved Historical Fiction

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
★ 06/23/2014
This second installment of Wiles's Sixties Trilogy begins during the Freedom Summer of 1964, when hundreds of college students and community organizers arrived to help Mississippi's disenfranchised black citizens overcome voting hurdles erected by local officials. Sunny Fairchild, 12, has seen newspaper stories about these "invaders" and feels an affinity: her household has been taken over by her father's new wife, her children, and her elderly mother. Still, Sunny plans a summer floating in the (whites only) municipal pool, listening to the Beatles, and finding adventures. A chance encounter with Raymond, a talented young black athlete, sets Sunny on a dangerous course, one that exposes the poisonous racism that has her small town on the verge of exploding. As in Countdown (2010), Wiles intersperses Sunny and Raymond's story with historic photos, excerpts from speeches and news stories, and song lyrics that add power and heft to the story. Though the novel is long, it's also accessible and moving, and it will open many eyes to the brutal, not-so-distant past out of which a new standard of fairness and equality arose. Ages 8–12. Agent: Steven Malk, Writers House. (May)
From the Publisher

Praise for THE SIXTIES TRILOGY #1: COUNTDOWN:

* "Wiles skillfully keeps many balls in the air, giving readers a story that appeals across the decades as well as offering enticing paths into the history." -- BOOKLIST, starred review

* "The larger story . . . told here in an expert coupling of text and design, is how life endures, even triumphs, no matter how perilous the times." -- HORN BOOK, starred review

* "References to duct tape (then newly invented), McDonald's and other pop culture lend authenticity to this phenomenal story of the beginnings of radical change in America." -- KIRKUS, starred review

* "Wiles palpably recreates the fear kids felt when air-raid sirens and duck-and-cover drills were routine . . . this story is sure to strike a chord with those living through tough times today." -- PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, starred review

Kirkus Starred Review
Freedom Summer in 1964 Mississippi brings both peaceful protest and violence into the lives of two young people.

Twelve-year-old Sunny, who’s white, cannot accept her new stepmother and stepsiblings. Raymond, “a colored boy,” is impatient for integration to open the town’s pool, movie theater and baseball field. When trained volunteers for the Council of Federated Organizations—an amalgam of civil rights groups—flood the town to register black voters and establish schools, their work is met with suspicion and bigotry by whites and fear and welcome by blacks. In this companion to Countdown (2010) (with returning character Jo Ellen as one of the volunteers), Wiles once again blends a coming-of-age story with pulsating documentary history. Excerpts from contemporary newspapers, leaflets and brochures brutally expose Ku Klux Klan hatred and detailStudent Nonviolent Coordinating Committee instructions on how to react to arrest while on a picket line. Song lyrics from the Beatles, Motown and spirituals provide a cultural context. Copious photographs and subnarratives encapsulate a very wide range of contemporary people and events. But it is Sunny and, more briefly, Raymond who anchor the story as their separate and unequal lives cross paths again and again and culminate in a horrific drive-by shooting. A stepmother to embrace and equal rights are the prizes—even as the conflict in Vietnam escalates.

Fifty years later, 1960s words and images still sound and resound in this triumphant middle volume of the author’s Sixties Trilogy.

*"It’s an ambitious, heady endeavor that succeeds wonderfully in capturing the atmosphere of that pivotal and eventful summer, with the documents offering a broader context"- Horn Books, starred review

*"Though the novel is long, it's also accessible and moving, and it will open many eyes to the brutal, not-so-distant past out of which a new standard of fairness and equality arose. "- Publishers Weekly, starred review

From the Publisher

Praise for THE SIXTIES TRILOGY #1: COUNTDOWN:

* "Wiles skillfully keeps many balls in the air, giving readers a story that appeals across the decades as well as offering enticing paths into the history." -- BOOKLIST, starred review

* "The larger story . . . told here in an expert coupling of text and design, is how life endures, even triumphs, no matter how perilous the times." -- HORN BOOK, starred review

* "References to duct tape (then newly invented), McDonald's and other pop culture lend authenticity to this phenomenal story of the beginnings of radical change in America." -- KIRKUS, starred review

* "Wiles palpably recreates the fear kids felt when air-raid sirens and duck-and-cover drills were routine . . . this story is sure to strike a chord with those living through tough times today." -- PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, starred review

VOYA, August 2014 (Vol. 37, No. 3) - Loryn Aman
It is the summer of 1964 in Mississippi, and Sunny and her step-brother, Gillette, have decided to celebrate by sneaking out of the house and going for a moonlit swim. What the pair did not expect was they would not be the only ones with this bright idea: there was also another boy in the pool that night. Raymond is not allowed to do many of the things that Sunny and Gillette are allowed to—all because of the color of his skin. The chance meeting is the start of many events in their lives during this summer, and once this happens their fates cannot help but be wound together. In the heart of the South during 1964, there are two sides when it comes to racial equality: those who want it, and those who do not. Sunny, Gillette, and Raymond are right in the middle of this battle. Both Sunny and Gillette are adjusting to their new family lives, while Sunny also tests her limits with her father. Raymond’s whole world is changing with family and friends calling for equality, and his own family working to figure out where they fit in this new future. It makes for an intense period in all their lives. Wiles has (once again) done a fantastic job of retelling history in an interesting and engaging way. She intersperses song lyrics, mini-biographies, and photographs to create a novel that brings this terrible period in United States history to life. The story is told mostly from Sunny, Gillette, and Raymond’s points of view, placing readers back in time during a scorching summer in Mississippi. A solid work of historical fiction that may not be wildly popular, it is an important read. Reviewer: Loryn Aman; Ages 11 to 15.
Children's Literature - Amy S. Hansen
In the summer of 1964 in Greenwood, Mississippi, people with white skin could go swimming in a public pool. People with black or brown skin could not. People with light skin could go to the movies. People with dark skin could not. And most importantly, people with light skin could vote. And citizens who had dark skin could not. In Wiles’ second book of the “Sixties Trilogy,” we are in the Freedom Summer—the planned mass voter registration run by SNCC and CORE and other civil rights groups. Wiles’ writing puts us so strongly in the time and place that after a few minutes we start to sweat in the Mississippi heat and can almost taste the Sunday dinner in Greenwood. On the day we get there, a white twelve-year-old girl, Sunny (short for Sunshine), sneaks into the pool with her stepbrother. They want to take a late-night swim to celebrate the fact that they’ve been siblings for a year. The problem is that another boy had also thought of a late night swim. Ray came to the pool at night because he isn’t allowed in during the day. When Sunny bumps into him she screams. Ray runs. The police arrive. The pool is one of the many dividing lines in the town. And town is about to go to battle. Fortunately, there are good people on both sides so we have hope that peace and justice will prevail. Like the first book in the series, Countdown, this story is told by several narrators, and punctuated by pictures and nonfiction accounts of the real events. This book will make you cry and cheer. Reviewer: Amy S. Hansen; Ages 8 to 12.
School Library Journal
★ 05/01/2014
Gr 5–8—In Wiles's second installment of the trilogy, readers are offered two alternate viewpoints from very different worlds within the same Greenwood, Mississippi town during the tumultuous Freedom Summer of 1964. Sunny, a 12-year-old white girl, is worried about reports of "invaders" descending upon the sleepy Southern enclave and causing trouble. Meanwhile, Raymond, a black boy from Baptist Town (known among the white citizens as "Colored Town"), is becoming increasingly aware of all the places (especially the public pool and Leflore's theater) he is barred from attending due to Jim Crow laws. As Sunny's worldview is suddenly expanded as she begins to learn more about the sinister underbelly of her seemingly perfect town, her story intersects with Raymond's. Among the cadre of brave young volunteers working to register black Mississippians to vote—a mix of white and black members of various civil rights associations—is Jo Ellen, the older sister from Countdown (Scholastic, 2010). As in the first book, song lyrics, biblical verses, photographs, speeches, essays, and other ephemera immerse readers in one of the most important—and dangerous—moments during the Civil Rights Movement. While Sunny's experiences receive a slightly deeper focus than Raymond's, readers are offered a window into each community and will see both characters change and grow over the course of the summer. Inclusion of primary source materials, including the text of a real and vile pamphlet created by KKK members, does not shy away from the reality and hurtful language used by bigots during this time period. For those looking to extend the story with a full-sensory experience, the author has compiled YouTube clips of each song referenced in the book on a Pinterest board (http://ow.ly/vBGTc). With elements of family drama and coming-of-age themes that mirror the larger sociopolitical backdrop, Revolution is a book that lingers long after the last page.—Kiera Parrott, School Library Journal
Kirkus Reviews
★ 2014-03-31
Freedom Summer in 1964 Mississippi brings both peaceful protest and violence into the lives of two young people. Twelve-year-old Sunny, who's white, cannot accept her new stepmother and stepsiblings. Raymond, "a colored boy," is impatient for integration to open the town's pool, movie theater and baseball field. When trained volunteers for the Council of Federated Organizations—an amalgam of civil rights groups—flood the town to register black voters and establish schools, their work is met with suspicion and bigotry by whites and fear and welcome by blacks. In this companion to Countdown (2010) (with returning character Jo Ellen as one of the volunteers), Wiles once again blends a coming-of-age story with pulsating documentary history. Excerpts from contemporary newspapers, leaflets and brochures brutally expose Ku Klux Klan hatred and detail Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee instructions on how to react to arrest while on a picket line. Song lyrics from the Beatles, Motown and spirituals provide a cultural context. Copious photographs and subnarratives encapsulate a very wide range of contemporary people and events. But it is Sunny and, more briefly, Raymond who anchor the story as their separate and unequal lives cross paths again and again and culminate in a horrific drive-by shooting. A stepmother to embrace and equal rights are the prizes—even as the conflict in Vietnam escalates. Fifty years later, 1960s words and images still sound and resound in this triumphant middle volume of the author's Sixties Trilogy. (author's note, bibliography) (Historical fiction. 11-15)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780545106078
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 5/27/2014
  • Series: Sixties Trilogy Series , #2
  • Pages: 544
  • Sales rank: 43,959
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 840L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 1.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Deborah Wiles is the author of the picture book FREEDOM SUMMER and three novels: LOVE, RUBY LAVENDER; THE AURORA COUNTY ALL-STARS; and EACH LITTLE BIRD THAT SINGS, a National Book Award finalist. She has vivid memories of ducking and covering under her school desk during air raid drills at the time of the Cuban Missile Crisis. She also sang in the Glee Club, was a champion speller, and hated Field Day. Deborah lives in Atlanta, Georgia.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 2, 2014

    I apologize in advance for an unhelpful review, and for doing so

    I apologize in advance for an unhelpful review, and for doing something I (unlike the two apparent children who have "reviewed" this new release before me) never have done before, which is: rate a book I've not yet read. I've left a 5-star rating in order to balance out the two 1-star labels by a couple of those bratty (IMO) role-playing warrior kitties whom the moderators at B&N continually allow to roam rampant on the review pages, unfairly savaging with a mouse click an author's hard work.
    This book sounds like a very worthy sequel to a highly regarded first work in a planned trilogy, which deserves to be reviewed on its own merits, not as part of some unsupervised pre-teen scavenger hunt. I've of course flagged the other reviews; please feel welcome to report me as well -- I look forward to all three of our entries being removed, as long as it brings this annoying problem to the attention of someone, anyone, at B&N who could provide pest control once & for all... (is there such a thing as a "cyber-spay & neuter" program??)
    To the author -- you've earned the right to expect better. I'd like to read your work, beginning with the prior novel in this series, and then return with a legitimate review.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2014

    Excellent book!

    Well written story about the Freedom Summer of 1964, which gives the reader a good understanding of racial tensions in the South, especially in Mississippi. Loved the photos that were throughout the book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2014

    Posty

    Pop

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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