Revolution Is Not a Dinner Party [NOOK Book]

Overview

The summer of 1972, before I turned nine, danger began knocking on doors all over China.

Nine-year-old Ling has a very happy life. Her parents are both dedicated surgeons at the best hospital in Wuhan, and her father teaches her English as they listen to Voice of America every evening on the radio. But when one of Mao’s political officers moves into a room in their apartment, Ling begins to witness the gradual disintegration of her world. In ...

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Revolution Is Not a Dinner Party

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Overview

The summer of 1972, before I turned nine, danger began knocking on doors all over China.

Nine-year-old Ling has a very happy life. Her parents are both dedicated surgeons at the best hospital in Wuhan, and her father teaches her English as they listen to Voice of America every evening on the radio. But when one of Mao’s political officers moves into a room in their apartment, Ling begins to witness the gradual disintegration of her world. In an atmosphere of increasing mistrust and hatred, Ling fears for the safety of her neighbors, and soon, for herself and her family. For the next four years, Ling will suffer more horrors than many people face in a lifetime. Will she be able to grow and blossom under the oppressive rule of Chairman Mao? Or will fighting to survive destroy her spirit—and end her life?
 

Revolution Is Not a Dinner Party is a 2008 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Picture book and cookbook author Compestine (The Real Story of Stone Soup) turns to 1972 China as the setting for her first YA novel. Eight-year-old Ling, the spunky daughter of two doctors, lives in Wuhan, China; dreamy and idealistic, she often describes her world in metaphor (about her neighbor, Ling notes, "Mrs. Wong was fragrant and warm like a red peony, which always welcomed visitors"). But the lives of Ling and her family are disrupted when Comrade Li, an officer of the Communist Party, moves into their apartment. Difficulties mount as friends and neighbors disappear, Ling's father is arrested and she endures vicious tormenting at school because of her "bourgeois" background ("At times I wished my family was poor and my parents worked on a vegetable farm... so I could have friends. But if my parents worked on a farm, who would treat their patients?"). Although her father has been jailed, her family starved and their books burned, Ling fights to keep her long hair, a symbol of dignity and individualism to her, though her classmates see it as emblematic of Ling's "privilege." Ling survives on wit, hope and courage until the death of Chairman Mao, after which she and her mother have a joyful reunion with Ling's father. Readers should remain rapt by Compestine's storytelling throughout this gripping account of life during China's Cultural Revolution. Ages 10-up. (Aug.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
KLIATT - Claire Rosser
Based on the author's family's experiences in China during the Cultural Revolution under Mao, this tells of one family's losses in that turbulent era. The narrator Ling is a little child at the beginning of her story, and as her family faces more and more hardship, she gets older and tougher. Ling is the only child of a loving father who is a doctor and a mother who works at the hospital too. As the story begins, they enjoy a wonderful life together. Soon, however, they are accused of being enemies of the people and their comfortable life gets harder and harder. Ling's father is imprisoned, yet released occasionally to perform surgeries on party officials, so Ling tries to sneak into the hospital to catch a glimpse of her father at those times. Ling's mother gets more and more depressed, and Ling is afraid she will commit suicide. The title is taken from a saying of Chairman Mao. Compestine does a good job giving young YA readers a realistic picture of what that period of history meant to individuals caught in the political nightmare. Certainly those with a Chinese heritage will find the story important to understand their own family history.
VOYA - Nancy Zachary
The Cultural Revolution marches into young Ling Chang's life, upsetting the pleasant routines of living in the medical complex. Beautifully descriptive phrases allow this autobiographical fiction to come alive with the colors of the clothing that are lovingly sewn for Ling, the aromatic preparations of the food that is cooked, and the genuine appreciation of school, work, and valued neighbors. Then Comrade Li is forced to live in the Chang home, and as the Red Guard takes over, people are spied upon, denounced, and arrested, including Ling's surgeon father. Mounting fear pervades daily life, rations become scarce, and in the name of Mao's revolution, the bourgeois are the enemy. Ling is ostracized and bullied at school and the danger of losing her parents lurks around every corner. Violence is highlighted in vivid detail, and the reader watches the changes as they affect Ling growing up. The secret radio to the West, the image of the Golden Gate Bridge, and the question of the nature of freedom draw American readers into a historically accurate portrayal of this period in China. The simple narrative is refreshingly reminiscent of Red Scarf Girl by Ji Li Jiang (HarperCollins, 1997/VOYA June 1996) and Chinese Cinderella by Adeline Yen Mah (Delacorte, 1999/VOYA December 1999) in its youthful disbelief of the hardships that have befallen them in a changing political situation.
Children's Literature - Mary Jo Edwards
During the early 1970s, nine-year-old Ling and her parents lived through the Chinese Cultural Revolution. Without an invitation, one of Chairman Mao Zedong's political officers moved in with the family. Ling's father was subsequently imprisoned for being a "bourgeois sympathizer." At school, Ling's individuality and life were threatened on a daily basis by her revolutionary classmates. The death of Chairman Mao on September 9, 1976, marked the beginning of better days ahead for Ling, her parents, and the Chinese people. Many of the events in Compestine's fictional debut novel actually occurred during her childhood. Early on in this story, Ling felt closer to her father as a result of her mother's constant criticism. After her protective father's imprisonment, Ling relied on her mother and her own five senses to survive. The similes that are used by Compestine—"Ling, your hair is as dry as dead grass"—add to the story's appeal. This freedom-loving reviewer appreciated this novel.
School Library Journal

Gr 5 Up -Ling, the daughter of two doctors, has a comfortable life in Wuhan, China. She enjoys her English lessons with her father and the walks they take along the river. Her life changes dramatically when Comrade Li, one of Maoa€™s political officers, moves into her familya€™s apartment in this coming-of-age novel (Holt, 2007) by Ying Chang Compestine. Ling watches helplessly as family friends are taken away by the military. Her father burns old photos and English language books, hoping to protect his family. Each family member keeps up appearances of being a Mao supporter while quietly helping others maintain a reasonable quality of life. Ling matures far beyond her 13 years as she copes with her fathera€™s eventual imprisonment and the constant torment by classmates who have joined the Red Guard. Narrator Jodi Long skillfully moves from naïve Ling who never quite accepts the hardships in her life to belligerent and officious Comrade Li who seems to find pleasure in hurting others. Long easily conveys Linga€™s confusion and bewilderment through her tone and pacing, and powerfully communicates Linga€™s inner strength and determination that life will improve some day. This semi-autobiographical novel comes alive with the authora€™s rich descriptions of the sights and smells of China at the beginning of the Cultural Revolution.-Wendy Woodfill, Hennepin County Library, Minnetonka, MN

Kirkus Reviews
It's 1972 China, and nine-year-old Ling is the child of two doctors. Life isn't perfect, but, Ling is happy, excels at school and loves studying English with her father. Everything changes with the advent of Chairman Mao's regime. Luxurious items like flowered fabrics and pastries disappear. Anything associated with the West becomes suspect. Then a political watchdog moves into the family's apartment. Their upstairs neighbors, the Wongs, are denounced and arrested; Ling's parents are demoted; and the family lives in fear about the future. School is horrible; Ling becomes the target of the son of a government official and is mocked and beaten because she's seen as bourgeois. When Ling's father saves a political poet, he too is taken into custody, and Ling and her mother must survive alone as further horrors unfold. This child's-eye view of the Chinese Cultural Revolution is ultimately a tale of survival; lyrical yet gripping, accessible and memorable, it's based on the author's experiences. Certain to inspire discussion about freedom and justice. (author's note, historical background) (Fiction. 10-14)
From the Publisher
*  “Readers should remain rapt by Compestine’s storytelling throughout this gripping account of life during China’s Cultural Revolution.”—Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

“Laced in all the right places with humor, fury, fear, resolve and eventual relief, her childlike voice is carefully maintained over the sweep of four years—candid and credible, naive and nuanced.”—San Francisco Chronicle

 “This child’s-eye view of the Chinese Cultural Revolution is ultimately a tale of survival; lyrical yet gripping, accessible and memorable, it’s based on the author’s experiences. Certain to inspire discussion about freedom and justice.”—Kirkus Reviews

 

“Authentic. . . . This semi-autobiographical novel comes alive with the author’s rich descriptions of the sights and smells of China at the beginning of the Cultural Revolution.”—School Library Journal

“In clipped lyrical sentences, Compestine’s first-person narrative sets a naïve child’s struggle to survive against betrayal and courage in one neighborhood and also the political panorama of spies and slogans.”—Booklist

“Compestine does a good job giving young YA readers a realistic picture of what that period of history meant to individuals caught in the political nightmare. Certainly those with a Chinese heritage will find the story important to understand their own family history.”—KLIATT

“Beautifully descriptive phrases allow this autobiographical fiction to come alive with the colors of the clothing that are lovingly sewn for Ling, the aromatic preparations of the food that is cooked, and the genuine appreciation of school, work, and valued neighbors. . . . The simple narrative is [refreshing] . . . in its youthful disbelief of the hardships that have befallen them in a changing political situation.”—Voice of Youth Advocates

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429924559
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
  • Publication date: 9/29/2009
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 138,097
  • Age range: 10 - 15 Years
  • File size: 454 KB

Meet the Author



Ying Chang Compestine grew up in China and now lives in California with her husband and son. She is the author of the young adult story collection A Banquet for Hungry Ghosts, as well as several picture books for children and cookbooks for adults.

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Read an Excerpt


Mother picked up a stack of old newspapers from beside the stove. Carefully, she checked every page before laying it around a stool, setting two sheets with Chairman Mao’s pictures on the counter. Months earlier, a nurse had been sent to prison as an anti-Maoist just because she lit her stove with a newspaper page with Mao’s photo.
I noticed a cloth rice sack in the corner next to some herbal medicine bottles and folded clothes. “Why are you packing, Mom?”
Without answering me, she led me to the stool and raked her hard-toothed comb through my hair.
As each stroke yanked at my scalp, pain shot through my mosquito-chewed body. I clenched my teeth, not wanting to cry out. Were we going to a labor camp?
Before knowing that they kept Father in the jail nearby, I had wished they would send us to his camp, wherever it was. Now I didn’t want to leave. I wanted to be here in case they ever brought him back to the hospital.
Something cold drizzled through my hair. Within a second, my scalp burned. “I hope this will kill the lice,” Mother whispered. Her ox-bone comb scraped against my raw scalp.
I couldn’t bear any more of the pain and the itching.
“You are hurting me!” I shouted.
Mother stopped.
Stiffening my back, I waited for her to scold me for raising my voice and showing disrespect.
A moment later, she whispered, “Ling, your hair is too thick. The coal oil can’t kill all the lice.” She put down her comb and left the room.
Didn’t she hear me shouting? What was she planning to do now?
Mother returned with a pair of scissors and Father’s razor. “We have to shave your head.”
I jumped off the chair. “No! There must be another way!”
She took a step back. “I don’t know what else to do, Ling. I used up this month’s ration. I even emptied the lamp. If I don’t cut your hair, the lice will spread throughout the apartment.” She tilted the blue oil cup, showing me it was empty. We received two cups of coal oil each month. Without the oil, we’d have to live in the dark for the rest of the month. Now I hated myself for being caught and for falling asleep on the dirty mattress.
Seeing sadness in her eyes, I knew she wouldn’t cut my hair if she could find another way. As far back as I could remember, she had told me that ladies should let their hair grow.
“Do what you must!” I was shaking, trying to hold my despair inside, as I threw myself back into the chair. I didn’t care about being a lady. I wanted to be a mean dragon. More than anything, I wanted to stop the pain and itching. I thought of Chairman Mao’s wife Jiang Qing’s ugly short hair.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 18 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 6, 2012

    "Certain to inspire discussion about freedom and justice.&q

    "Certain to inspire discussion about freedom and justice." Yes, as for those beautiful pastries and flower stitched clothes: Which peasant under feudal china could afford anything else except mudpies and the little rice that the land owning lords left for them? The Chinese revolution and subsequent cultural revolution is one of the most amazing developments in human history. The first time that the majority of working people rose up and attacked all things contrary to their class interest, symbolic of their thousands of years of silent indignation and subordination to kings, royals, monarchs, masters and capitalists. It is too bad that human society developed into classes as a result of undereducation and animal instincts, but at the rare revolutionary moments of history when the systemically suppressed masses rise up and demanding before their bourgeois rights of freedom of criticism and freedom to exploit, the right to self-determination of labor, production of all working people and the freedom to partake in society and its riches, created by themselves.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 22, 2011

    Great insight into the Chinese cultural revolution.

    This was interesting, very easy to follow, and has some emotional events that take place. It is interesting to see how strong Ling is in the situations that she encounters. A quick read and well worth it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2009

    Great Connection to the Chinese People who experienced the Cultural Revolution

    After studying China's modern history in political terms, this story was captivating as it brought me more understanding of the people's livelihood at the time and how it was affected. The novel was written in a way that the emotions of the characters could be felt. Stories like this help me learn more about the time period in a compelling way, especially when they are written as good as this.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 19, 2009

    Very Good and Short

    This was a very gripping read from a time period which I was just learning about, the Cultural Revolution. This book was definatly an eye opener! I was caught up in everything and I loved it. What she had to go though is unimaginable to a girl today. A definate read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2013

    Addicting

    I first read it in real life and finished it and i have to have it here to read it over and over again because its my fav book of all time and i just love it so much

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2013

    K

    I'll try

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2013

    Idiott

    I brought my friends! *Walks in with Barack Obama, Macklemore, Ceelo Greene, Adam Sandler, Blake Shelton, Usher, Shakira, Will.i.am, Jimmie Johnson, Pit Bull, Charlie Sheen, Chevy Chase, Bruno Mars, Geddy Lee, and the ghosts of Elvis, Jimi Hendrix, Johnny Cash, Michael Jackson, George Washington, Abe Lincoln and J. Edgar Hoover. Along with my rot weiler, Sanchez. We all set down and set down talking. Ozzy and Cheron Osborne walk in and set down with us.* OZZY: Sorry we're late, I couldn't find my wallet. CHERON: I told you to Check in the car! And where was it? OZZY: ...In the car. Cheron just shut up! We came to the dinner request of Jordan and we're gonna have dinner! ME: *Fist bumps Ozzy.* It's cool, bro!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 7, 2011

    Absolutely Phenomenal!!!

    I absolutely love this book!!! It is descriptive and fun to read for everyone- even for those who hate reading! I could not put this book down and forgot that I had to read it for an AP History class! The voice the main character has is aw-striking and amazing. This story will touch the hearts of all those who read it!!!

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  • Posted January 7, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Loved This Book!

    I thought this novel, despite its size, was a fabulous read. It shows the view of a young girl(Ling) in the time of the Chinese Revolution. Ling is the daughter of two doctors. When Mao Tse Tung enters Ling's life everything she loves begins to go away. When they take away her father Ling is brave and starts standing up for what she believes is right. Although I recommend this book to anyone who wants to read it, i especially recommend it to 11-13 year olds or people who are interested in the Chinese Revolution.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2008

    A Child's View of Communist China

    This is a gripping tale of an 8-year-old girl¿s experience during China¿s Cultural Revolution. With this book set in the 1970¿s, both of Ling¿s parents are doctors and she has a wonderful life style. When Comrade Li moves into the building and occupies part of Ling¿s apartment, her world is turned upside down. The Red Guard invades her life and the lives of innocent people around her, taking away all types of personal and intellectual freedoms. Ling also has a very frustrating experience in her school life because of the Mao regime. Students who read this story will develop a better understanding of communist China and a person¿s will to survive.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2011

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    Posted June 3, 2011

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    Posted July 17, 2011

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    Posted August 24, 2009

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    Posted May 29, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2009

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